Annual Report
Privacy 2011-2012

Introduction

The Privacy Act protects the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by a government institution and provides individuals with a right of access to that information.

As required under section 72, Statistics Canada has prepared an annual report on its administration of the Act during 2011-2012 and is tabling this report in each House of Parliament.

Administration of the Privacy Act

The Privacy Act, which concerns itself with personal information, stipulates that government institutions can collect personal information only if it relates to operating programs or activities of these institutions. In the case of Statistics Canada, the Statistics Act provides the authority to collect personal information for statistical purposes. The privacy legislation further demands that individuals from whom information is collected be informed of the purpose served by the collection and also protects collected information from disclosure.

The administration of the privacy legislation within Statistics Canada is the responsibility of the Information Management Division. The Director of this division is the Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator for the department.

There are three full-time officers in the Access to Information and Privacy Office whose duties involve processing of requests under the Privacy Act as well as under the Access to Information Act.

Mandate of Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada's mandate derives primarily from the Statistics Act. The Act requires that the Agency collects, compiles, analyses and publishes statistical information on the economic, social and general conditions of the country and its citizens. The Act also requires that Statistics Canada co-ordinate the national statistical system, specifically to avoid duplication in the information collected by government. To this end, the Chief Statistician may enter into joint data-collection or -sharing agreements with provincial and territorial statistical agencies, as well as with federal, provincial and territorial government departments pursuant to provisions of the Act.

The Statistics Act specifically requires Statistics Canada to conduct a Census of Population and a Census of Agriculture every five years. The Act also gives the Agency substantial powers to request information for statistical purposes through surveys of Canadian businesses and households. By default, response to Statistics Canada's surveys is mandatory under the Act; refusal to participate is subject to legal penalties. The Act includes provisions to make participation in data collection voluntary: Statistics Canada has done so generally with household data collection other than the Census of Population and the Labour Force Survey – the latter produces key economic data. The Census of Agriculture and all key surveys of businesses are mandatory.

Statistics Canada can also, by law, access all administrative records, including personal and business tax data, customs declarations, and birth and death records. Such records are criticalsources of statistical information, which enable the Agency to reduce reporting burden on business and individual respondents. Statistics Canada is considered a leader among the world's statistical agencies in reducing reporting burden by using administrative data.

These mechanisms help Statistics Canada achieve its long-standing strategic outcome, which is to ensure Canadians have access to objective, high-quality, non-partisan statistics, statistical products, services and analyses on Canada's economy and society that fulfill legal requirements, are relevant to policy formulation and decision makers, and are responsive to emerging issues.

Delegation instrument

A detailed list of authorities under the Privacy Act has been formally delegated by the Minister Responsible for Statistics Canada (Appendix A).

Statistical report

The statistical report provides aggregate data on the application of the Privacy Act. This information is made public annually in an Info Source Bulletin, which is included with the annual report. The following includes the statistical report on privacy for the current reporting period (Appendix B).

Implementation: Privacy

Privacy requests

In the current reporting period, the Agency received 65 requests; there were four requests outstanding from the previous reporting period for a total of 69 requests. Of this total, 62 requests were completed, leaving seven which are being carried forward to the next reporting period.

Privacy requests
Disposition of requests completed Total
All disclosed 26
Disclosed in part 15
Nothing disclosed (exempt) 1
Does not exist 17
Abandoned 3
Total 62

There were 15 requests for which information was disclosed in part. Of these, the application of section 26 was invoked in 12 cases in order to protect personal information about individuals other than the person making the request.

There were three requests abandoned by the requestors and 17 requests that could not be processed because the requested records did not exist.

Formal/informal interface

Statistics Canada responds to a large number of requests for personal information through its pension searches program without invoking the formal processes of the Privacy Act. This program was set up to provide members of the public with information from their own census records and the 1940 National Registration records to support applications for pensions, citizenship, passports and similar situations where other administrative records such as birth certificates are required, but no longer exist, or were never issued. During 2011-2012, the pension searches program received 1,840 such cases.

Statistics Canada also responded to a number of requests from trustees or estate administrators seeking personal information from census and/or 1940 National Registration records of deceased individuals, minors or dependent adults. Regulations with respect to privacy allow for the same rights or actions as are given to an individual to be exercised or performed on behalf of a minor or an incompetent person by someone duly authorized to administer the affairs or estate of that person. In the case of deceased persons, the administrator of the estate may exercise these rights but only for the purposes of estate administration. Statistics Canada processed 157 such requests during the current reporting period.

Complaints and investigations

There were four complaints lodged with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner during the current reporting period and three complaints from the previous reporting period. Of these complaints, five were from persons who said that Statistics Canada did not provide all requested records; the other two complaints were made due to the delay in providing records.

For one complaint in the former group, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner ruled that it was not well-founded. The remaining four complaints remain under investigation.

For the latter group, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner ruled that both complaints were not well-founded.

Types of disclosure under subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act

The Privacy Act, in subsection 8(2), describes the circumstances under which personal information may be disclosed without the consent of the individual to whom the information pertains. Although this disclosure of personal information is discretionary, it is subject to any other Act of Parliament. In the case of Statistics Canada, the Statistics Act provides a statutory prohibition against disclosure of identifiable information, without the knowledge and consent of the individual concerned. Therefore, personal information collected under the Statistics Act cannot be disclosed pursuant to subsection 8(2).

In the case of personal information in records held by Statistics Canada and subject only to the Privacy Act (i.e., those of employees and contractors), disclosures under subsection 8(2) can occur in certain circumstances: for the purpose for which information is obtained or compiled by the institution, for a use consistent with the purpose described in personal information banks registered to Statistics Canada, or for the purpose of complying with subpoenas, warrants, court orders and rules of court.

During the current reporting period, Statistics Canada did not disclose any personal information under subsections 8(2)(e) and (m) of the Privacy Act.

Privacy impact assessments

The Treasury Board Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Directive requires all federal government departments undertaking new or substantially redesigned programs that involve the collection, use or disclosure of personal information to do a privacy impact assessment of the activity. With regards to the collection, use and dissemination of statistical data, Statistics Canada has its own PIA directive that specifies the roles and responsibilities of its statistical program areas and privacy specialists in the Information Management Division.

In 2006, Statistics Canada conducted a generic assessment of privacy risks associated with the collection, use and disclosure of personal information for statistical purposes. The Generic Privacy Impact Assessment for Statistics Canada Surveys (updated in 2009) covers the majority of the Agency's household and business surveys and describes in detail the manner in which the Agency meets each of the ten privacy principles. As well, this document includes a threat and risk assessment that focuses on the Agency's major data collection methodologies such as computer-assisted interviewing, self-enumeration and electronic data reporting. This document is posted on the Statistics Canada web site.

In cases where the generic PIA is deemed not applicable to a survey due to special or enhanced privacy risks, a specific privacy impact assessment is produced. In the current reporting period, a PIA for the 2012-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey, Cycle 3 was completed and copies were sent to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and Treasury Board Secretariat. The following is a brief description:

2012-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey, Cycle 3

The Canadian Health Measures Survey collects direct physical measures of Canadians' health including blood and urine samples for laboratory testing. For each two-year collection period, about 5,500 participants between the ages of 3 to 79 complete the physical measures testing in the CHMS mobile examination centre that travels to sites across the country. Participation in all components of the survey is voluntary for the selected participants. Its PIA was reviewed and updated at the beginning of this new cycle in order to identify any new privacy, confidentiality and security risks to participants' personal information and to make recommendations to resolve or mitigate these risks; the PIA also provided an update on ongoing or previously identified privacy concerns.

According to the Treasury Board Directive, the collection, use and disclosure of personal information in the context of new or redesigned administrative programs and services for example, human resources and marketing may require that a privacy impact assessment be conducted. In the current reporting period, Statistics Canada did not complete any such PIAs.

Summaries of completed privacy impact assessments.

Data matching (Record linkage)

As outlined in Statistics Canada's Directive on Record Linkage, linkages of different records pertaining to the same individual are carried out only for statistical purposes and only when the results of the linkage will yield a potential public benefit which clearly outweighs the invasion of the privacy of individuals. One of the primary objectives of these linkages, therefore, is to provide statistical information to support various research studies.

All record linkage proposals must satisfy a prescribed review process as outlined in the directive. It should be noted as well that, in many cases, files produced from the linkages are stored in a way that does not allow the retrieval of an individual record by name or other personal identifier. The public dissemination of any information resulting from record linkages, like all other statistical information, is only at an aggregate level which protects the confidentiality of the information of individuals.

During the current reporting period, there were 16 approved record linkages that involved personal information. A summary of these record linkages is found in Appendix C.

Institution-specific policies, guidelines and procedures

During the reporting period, Statistics Canada developed and implemented a new policy on privacy and confidentiality as well as two new directives (Directive on Access to Information and Privacy and Directive on Conducting Privacy Impact Assessments). As well, the Agency has posted to its web site information on the duty to assist for requestors under the Privacy Act.

Training initiatives for privacy

Information Management Division provides formal instruction to Agency staff on the Privacy Act. In 2011-2012, four sessions were presented as part of the Agency's Middle Managers training program and the Business and Economic Statistics training program. An estimated 80 persons attended these sessions.

Appendix A

Access to Information and Privacy Acts Delegation Order

The Minister Responsible for Statistics Canada, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers and functions of the Minister as the head of a government institution, under the section of the Acts set out in the schedule opposite each position. This Designation Order supersedes all previous Designation Orders.

Schedule

Schedule
Position Access to Information Act and Regulations Privacy Act and Regulations
Chief Statistician of Canada Full authority Full authority
Assistant Chief Statistician, Corporate Services Full authority Full authority
Chief of Staff, Office of the Chief Statistician Full authority Full authority
Director General, Communications and Information Services Full authority Full authority
Director, Information Management Division Full authority Full authority
Chief, Access to Information and Privacy Sections: 7(a), 7(b), 8(1), 9, 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6), 12(2)(b), 12(3)(b), 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 22.1, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27(1), 27(4), 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4), 33, 35(2)(b), 71(1)
Regulations:
Sections: 6(1), 7(2), 7(3), 8, 8.1
Sections: 8(2)(j), 8(2)(m), 8(4), 8(5), 9(1), 9(4), 10, 14, 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b),18(2), 19(1), 19(2), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24,25, 26, 27, 28
Regulations:
Sections: 9, 11(2), 11(4), 13(1), 14
Senior Access to Information and Privacy Project Manager Sections: 7(a), 8(1), 9, 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6), 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27(1), 27(4), 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4), 71(1)
Regulations:
Sections: 6(1), 7(2), 7(3), 8, 8.1
Sections: 8(2)(j), 8(2)(m), 10, 14, 15, 18(2), 19(1), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
Regulations:
Sections: 9, 11(2)
Access to Information and Privacy Project Officer Sections 8(1) and 9 for all records Section 15 for all records

Dated, at the City of Ottawa
this 11 day of 10, 2011
The Honourable Christian Paradis
Minister responsible for Statistics Canada

Appendix B

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Statistics Canada

Reporting period: 01/04/2012 to 31/03/2013

Part 1 - Requests under the Privacy Act

Requests under the Privacy Act
Requests under the Privacy Act
Requests Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 65
Outstanding from previous reporting period 4
Total 69
Closed during reporting period 62
Carried over to next reporting period 7

Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Table summary
This table displays the Disposition and completion time of requests. The information is grouped by Disposition of requests (appearing as row headers) and Completion Time (appearing as column headers).
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
All disclosed 19 7 0 0 0 0 0 26
Disclosed in part 5 6 4 0 0 0 0 15
All exempted 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 13 2 2 0 0 0 0 17
Request abandoned 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3
Total 38 16 7 0 1 0 0 62
2.2 Exemptions
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 3
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 12
27 0
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 26 0 0
Disclosed in part 14 1 0
Total 40 1 0
2.5 Complexity
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 80 80 26
Disclosed in part 1520 750 15
All exempted 0 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 3
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Table summary
This table displays the results of 2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests. The information is grouped by Disposition (appearing as row headers), Less than 100 pages processed, 101-500 pages processed, 501-1000 pages processed, 1001-5000 pages processed and More than 5000 pages processed (appearing as column headers).
Disposition Less than 100
pages processed
101-500
pages processed
501-1000
pages processed
1001-5000
pages processed
More than 5000
pages processed
Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 26 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 13 62 1 251 0 0 1 437 0 0
All exempted 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 43 142 1 251 0 0 1 437 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0
2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Table summary
This table displays the Reasons for not meeting statutory deadlines. The information is grouped by Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline (appearing as row headers) and Principal Reason (appearing as column headers).
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
0 0 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
2.7 Requests for translation
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 - Disclosures under subsection 8(2)

Disclosures under subsection 8(2)
Disclosures under subsection 8(2)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
0 0 0

Part 4 - Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Requests Number of Requests
Requests for correction received 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Requests for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0

Part 5 - Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Table summary
This table displays the results of Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests. The information is grouped by Disposition of requests where an extension was taken (appearing as row headers), 15(a)(i) Interference with operations, 15(a)(ii) Consultation and 15(b) Translation or conversion (appearing as column headers).
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i)
Interference with
operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 3 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1 0 0 0
Total 4 0 0 0
5.2 Length of extensions
5.2 Length of extensions
Table summary
This table displays the Length of extensions. The information is grouped by Length of extensions (appearing as row headers), 15(a)(i) Interference with operations, 15(a)(ii) Consultation and 15(b) Translation or conversion (appearing as column headers).
Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with
operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 3 0 0 0
Total 3 0 0 0

Part 6 - Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 0 0 1 27
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 1 27
Closed during the reporting period 0 0 1 27
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Table summary
This table displays the Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions. The information is grouped by Recommendation (appearing as row headers) and Number of days required to complete consultation requests (appearing as column headers).
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Table summary
This table displays the Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations. The information is grouped by Recommendation (appearing as row headers) and Number of days required to complete consultation requests (appearing as column headers).
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
Disclose entirely 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 days 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0
Total 0 0

Part 8 – Resources related to the Privacy Act

8.1 Costs
8.1 Costs
Table summary
This table displays the Resources related to the Privacy Act. The information is grouped by Expenditures (appearing as row headers) and dollar amount (appearing as column headers).
Expenditures Amount ($)
Salaries 67,543
Overtime 0
Goods and Services Contracts for privacy impact assessments 0
Professional services contracts 0
Other 11,853
Total 79,396
8.2 Human Resources
8.2 Human Resources
Table summary
This table displays the Human Resources used. The information is grouped by Full-time employees, Part-time and casual employees, Regional staff, Consultants and agency personnel, and Students (appearing as row headers), Dedicated full-time, Dedicated part-time, and Total (appearing as column headers).
Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 0.70 0.10 0.80
Part-time and casual employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 0.70 0.10 0.80

Appendix C

Record Linkages

Approved record linkages containing personal information

The following is a summary of the record linkages containing personal information that were approved during the reporting period of 2011-2012.

Census of Population and National Household Survey Linkage

Purpose: The Census of Population is designed to provide basic information about the demographic and social characteristics of all people living in Canada. The National Household Survey (NHS) complements the data collected on the Census by providing greatly detailed information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of people in Canada, as well as providing information about the housing units in which they live.

By linking the Census and the NHS, starting with the 2011 Census year, it will be possible to use available information from one survey to compensate for non-response to the other, as well as to maximize consistency of common Census and NHS demographic and language variables and, as a result, produce data of the highest possible quality.

Description: The responses to the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 NHS will be matched for each household, using a geographical identifier which consists of province, census division, collection unit and visitation record line number. The responses to the 2011 Census from each person in a household will be matched to the NHS responses for the same household, using variables such as name, sex, date of birth, age and marital status to match the individual records. The only exception to this pertains to any cases in which Census respondents explicitly refused to complete a questionnaire; these cases will be excluded from the linkage process.

Demographic and language information from the 2011 NHS will be added to the 2011 Census database, and vice versa, to replace missing information.

Output: Only aggregate statistical estimates that conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. The linked information from the 2011 Census of Population and 2011 NHS will be used to produce estimates for dissemination as part of the product line from each survey. Outputs for the Census and the NHS will include a wide range of analysis and standard data tables as well as custom tabulations.

The linked Census and NHS analysis databases for each census cycle will be retained indefinitely. For the 2011 Census cycle, the linking key file, containing unique frame identifiers, personal identifiers and a quality measure of the person-level linkage, will be kept until March 31, 2013, or until no longer required, at which time it will be destroyed. All files will be password-protected and kept on a server in a secure area. Access to the linking keys and linked analysis databases is restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose assigned work activities require such access.

2011 National Household Survey Linkage to T1 Personal Income Tax and Canada Child Tax Benefit Files for the Income Question

Purpose: To obtain information on the income of respondents to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The NHS requires detailed information on twelve different sources of income, total income, as well as income taxes paid; accurate reporting requires that respondents consult their own tax returns. Linking the NHS records to the T1 personal tax and Canada Child Tax Benefit files for those respondents who agreed to linkage reduces their response burden and improves the data quality. The NHS income data are used, among other data sources, to measure total income, after-tax income, disposable income and the Market-Basket Measure of low-income.

Description: For respondents who gave permission, information on income sources, total income and taxes paid is linked from their 2010 T1 personal income tax records and 2010 Canada Child Tax Benefit records to their responses to the NHS. No linkage occurs for NHS respondents who did not consent; those respondents were requested to complete the income question on the 2011 NHS questionnaire.

Output: Only aggregate statistical estimates and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act are released outside of Statistics Canada. The linked NHS, tax and CCTB information are used to produce income estimates for dissemination as part of the NHS product line. Outputs for the NHS include a wide range of analysis and standard data tables, as well as custom tabulations.

The linked NHS edit and imputation file will be retained indefinitely. The linking key file, containing personal identifiers, will be kept until June 2015, or until no longer required, at which time it will be destroyed. All files are password-protected and kept on a server in a secure area. Access to the linking keys and linked NHS edit and imputation file is restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose assigned work activities require such access.

Longitudinal Immigration Database Re-design and Updates, and Creation of a Linkage Control File

Purpose: The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) enables the federal and provincial governments involved in immigration issues and programs, as well as the research community and immigrant settlement agencies in Canada, to conduct research regarding the selection of immigrants, their settlement patterns and their economic integration into Canadian society.

The IMDB is the only source of data that can support research on the impact of immigration policy levers such as the category of admission, selection criteria and special admissions program, on economic outcomes. Furthermore, the IMDB is the only source of longitudinal data with a sufficient sample of immigrants to examine settlement trajectories and integration patterns over time and by characteristics at arrival and selection criteria.

To reduce linkage processing time and improve quality, a Linkage Control File containing over 35 million individuals' names, Social Insurance Numbers (SINs), dates of birth and other personal information will be constructed from linked personal tax information.

Description: An Immigrant File is constructed from Citizenship and Immigration Canada's (CIC) immigration and immigrant landing administrative files, as well as information from the Government of Quebec on selection of immigrants to that province. These files will cover the period 1980 to 2014. The Linkage Control File is constructed by linking the annual T1 Family Files (from individuals' tax returns and Canada Child Tax Benefit records) from 1982 onward until the 2014 processing year.

The Immigrant File is linked to the Linkage Control File to obtain SINs, then to the T1 Family File (T1FF) to obtain family, employer and income information. Once an individual immigrant's data have been successfully matched for the first time, the record will be retained in the IMDB and will be matched annually to the T1FF.

The following information on non-immigrants will also be added to the IMDB: the number of non-immigrants in each immigrant's family, and the number of non-immigrants employed in the industry of each immigrant's employer.

Once these files have been linked, all names and SINs are removed from the IMDB analysis file and stored in a separate linking key file. The Linkage Control File is also stored separately from the IMDB analysis file. An immigration indicator and landing information are added annually to the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) analysis file maintained by Statistics Canada.

Output: Only aggregate statistics and analysis conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. These will be in the form of tables on income distribution, interprovincial mobility, industry of employment, and provincial indicators produced for CIC, as well as other federal and provincial organizations. On request, multivariate analyses and statistical tables will be produced from the IMDB analysis file for researchers. All access to the analysis file will be on Statistics Canada premises and will be restricted to only those employees and deemed employees of Statistics Canada whose assigned work duties require such access.

The IMDB analysis file, containing immigration data for 1980 to 2014 and T1FF information for 1982 to 2014, will be retained until at least July 2016. At that time, Policy Committee will be requested to review the IMDB linkage program, to assess its continued relevancy to immigration policy development. The IMDB linkage key file will also be retained until at least July 2016, to facilitate future updates to the IMDB analysis file, subject to Policy Committee approval. The immigration indicator and landing information are retained indefinitely on the LAD.

The Linkage Control File will be retained indefinitely and will be registered as a Personal Information Bank (PIB); the IMDB and the LAD are registered as PIBs.

Perinatal Outcomes Study: Live Birth, Infant Death and Stillbirth Records Linked to 20% Sample Data from the 1996 and 2006 Censuses of Population

Purpose: To assess perinatal outcomes in Canada according to risk factors related to socio-economic position, ethnocultural background and environmental exposures. Perinatal outcomes to be examined include preterm and small- and large-for-gestationalage birth, plus birth weight-specific and gestational age-specific fetal and infant mortality.

More specifically, the objectives of this study are: to estimate differences in major perinatal outcomes in Canada by multiple measures of socio-economic position and ethnocultural background, including maternal and paternal education and occupation, income and housing characteristics of the family, and the ethnicity and nativity of each parent; to understand the role of contextual (neighbourhood) effects on perinatal outcomes after controlling for individual characteristics; to examine the effects of mothers' birth histories on perinatal outcomes; to estimate the effects of exposure to ambient air pollution on perinatal outcomes; and to estimate the extent to which all of the above have changed over the time periods covered by the study.

Description: The previously-linked Canadian Live Birth, Infant Death and Stillbirth Database combines information from the Canadian Live Birth Database, the Canadian Mortality Database, and the Canadian Stillbirth Database, beginning in 1985. However, it fails to account for the interrelationship of successive births to the same mother, and it contains minimal if any information on parental socio-economic, ethnocultural and environmental health risks and protective factors which are known to affect perinatal health outcomes. Creation of an internally-linked, longitudinally-oriented file linking successive births to the same mother will identify sets of multiple births, permit the systematic examination of the extent to which a woman's successive pregnancy outcomes tend to repeat, and permit the assessment of the risk of adverse birth outcomes conditioned on her previous birth outcomes. Linkage of a sample of births to census data will provide much of the missing information, for a reasonably large sample of births in two recent periods, while avoiding the need for additional data collection. This study will also make use of the air pollution exposure data assembled for the previously approved Air Pollution, Mortality and Cancer Study.

The census-linked birth records for this study will consist of a 20% sample of births in the two years previous to the 1996 census and in the two years previous to the 2006 census, plus records for subsequent sibling births up to two years after each census, and records for previous sibling births to the same mothers (a total of approximately 430,000 births). The birth records have previously been linked to corresponding infant deaths up to 12 months following each birth. The birth outcome information to be included in the linked files originate from data collected by Canadian provincial and territorial registries of vital statistics, which have been extensively processed, validated, and linked by Statistics Canada. The census data to be included in the linked files were collected, processed, and validated by Statistics Canada.

The linked files will contain only those data items required to conduct the study. Names will be used only for linkage purposes, then removed from the linked microdata analysis files. Only a sample of births–about 4.5% of the longitudinally-oriented birth file– will be linked to census data.

Output: The linked files will, at all times, remain on Statistics Canada premises. Access to the linked microdata will be restricted to Statistics Canada staff and deemed employees whose work activities require access. Only aggregate data that conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Major findings will be used to prepare research papers for publication in peerreviewed journals (including Statistics Canada's Health Reports) and presentations at
workshops and conferences.

The linked analysis files, stripped of direct personal identifiers, will be retained until December 31, 2024, at which time their continued retention will be reviewed. The corresponding linkage key files housed in the Statistics Canada Privacy Office will also be retained until December 31, 2024, at which time their continued retention will be reviewed.

Maternal Mortality and Infant Outcomes in Canada, 2001 to 2008

Purpose: To ascertain all women in Canada who died while pregnant or within a year following a live birth or fetal death in order to assess the magnitude of and to better understand the epidemiology, causes, and trends of pregnancy-associated deaths and pregnancy-related deaths in Canada; and to study the outcomes of infants whose mother has died.

Description: Records from the Canadian Mortality Database (CMDB) of women, aged 10 to 55, who died between 2001 and 2008 were linked to records of births (Canadian Birth Database) and stillbirths (Canadian Stillbirth Database) that occurred between 2000 and 2008 and to infant deaths (CMDB) that occurred between 2000 and 2009.

The final Maternal Mortality - Birth/Stillbirth/Infant Death Analysis File contains linked women mortality records as well as birth/infant mortality records and stillbirth records. All direct personal identifiers and addresses were removed from the analysis file and stored in a separate linkage key file following completion of the linkage. Coded Census Dissemination Area/Enumeration Area is the lowest level of geography on the linked analysis file. Each record includes a random Statistics Canada identification number.

Output: Only aggregate statistics and analytical output conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Results of this study will be communicated through publication in peer-reviewed journals. In 2013, the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System plans to publish a report Maternal Mortality and Severe Morbidity in Canada. Also, the study findings will be disseminated through publications on the Internet and through presentations to associations.

The linked analysis file and linkage key file will be retained for at least 10 years, that is, until December 2023, or until they are no longer required, at which time they will be destroyed.

Unmet Health Care Needs and Adverse Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Disease

Purpose: The specific objectives of this project are to determine if unmet health care needs amongst patients with chronic disease are associated with increased health resource use (number of all-cause and cause-specific hospitalizations, length of stay and hospital readmission rates) and to determine the association between unmet health care needs and adverse health outcomes (all-cause and cause-specific hospitalizations, readmission, in-hospital mortality) among patients with chronic disease.

Description: A major objective of a public health care system is to identify more efficient and equitable methods to deliver treatment/care to those with chronic conditions. Despite the availability of effective treatments, many Canadians still do not receive optimal care for these conditions. This may be a result of a number of factors including reduced access to health services or barriers to care. The identification of potential barriers to care and determining if these barriers result in poor health outcomes have important implications when discussing strategies to optimize care and ultimately reduce health care costs amongst chronic disease populations.

The study requires that records of respondents to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) be linked to hospitalization records. The files from cycle 1.1 (2000-2001), cycle 1.2 (2002), and cycle 2.1 (2003) of the CCHS have been linked to hospitalization records for the years 1994-1995 to 2002-2003. Only those records of survey respondents who granted consent to link their data were used in the linkage.

Individuals with chronic disease (including number and type) will be identified using CCHS data based on responses in the "Chronic Condition" module. Responses to questions related to unmet health care needs will identify those who have experienced barriers to care and those who have not. To assess the potential impact and outcomes of unmet needs, individuals will be "followed" over time using hospitalization records to assess hospital-related outcomes including all-cause hospitalization, disease-specific hospitalization and length of stay.

Output: The analysis is being conducted as part of research related to doctoral studies. The results will also be published in peer-reviewed journal articles.

2011 Farm Environmental Management Survey: Linkage to the 2011 Census of Agriculture

Purpose: To provide current information on national agri-environmental conditions and risks, as well as on-farm beneficial management practices (BMPs). BMPs are farming practices which have been scientifically proven to reduce the impact of agricultural activities on soil and water resources while maintaining the economic viability of the industry. Linkage of the 2011 Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) to the 2011 Census of Agriculture will enable analysis of the steps farms are taking to minimize the impact of farming on the environment.

The linkage will provide critical information for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)'s agri-environmental targets established under the Growing Forward Policy Framework. The linked data will be key inputs to AAFC's National Agri-Environmental Health Analysis and Reporting Program which, through models, provides the agriculture industry, decision-makers and the Canadian public with information on the environmental performance of Canadian agriculture. In addition, the linkage reduces the response burden on farmers, as information on farm operations and socio-economic variables collected on the Census of Agriculture will not be collected on the FEMS questionnaire.

Description: The 2011 FEMS will be linked to the 2011 Census of Agriculture, using the Farm Register number, to obtain information on farm operations, such as area farmed, number of livestock, expenditures for fertilizers, herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, and socio-economic factors. Once the linkage is complete, all direct identifiers, including name, address, telephone number and Farm Register number, will be removed from the linked analysis file.

Output: Only non-confidential aggregate statistical outputs and analyses that conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Aggregate statistics will be produced from the linked analysis file by Statistics Canada for AAFC and other clients. Findings will be published in Statistics Canada's research papers and survey reports and by AAFC. The linked analysis file, stripped of identifiers, will be retained indefinitely by Statistics Canada.

Birth Outcomes and Infant Mortality among Children Born to Immigrant Mothers inCanada: Analysis of Linked Birth, Stillbirth and Mortality Data, 2001 to 2005-2006

Purpose: To provide a profile of perinatal health, by analysis of birth weight, length of gestation and infant mortality, among children born to immigrant mothers in Canada, in comparison to the children of Canadian-born mothers. The individual and neighborhood characteristics associated with various birth outcomes and infant mortality will be assessed in order to identify risk factors for adverse outcomes.

Description: The analysis file contains the results of five annual linkages, commencing with linkage of the 2001 Canadian Birth Database (CBDB) to the records of infant deaths (that is, deaths of children under age 1 year) in the 2001-2002 Canadian Mortality Database (CMDB), and of each subsequent data year, finishing with linkage of the 2005 CBDB to the 2005-2006 CMDB. Data from the 2001 to 2005 Canadian Stillbirth Database have also been added to the linked birth/mortality file.

The final birth/mortality analysis file contains linked birth/infant mortality records and stillbirth records, as well as birth records which did not link to an infant death. All direct personal identifiers and addresses were removed from the analysis file and stored in a separate linkage key file following completion of the linkage. Coded Census Dissemination Area/Enumeration Area is the lowest level of geography on the linked analysis file. Each record includes a random Statistics Canada identification number.

Output: Only aggregate statistics and analytical output conforming to the confidentialityprovisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Access to the linkage key file is restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose work activities require such access. Results of this study will be communicated through publication in peer-reviewed journals, including Statistics Canada's Health Reports.

The results of this Canadian research will be compared with similar research on immigrant and non-immigrant groups in the United States and other OECD countries (for example, France, Germany, Netherlands, and Spain). The linked analysis file and linkage key file will be retained until December 2012, at which time they will be destroyed.

Group Crime and Networks of Co-offenders: Linkage of the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, 1995 to 2010

Purpose: To quantify the prevalence of group crime and networks of co-offenders involved in criminal activity in Canada. The research will provide information on the characteristics of group crime and networks of co-offenders, including the extent to which co-offending groups are organized entities or transient opportunistic phenomena, and the involvement of younger, less experienced offenders in co-offending with older, more experienced offenders. Escalation of the frequency and seriousness of criminal activity will also be examined. Research on patterns of group crime and criminal networks is a major interest of members of the National Justice Statistics Initiative, and the findings will enable them to better formulate crime prevention policies and programs.

Description: This will be the first large-scale study in Canada of group crime and the development of co-offending networks over time. For each individual who had at least one police-reported criminal offence, records in the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey · (UCR2) will be linked across reference years 1995 to 201 0. Upon completion of the linkage, the linking keys will be removed from the linked analysis file and replaced by randomly-generated study identifiers.

Output: Only aggregate statistics and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Access to the linking keys and linked analysis file will be restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose assigned work activities require such access.

The results of the linkage will be announced in The Daily in the form of a technical report or as part of the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' Juristat publication series. Findings may also be reported by the researchers in the form of conference presentations and scholarly publications. Statistics Canada will retain the linked analysis file until March 31, 2015, or until no longer required, at which time the linked analysis file will be destroyed.

Apprenticeship Training and Labour Market Outcomes

Purpose: To assess the economic returns to former apprentices of their training. Earnings outcomes and employment stability will be compared for those who completed an apprenticeship program, those who discontinued their participation in such training, and those who qualified for trade certification without enrolling in an apprenticeship training program.

Existing shortages in the skilled trades are expected to worsen as retirements of skilled tradespersons increase in Canada's aging population. The Training and Apprenticeship Division of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship will conduct research to fill the knowledge gap on the returns to apprenticeship training and how that training can be improved, as well as the impact of the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program for skilled trades. The research results may be used to strengthen the design of apprenticeship training programs, ensuring that they meet the labour market needs of apprentices, employers and industry.

Description: The study cohort will be constructed from information on apprentices who responded to the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey as well as from records in the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) for reporting years 2002 to 2004 and 2008. The RAIS will also provide information on trade qualifiers for the same reporting years. The records of apprenticeship completers, discontinuers and trade qualifiers in the cohort will be linked to the 2002 to 2009 T1 Family File (T1FF) and the 2002 to 2009 Longitudinal Immigration Database to create a longitudinal analysis database of former apprentices. Only data on apprentices and trade qualifiers that match to the T1FF will be retained on the linked analysis file; unmatched records will be discarded.

Output: The output will be a linked apprenticeship analysis file that contains apprenticeship training and demographic information, trade, immigration information, and earnings, employment, mobility, charitable donations and receipt of social assistance or workers compensation payments. Only aggregate statistics and analysis conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada.

All direct personal identifiers and linking keys will be removed from the linked analysis file once linkage has been completed by Statistics Canada employees. Access to the direct personal identifiers, linking keys, and the linked analysis file will be restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose assigned work activities require access. The linked analysis file will be retained by Statistics Canada until at least September 2016, or until no longer required, at which time it will be destroyed.

The Burden of Obesity, Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis in Ontario - Addition of Data Years and Extension of Retention Period

Purpose: To improve treatment strategies for people suffering from obesity, Osteoarthritis (OA) and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), and to reduce the costs of treating them. The study will remedy the fact that little is known about the socio-demographic characteristics of the Ontario population with such health condition/illnesses, their quality of life, satisfaction with health care, health care resource utilization, and ensuing medical costs. The study will establish a cost per patient; identify the determinants of health care utilization and medical costs and, for obesity, provide a breakdown of health care utilization/medical costs per body mass index (BMI) levels. In determining utilization and costs, the study will take into account differences in individuals' characteristics and lifestyle.

In many cases of illnesses, physicians and health care policy makers are unaware of the true burden on the health care system and on sufferers. Burden of illness studies, such as this one, can provide a method for demonstrating the importance of a specific disease to society; provide a baseline against which treatment interventions can be assessed; help determine priorities for future medical research, and; help identify the cost drivers of the condition/disease. Additionally, burden of illness studies can further our understanding of the impact the condition/disease has on patients' quality of life and productivity. Findings may assist in the development of obesity, OA and RA policy models to evaluate different treatment and management strategies in Ontario. As well, the evidence generated in the area of obesity may be used by the Canadian Obesity Network which brings together researchers, health professionals, industry, policy makers and others across Canada.

Description: The 2000-2001, 2003 and 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey will be linked to the Medical Services files and the Discharge Abstract Database In-Patient and Day Procedures for the years 1999-2000 to 2006-2007 and to the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System Day Procedures files for the years 2003-2004 to 2006-2007, using a deterministic match on an encrypted health number. A validation procedure, carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, will ensure that only valid health card numbers are found on the cohort file, and are encrypted. A probabilistic matching based on birth date, sex, and postal code will be used to resolve incomplete linkage results. Only cases where informed consent was received from the survey respondents will be linked.

Output: Only aggregate data and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada, in the form of a release in The Daily, articles in peer-reviewed journals, and through presentations at local, national and international conferences. The linked file will be retained until December 31, 2016, at which time it will be destroyed.

Socio-economic Influences on Use of Physicians in Ontario: Linkage of Canadian Community Health Survey and Ontario Medical Services Data - Addition of Data Years and Extension of Retention Period

Purpose: To examine whether the socio-economic status of patients influences their use of general practitioner (GP) services, their referral patterns to specialists, and their joint use of different physicians' services. Actual, rather than self-reported, measures of physician utilization will be employed. More specifically, the research will:

  1. assess whether use of GP services, measured by the number of visits, the type of services and the related expenditures, varies with a patient's socio-economic status (measured by income and education), after taking health care needs (measured by selfreported health status) into account;
  2. model the pathway between a patient's use of GP services and their use of specialist services, taking into account socio-economic status differences and health care needs; and,
  3. determine whether certain categories of survey respondents systematically over- or under-report the number of physician visits they made in the year prior to the survey.

These findings will provide valuable information to the medical community and to health policy makers. The results may indicate that certain population groups are disadvantaged by the current delivery of health care, in which case the study will indicate where changes should be made.

Description: Data from respondents to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), cycle 1.1 (2000-2001 ), cycle 2.1 (2003) and cycle 3.1 (2005) will be linked to administrative information on visits to physicians and health services received in Ontario. Only those cases where informed consent was received from survey respondents will be linked. The administrative databases used in this research project are the Medical Services files based on Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) claims for eight fiscal years: 1999-2000 to 2006-2007.

The data will be linked using deterministic matching on an encrypted health number. A validation procedure, carried out by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHL TC), has made sure only valid health card numbers for CCHS records are found on the cohort file, and are encrypted. Health card numbers have been similarly encrypted on the health administrative databases. Personal identifiers will be removed from the files and a number assigned by Statistics Canada will be appended to records in the administrative databases that link to CCHS records.

The study is part of a pilot project between Statistics Canada, the MOHL TC and McMaster University aimed at enhancing access to Ontario health information by the research community. The creation of an analytical file, as well as aggregation and analysis of the data, will be carried out in the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC) at McMaster University. The researcher accessing the data in the RDC will do so as a deemed employee of Statistics Canada.

Output: Only aggregate statistical outputs conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Research findings will be disseminated through a release in The Daily, research papers, peer-reviewed journal articles or through presentations at national or international conferences. Statistics Canada will retain the linked files for a period of five years, that is, until December 31, 2016, at which time they will be destroyed.

The Role of Technological Innovation in the Increased Concentration of Health Care Expenditure on the Elderly in Ontario- Addition of Data Years and Extension of Retention Period

Purpose: By examining the relationship between the patient's age and the medical treatment received for a given health condition, this study will provide a basis for more accurate predictions of future health care expenditures in Ontario, taking into account the rate at which new technologies are adopted. The effect of numerous patient characteristics on health care expenditures, such as health conditions, region of residence, income, and education, will be examined by using health survey data. Findings may help decision makers to assess the benefits of increased health care expenditures. More specifically, the study will answer the following questions:

  1. How much service do individuals receive at each age, and of what quality?
  2. Do older people receive lower intensity care and/or care that is less state-of-the-art than their younger counterparts?
  3. If yes, How large is the age-gap in treatment for a given condition, and how has it changed over time? Are there gains (or potential gains} in quality of life when older patients obtain costly procedures?
  4. What have been the drivers of the differences (if any): co-morbidities, general health status, etc.?
  5. How has medical innovation affected total health care expenditure and its increased concentration on older patients?

Description: Data for respondents to the National Population Health Survey (1996-1997 cycle) and to the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 1.1 (2000-2001 ), cycle 2.1 (2003) and cycle 3.1 (2005) will be linked to administrative information on diagnoses, expenditures, and procedures received by those respondents who visited physicians or stayed in hospitals. Only those cases where informed consent was received from survey respondents will be linked.

Three administrative databases will be used in this research project: 1) Medical ServicesFiles based on Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP) claims for the years 1994-1995 to 2009-2010; 2) Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) In-Patients for the years 1994-1995 to 2009-2010; and Day Procedures for the years from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003; and 3) National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) Day Procedures for the years 2003-2004 to 2009-2010. The databases were made available by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHL TC) to Statistics Canada, who will do the linkage.

The data will be linked using a deterministic matching on an encrypted health number. A validation procedure, carried out by the MOHL TC, has made sure only valid health card numbers for NPHS and CCHS records are found on the cohort file, and are encrypted. Health card numbers have been similarly encrypted on the health administrative data files. Personal identifiers will be removed from the files and a number assigned by Statistics Canada will be appended to records in the administrative databases, that link to CCHS and NPHS records.

The study is part of a pilot project between Statistics Canada, the MOHLTC and McMaster University, aimed at enhancing access to Ontario health information by the research community. The creation of an analytical file, as well as the aggregation and analysis of the data, will be carried out in the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre at McMaster University.

Output: Only aggregate data and analysis conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released. Results of the research will be presented at conferences, appear as research papers, and be submitted to journals of health economics for possible publication. Statistics Canada will retain the linked files for a period of five years, that is, until December 31, 2016, after which they will be destroyed.

Study of Mortality Among North American Women in the Synthetic Rubber Industry, 1950-2002- Extension of Retention Period

Purpose: This study, the Canadian portion of a North American investigation, seeks to link the records of approximately 2,400 female synthetic rubber workers to the 1950 to 2002 Canadian Mortality Database (CMDB). It will, for the first time, evaluate the overall cause-specific mortality experience of female workers in the synthetic rubber industry, relative to that of general population groups within Canada and the United States. Previous studies of male synthetic rubber workers have shown that relatively high exposure to the chemical 1,3-butadiene (BD) was positively associated with leukemia mortality. Results from these previous studies have been used by regulatory agencies in the United States and Canada to reduce the permissible exposure level (PEL) of BD in the workplace. Results have also been used to implement manufacturing controls in the areas of polymer manufacturing and petroleum refining, benefiting not only workers, but the public in general.

Description: The Polysar cohort file containing name, date of birth, sex, last known residence, dates of employment hire and termination will be linked to the 1984-2003 summary tax file, using the Social Insurance Number, in order to determine the vital status of the workers. No income data will be used from this file. A random Statistics Canada number will be assigned to each individual record. The final stage of the linkage process will add the mortality data up to 2002 from the Canadian Mortality Database. The University of Alabama will also provide to Statistics Canada the Polysar work history file. The original study numbers will be removed from this file; a Statistics Canada random number will be assigned. Both files will be returned to researchers at the University of Alabama, who will then append the work history file to the Polysar cohort file using the Statistics Canada random number.

Output: An analysis file without names or identifiers will be released to the University of Alabama with the written consent of the provincial and territorial vital statistics registrars. Results from this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals, and a final written report will be presented to the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers, Inc.

The linked file, stripped of all identifiers, will be retained until January 2021. The extension of the retention period of the linked file for this study was approved given the researcher's plan to update the study and integrate it with the male counterpart study with the same retention period.

Workers in the Synthetic Rubber Industry: Mortality Follow-up, 1950 to 2009

Purpose: To determine the health risks associated with exposure to chemicals and processes used in the production of synthetic rubber at the Lanxess (formerly Polysar) plant in Sarnia, Ontario. This study is the Canadian component of a North American investigation. Previous studies of workers in the synthetic rubber industry have shown that work in jobs entailing relatively high exposure to the chemical 1,3-butadiene (BD) was positively associated with leukemia mortality. This current study seeks to link the records of approximately 9,000 male and female synthetic rubber workers to the 1950 to 2009 Canadian Mortality Database. It will evaluate the overall cause-specific mortality experience of workers in the synthetic rubber industry, relative to that of general population groups within Canada and the United States. Similar studies have been conducted in the past and the new results will enhance the findings of the previous investigations, thus increasing the statistical certainty with regards to the conclusions of the study. Results may be useful for risk assessment and regulatory actions by federal, provincial/territorial and state agencies in Canada, the United States and other countries, which would benefit current and future workers in the synthetic rubber industry through process changes and the reduction of hazardous exposures.

Description: The Lanxess cohort file, consisting of approximately 9,000 employees who worked at the Sarnia plant (men who worked for one year or more between January 1, 1943 and December 31, 1991, and women employed one day or more between August 20, 1940 and December 31, 2004) will be linked to the 1984 to 2008 historic tax summary file which does not contain income data. This linkage is carried out to assist in the evaluation of the death search by determining the status of the individuals (dead, alive or emigrated) at the end of the study period. The cohort file will then be linked to the 1950 to 2009 Canadian Mortality Database using probabilistic record linkage methods.

Output: A mortality analysis file linkable to the work history file of the study cohort, without names and personal identifiers, will be disclosed to the principal investigator at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, with the written consent of the provincial and territorial vital statistics registrars. Results from this study will be published in peerreviewed journals, and a final written report will be submitted to the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers, Inc. and the American Chemistry Council. All published information will be in the form of aggregate data conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act. The analysis file and linkage key files will be retained by Statistics Canada until December 31, 2021 or until they are no longer required, at which point they will be destroyed.

Sherritt International Mortality Study: 1954-2003 Update – Extension of Retention Period

Purpose: This study has the potential of directing the industry to the safest process for refining nickel, thereby protecting the health of current and future nickel workers. It will evaluate the risks of developing lung and nasal sinus cancer, among a group of workers exposed to nickel concentrate dust and metallic nickel powder at Sherritt nickel refining facilities in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. Previous studies of the group of workers hired between 1954 and 1978 found no association between exposure to metallic nickel and the development of lung or nasal sinus cancers. Updating the analysis using more current mortality data and including a second cohort of workers hired between 1978 and 1994 will enhance and refine the measures used in the study, as well as the statistical certainty with regards to its conclusions.

Description: The Sherritt International Corporation files for this group of workers, containing the name, sex, data of birth, last known residence, dates of employment hire and termination, will be linked to the 1984-2003 summary tax files. No income data ill
be used from this tax file. This is only done to assist in the evaluation of the death search by determining the status of the individuals (dead, alive or emigrated). This portion of the linkage will be done deterministically using the Social Insurance Number and validated with names and date of birth. The final stage of the linkage process will add the mortality data up to 2003 from the Canadian Mortality Database.

Output: Aggregate tables, conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act, will be released to Sherritt International Corporation who will carry out the analysis. The study's findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. A report and communication will be presented to Sherritt Gordon management and union representatives, to Sherritt Gordon employees, to the Strathcona County Medical Officer of Health, Alberta Occupational Health Department and to the local media. Results of the study will also be presented to the Nickel Institute for distribution to the industry and regulatory agencies worldwide.

The linked file, stripped of all identifiers, will be retained until December 2016. The extension of the retention period of the linked file was approved given Sherritt International Corporation's intention to request an update to this study.

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