Annual Report 
Privacy 2014-2015


Introduction

The Privacy Act gives Canadian citizens and people living in Canada the right to access their personal information being held by federal government institutions. The Act also protects against unauthorized disclosure of that personal information, and it strictly controls how the government collects, uses, stores, discloses, and disposes of any personal information.

The Annual Report on the Administration of the Privacy Act is prepared and submitted, in accordance with section 72 of the Act, and it covers the period from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015. The report is tabled in Parliament.

Administration of the Privacy Act

The Privacy Act, which concerns itself with personal information, stipulates that government institutions can collect personal information only if it relates to the operation of programs or activities of these institutions. In the case of Statistics Canada, the Statistics Act provides the authority to collect personal information for statistical purposes. The privacy legislation demands that government institutions inform those from whom information is collected about the purpose of the collection. In addition, institutions are required to protect the collected information from disclosure.

The administration of the privacy legislation within Statistics Canada is the responsibility of the Office of the Chief Statistician of Canada. The Chief of Staff is the Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator for the Agency.

Organization and mandate of Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada's mandate derives primarily from the Statistics Act. The Act requires that the Agency collect, compile, analyze and publish statistical information on the economic, social, and general conditions of the country and its citizens. The Act also requires that Statistics Canada coordinate the national statistical system, in particular, to avoid duplication in the information collected by government. To this end, the Chief Statistician may enter into joint data collection or sharing agreements with provincial and territorial statistical agencies, as well as with federal, provincial and territorial government departments, pursuant to the provisions of the Act.

The Statistics Act specifically requires Statistics Canada to conduct a Census of Population and a Census of Agriculture every five years. The Act also gives the Agency substantial powers to request information for statistical purposes through surveys of Canadian businesses and households. By default, response to Statistics Canada's surveys is mandatory under the Act; refusal to participate is subject to legal penalties. The Act includes provisions to make participation in data collection voluntary, and Statistics Canada has generally done so with household data collection other than the Census of Population and the Labour Force Survey. The Census of Agriculture and most other business surveys are mandatory.

By law, Statistics Canada can also access administrative records, including personal and business tax data, customs declarations, and birth and death records. Such records are critical sources of statistical information that enable the Agency to reduce the reporting burden on businesses and individual respondents. Statistics Canada is considered a leader among the world's statistical agencies in reducing reporting burden by using administrative data.

These mechanisms help Statistics Canada to fulfill its commitment of ensuring that Canadians have all the key information on Canada's economy, society and environment that they require to function effectively as citizens and decision-makers in a rapidly evolving world.

Delegation instrument

The delegation instrument exercises the powers and functions of the Minister as the head of a government institution, pursuant to section 72 of the Privacy Act. The current detailed list of authorities under the Privacy Act has been formally delegated by the Minister of Industry (Appendix A) as of August 2013 and provides full delegated authority to the Chief Statistician of Canada, the Chief of Staff and the Director of the Information Management Division.

Resources

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office operates with an allocation of 2.85 persons per year. The Departmental Secretary along with the Director of the Information Management Division have been delegated most of the responsibilities. A Senior Access to Information and Privacy Project Manager and a Senior Access to Information and Privacy Project Officer work full-time in the office.

Statistical report

The statistical report provides aggregate data on the application of the Privacy Act. This information is made public annually in an Info Source Bulletin, which is included with the annual report. The following includes the statistical report on privacy for the current reporting period (Appendix B).

Implementation: Privacy

The Privacy Act has a substantial impact on Statistics Canada, but the impact cannot be measured only by the number of requests processed. While society seeks a broader range of detailed information, it also demands more accountability on the part of government about the collection of personal information and the purposes served by the information. The Agency has taken a number of initiatives to address the privacy challenges this dichotomy raises.

Statistics Canada has internal policies that reflect the basic principles found in the Privacy Act. The Agency's Policy on Informing Survey Respondents requires that all respondents be informed of the expected use of the statistics produced from the survey results, the authority under which the survey is taken, their obligation to respond, the confidentiality protection given to all information collected under the Statistics Act, and any data-sharing arrangements pursuant to the provisions of the Statistics Act.

Statistics Canada also developed the Policy on Record Linkage to respond to concerns of both respondents and privacy advocates on the potential of matching an individual's information gathered from a variety of sources.

These two policies not only support compliance with the letter and the spirit of the Privacy Act, but also demonstrate the Agency's commitment to the protection and appropriate use of the personal information under its control, while still meeting its mandate.

Privacy requests

The Agency received 55 new requests in 2014/2015, and no requests were carried over from the previous reporting period. All 55 requests were completed during the period.

Disposition of requests completed
Disposition of requests completed Total
All disclosed 15
Disclosed in part 13
Nothing disclosed (exempt) 1
Does not exist 20
Abandoned 6
Total 55

For 28 requests, information was disclosed completely or in part. For 20 requests, the information did not exist, and six requests were abandoned by the requestors. The public is the largest privacy client group for Statistics Canada.

In addition to requests from the general public, the Agency receives requests from current and former federal public servants regarding personal or staff relations issues. Statistics Canada responds to a number of requests for personal information through its pension search program. This program provides members of the public with information from their own census records, and from the 1940 National Registration records, to support their applications for pensions, citizenship, passports and other services when other administrative records—such as birth certificates—are required, but no longer exist or were never issued.

Responding to privacy requests involved reviewing more than 1,700 pages, of which nearly 1,300 were released. Eleven requestors received information electronically on CD-ROM, and 28 requestors received the information in paper format, at their request.

Other requests

During this period, Statistics Canada received one Privacy Act consultation request from another department for a total of eight pages.

Disposition of completed requests

The disposition of the 55 requests completed in 2014/2015 was as follows:

  • 15 were fully disclosed (27%)
  • 13 were disclosed in part (24%)
  • 20 had no existing information (36%)
  • 6 were abandoned by applicants (11%)
  • 1 was fully exempted (2%)

Completion time and extensions

All 55 requests completed in 2014/2015 were processed as prescribed by the Act and within the time required. Several factors contributed to Statistics Canada's timely response rate over the past year, including greater oversight at the managerial level and information sessions with officials and sector contacts.

The 55 requests completed in 2014/2015 were processed in the following time frames:

  • 33 within 1 to 15 days (60%)
  • 11 within 16 to 30 days (20%)
  • 11 within 31 to 60 days (20%)

Exemptions invoked

The exemptions used were sections 26 for personal information and 22(1)(b) for the disclosure of which could reasonably be expected to be injurious to the enforcement of any law of Canada.

Costs

In 2014/2015, the ATIP Office incurred an estimated $258,443 in salary costs and $1,972 in costs related to administering the Privacy Act.

Training initiatives for Privacy

In 2014/2015, the ATIP Office provided formal instruction to agency staff on the Privacy Act. Ten training sessions were held, and over 420 people attended.

At the sessions, participants learned about the Act and gained a better understanding of their ATIP obligations. These sessions were given to divisional and management teams in the Economy-wide Statistics Branch, the Health Statistics Division, the Communications Division, the Macroeconomic Accounts Branch, the Administrative Data Division, and several other individual sections across the Agency.

Statistics Canada also requires employees to complete computer-based courses on confidentiality. A mandatory course for new employees provides them with a brief overview of confidentiality, illustrating its importance at Statistics Canada. A second course with similar content must be completed by Statistics Canada employees for renewal of their identification card. For most employees, this occurs every three years. In the current reporting period, a total of 2,202 employees completed these courses.

Policies, guidelines and procedures

During the reporting period, as recommended by the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) and following TBS guidelines, Statistics Canada implemented the project "ATIP online request service." This project was completed at the end of October 2014.

Complaints and investigations

Three new complaints against the Agency were lodged with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC). They were about exemptions and refusal in general. No complaints were carried over from last year.

The OPC ruled that two complaints were unfounded and considered no action required. One complaint is still being examined.

Monitoring of the requests

At Statistics Canada, the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office processes and monitors requests by registering them in a comprehensive system known as Privasoft – Case Management. An acknowledgement of the request is sent to the client, and a retrieval form is forwarded to the relevant program area (Office of Primary Interest (OPI)). If the OPI and/or the ATIP Office need to clarify the request, the ATIP Office contacts the client.

The retrieval form was created by the ATIP Office at Statistics Canada and is based on the Policy on Privacy Protection and the Directive on Privacy Practices from the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada. The form includes the text of the request, the name of the ATIP Officer and his/her phone number, and the date by which records are required (normally 5 to 10 days). The form states that the ATIP Office is required to report annually on the administrative costs related to requests. Thus information is needed on the level(s) and group(s) of those involved in the retrieval and the amount of time spent working on the request (including time for search, retrieval, internal review (relevant or not to the request), and photocopying). The individuals providing the records are asked to identify any records which may be sensitive in nature (e.g., personal information, legal issues), and the Director or Director General of the program area signs the form.

The ATIP Office assists the program areas with the retrieval of records from day one. As 5 to 10 days are allowed for the retrieval, a follow-up is made on the fifth day. If additional time is required for the retrieval, this is when the program area is to notify the ATIP Office. An additional 1 to 5 days may be granted depending on the amount of work remaining. Once the documents are received from the OPI, the ATIP Office ensures that the form is duly completed and that it has been signed by the appropriate manager. The ATIP Office takes 5 to 10 days to review and process the records. Once the work of the ATIP Office is completed, the final version is released to the client. The OPI and management are very aware of the importance of ATIP requests.

Privacy breaches

A standard template is used to document incidents. This template incorporates the elements suggested in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's guidelines on how to respond to a privacy breach. The template has been approved by the Agency's Executive Management Board. At a minimum, the incident report will contain the following information:

  • a description of the incident (who, what, when, where, why, how)
  • the actions already taken and planned for the future
  • a description of the risks/impacts
  • any other information that might be helpful in locating any lost item or in assessing the consequences of loss or compromise
  • recommendations for reducing or eliminating the risk of the event reoccurring in future
  • information on whether the individuals or organizations whose information was breached were informed of the incident
  • rationale for not informing the individuals or the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC), should this course of action be taken.

"Best practices" to eliminate or reduce future recurrences that are identified during an investigation must be communicated to other employees in order to prevent a recurrence of the breach.

There were eight privacy breaches at Statistics Canada during the reporting period. A total of 238 people and four households, with an unknown number of individuals within these households, were affected by these eight breaches. None of these breaches is known to have led to criminal activity.

Four material breaches were reported to the OPC, affecting a total of two individuals and four households, with an unknown number of individuals within these households. In the cases of all four material breaches and three non-material breaches, efforts were made to inform individuals of the breach. For the remaining non-material breach involving a file provided to a federal department which included 230 records for individuals who had not consented to data sharing, the individuals were not informed as there were no direct identifiers and there was geographic dispersal of records in the file.

Statistics Canada has implemented a number of additional measures specific to the areas which experienced the breach, including the following:

  • training for employees and managers in multiple divisions
  • review of procedures and systems.

Privacy impact assessments

The Statistics Canada Directive on Conducting Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) specifies the roles and responsibilities of its senior managers and privacy specialists in the Information Management Division with regard to the collection, use and dissemination of personal information. This directive applies to all statistical and non-statistical programs that engage in the collection, use or dissemination of personal information.

In 2006, Statistics Canada developed the Generic Privacy Impact Assessment for Statistics Canada Surveys (updated in 2009), which covers the majority of the Agency's household and business surveys conducted under the authority of the Statistics Act. The generic PIA addresses the ten privacy principles, and includes a threat and risk assessment that focuses on the Agency's major data collection methodologies, such as computer-assisted interviewing, self-enumeration, and electronic data reporting. This document is posted on the Statistics Canada website (www.statcan.gc.ca).

Statistics Canada is in the process of rewriting its generic PIA. In addition to updating information that has changed since the last review, the next version will expand the scope of the generic PIA. Whereas the current generic PIA focussed primarily on data collection for Statistics Canada's statistical programs (as the privacy risks associated with collection are far more significant than those involved in other statistical operations), the revised PIA will cover all aspects of all statistical programs.

For all new and significantly redesigned collections, uses or disclosures of personal information that raise unique or additional privacy, confidentiality or security risks, a specific privacy impact assessment is produced.

Privacy impact assessments are also conducted for new or redesigned administrative programs and services that involve the collection, use and disclosure of personal information.

In the current reporting period, specific PIAs were approved for the 2014 Census Program Test, 2014 Ontario Child Health Study, Social Data Linkage Environment, My StatCan and Online Discussion Platforms, and the New Dissemination Model Online Beta Consultation. Copies of these PIAs were sent to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and Treasury Board Secretariat.

Summaries of completed privacy impact assessments can be found at the following page of Statistics Canada's website: Privacy impact assessments. The following are brief descriptions:

2014 Census Program Test

The 2014 Census Program Test privacy impact assessment (PIA) identified the privacy risks and associated mitigation measures for the 2014 Census Program Test, including a content test associated with the mandatory census questionnaire and the voluntary National Household Survey (NHS), as well as a field procedures test to validate modifications to the associated field procedures.

The 2014 Census Program Test is designed to evaluate the impact of content changes on data quality, paper questionnaire format and usability, and the functionality and usability of electronic questionnaire applications, and to validate intended system functionality through a live test to observe the behaviour of staff when using the new systems, procedures and tools.

The PIA concluded that appropriate mitigation measures have been implemented or are planned and that remaining risks were either negligible or were such that Statistics Canada was prepared to accept and manage the risk.

2014 Ontario Child Health Study

The 2014 Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS) is a research study of the mental health of children and youth living in families and neighbourhoods throughout Ontario. The target population included all families with children and adolescents aged 4 to 17 years whose usual place of residence is a private household in the province of Ontario.

The Statistics Canada generic privacy impact assessment addressed many of the privacy aspects related to the survey. The specific PIA addressed the following privacy concerns: data collection from children, potentially sensitive questions, longitudinal data collection and length of interview.

The assessment concluded that, with the existing Statistics Canada safeguards, any remaining risks either were negligible or were such that Statistics Canada was prepared to accept and manage the risk.

Social Data Linkage Environment

The Social Data Linkage Environment (SDLE) builds on past record linkage experience to make possible a program of pan-Canadian socio-economic record linkage research. A well structured and regulated program of record linkage is required to: a) increase the relevance of existing Statistics Canada surveys without the need to collect new data or re-collect data held by other data sources; b) maintain the relevance of longitudinal surveys that have been terminated; c) substantially increase the use of administrative data; d) replace or supplement existing data collection programs in the social domain; and e) maintain the highest data privacy and security standards.

The PIA did not identify any outstanding issues relating to confidentiality or security and concluded that, with the mitigation measures that have been put in place, any remaining risks either were negligible or were such that Statistics Canada was prepared to accept and manage the risk.

My StatCan and Online Discussion Platforms

"My StatCan," which replaced the "My Account" feature, provides visitors to the Statistics Canada website with the option to receive email notifications when products of interest are released. My StatCan includes the following key features: increased access to Statistics Canada information, a more efficient email notification system, and a one-stop registration for all online interactions with Statistics Canada.

Participants are asked to provide a user name (alias) and their email address, which may be used to correspond with them if required, and indicate by checking a box whether they wish to participate in Statistics Canada's future consultations. All questions and comments posted are subject to moderation to ensure that the rules of engagement are followed and that no personal information is disclosed.

The assessment of "My StatCan" did not identify any privacy risks that could not be managed by using existing safeguards.

New Dissemination Model Online Beta Consultation

As part of the New Dissemination Model, Statistics Canada launched a beta website for the purpose of engaging and seeking further input from Canadians by inviting them to discuss, comment on, and rate features of the beta website.

Participants were asked to provide a user name (alias) and their email address, which may be used to correspond with them if required. All comments posted were subject to moderation to ensure that the rules of engagement are followed and that no personal information is disclosed.

The PIA for the New Dissemination Model Online Beta Consultation did not identify any privacy risks that could not be managed by using existing safeguards.

Record linkage

As outlined in Statistics Canada's Directive on Record Linkage, linkages of different records pertaining to the same individual are carried out only for statistical purposes and only in cases where the public good is clearly evident and outweighs the invasion of the privacy of individuals. One of the primary objectives of these linkages is to produce statistical information that facilitates a better understanding of the Canadian society, economy and environment.

All record linkage proposals must satisfy a prescribed review process as outlined in the directive. In addition to demonstrating the public benefit, each submission must provide details of the output, frequency, and retention of files and identifiers. Any retention of personal identifiers requires that the file be registered with Treasury Board as a Personal Information Bank (PIB) and a description published in Info Source. The public dissemination of any information resulting from record linkages, as for all other statistical information, is only at an aggregate level; this protects the confidentiality of the information of individuals.

In 2014/2015, there were 12 approved record linkages that involved personal information. A summary of these record linkages is found in Appendix C.

Types of disclosure under subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act

Subsection 8(2) of the Act describes the circumstances under which personal information may be disclosed without the consent of the individual to whom the information pertains. Although this disclosure of personal information is discretionary, it is subject to any other Act of Parliament. In the case of Statistics Canada, the Statistics Act provides a statutory prohibition against disclosure of identifiable information, without the knowledge and consent of the individual concerned. Therefore, personal information collected under the Statistics Act cannot be disclosed pursuant to subsection 8(2).

In the case of personal information, in records held by Statistics Canada, and subject only to the Privacy Act (i.e., those of employees and contractors), disclosures under subsection 8(2) can occur in certain circumstances: for the purpose for which information is obtained or compiled by the institution, for a use consistent with the purpose described in personal information banks registered to Statistics Canada, or for the purpose of complying with subpoenas, warrants, court orders and rules of court.

Paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Act allows for disclosures of personal information in the public interest, and Paragraph 8(2)(e) allows for disclosures of personal information "to an investigative body…for the purpose of enforcing any law." During the reporting period, Statistics Canada did not disclose any personal information under subsections 8(2)(m) or/and 8(2)(e) of the Privacy Act.

Appendix A

Access to Information and Privacy Acts Delegation Order

The Minister of Industry, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers and functions of the Minister as the head of Statistics Canada, under the section of the Act set out in the schedule opposite each position. This designation replaces all previous delegation Orders.

Schedule

Schedule
Position Access to Information Act and Regulations Privacy Act and Regulations
Chief Statistician of Canada Full authority Full authority
Chief of Staff, Office of the Chief Statistician Full authority Full authority
Director, Information Management Division Full authority Full authority
Departmental Secretary Sections: 7(a), 7(b), 8(1), 9, 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6), 12(2)(b), 12(3)(b), 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 22.1, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27(1), 27(4), 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4), 33, 35(2)(b), 68, 69, 71(1)
Regulations:
Sections: 6(1), 7(2), 7(3), 8, 8.1
Sections: 8(2)(j), 8(2)(m), 8(4), 8(5), 9(1),9(4), 10, 14, 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b), 18(2), 19(1), 19(2), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 70
Regulations:
Sections: 9, 11(2), 11(4), 13(1), 14
Senior Access to Information and Privacy Project Manager Sections: 7(a), 8(1), 9, 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6), 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27(1), 27(4), 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4), 68, 69, 71(1)
Regulations:
Sections: 6(1), 7(1), 7(2), 7(3), 8, 8.1
Sections: 8(2)(j), 8(2)(m), 10, 14, 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b), 18(2), 19(1), 19(2), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 70
Regulations:
Sections: 9, 11(2), 11(4), 13(1), 14
Senior Access to Information and Privacy Project Officer Sections: 7(a), 8(1), 9, 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6), 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27(1), 27(4), 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4), 68, 69, 71(1)
Regulations:
Sections: 6(1), 7(1), 7(2), 7(3), 8, 8.1
Sections: 8(2)(j), 8(2)(m), 10, 14, 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b), 18(2), 19(1), 19(2), 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 70
Regulations:
Sections: 9, 11(2), 11(4), 13(1), 14

The original version was signed by
The Honourable James Moore
Minister of Industry
Dated, at the City of Ottawa
August 16, 2013

Appendix B

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Statistics Canada

Reporting period: 01/04/2014 to 31/03/2015

Part 1 - Requests under the Privacy Act

Requests under the Privacy Act
  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 55
Outstanding from previous reporting period 0
Total 55
Closed during reporting period 55
Carried over to next reporting period 0

Part 2 – Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Table summary
This table displays the results of 2.1 Disposition and completion time. The information is grouped by Disposition of requests (appearing as row headers), Completion Time (appearing as column headers).
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
All disclosed 10 2 3 0 0 0 0 15
Disclosed in part 3 6 4 0 0 0 0 13
All exempted 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 14 3 3 0 0 0 0 20
Request abandoned 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 33 11 11 0 0 0 0 55
2.2 Exemptions
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 5
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 14
27 0
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1) 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 15 5 0
Disclosed in part 13 6 0
Total 28 11 0
2.5 Complexity
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 150 150 15
Disclosed in part 1,588 1,143 13
All exempted 10 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 6
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
Total 1,748 1,293 35
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Table summary
This table displays the results of 2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests. The information is grouped by Disposition (appearing as row headers), Less than 100 pages processed, 101-500 pages processed, 501-1000 pages processed, 1001-5000 pages processed and More than 5000 pages processed (appearing as column headers).
Disposition Less than 100
pages processed
101-500
pages processed
501-1,000
pages processed
1,001-5,000
pages processed
More than 5,000
pages processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 15 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 9 394 4 749 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 31 544 4 749 0 0 0 0 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 2 0 0 2
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 2 0 0 2
2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Table summary
This table displays the Reasons for not meeting statutory deadlines. The information is grouped by Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline (appearing as row headers) and Principal Reason (appearing as column headers).
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
0 0 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
2.7 Requests for translation
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 - Disclosures under subsection 8(2) and 8(5)

Disclosures under subsection 8(2) and 8(5)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Paragraph 8(5) Total
0 0 0 0

Part 4 - Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Disposition for Correction Requests Received Number
Notations attached 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Total 0

Part 5 - Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Table summary
This table displays the results of Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests. The information is grouped by Disposition of requests where an extension was taken (appearing as row headers), 15(a)(i) Interference with operations, 15(a)(ii) Consultation and 15(b) Translation or conversion (appearing as column headers).
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i)
Interference with
operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or
conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 3 0 3 0
Disclosed in part 4 0 4 0
All exempted 1 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 3 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 11 0 7 0
5.2 Length of extensions
5.2 Length of extensions
Table summary
This table displays the Length of extensions. The information is grouped by Length of extensions (appearing as row headers), 15(a)(i) Interference with operations, 15(a)(ii) Consultation and 15(b) Translation or conversion (appearing as column headers).
Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with
operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or
conversion
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 11 0 7 0
Total 11 0 7 0

Part 6 - Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations
6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations
Consultations Other government of Canada institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 1 8 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 1 8 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 1 8 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
Table summary
This table displays the Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions. The information is grouped by Recommendation (appearing as row headers) and Number of days required to complete consultation requests (appearing as column headers).
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Table summary
This table displays the Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations. The information is grouped by Recommendation (appearing as row headers) and Number of days required to complete consultation requests (appearing as column headers).
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15
days
16 to 30
days
31 to 60
days
61 to 120
days
121 to 180
days
181 to 365
days
More than 365
days
Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

7.1 Requests with Legal Services
7.1 Requests with Legal Services
Table summary
This table displays the results of 7.1 Requests with Legal Services. The information is grouped by Number of Days (appearing as row headers), Less than 100 pages processed, 101-500 pages processed, 501-1000 pages processed, 1001-5000 pages processed and More than 5000 pages processed (appearing as column headers).
Number of Days Less than 100
pages processed
101-500
pages processed
501-1,000
pages processed
1,001-5,000
pages processed
More than 5,000
pages processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 t o180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
Table summary
This table displays the results of 7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office. The information is grouped by Number of Days (appearing as row headers), Less than 100 pages processed, 101-500 pages processed, 501-1000 pages processed, 1001-5000 pages processed and More than 5000 pages processed (appearing as column headers).
Number of Days Less than 100
pages processed
101-500
pages processed
501-1,000
pages processed
1,001-5,000
pages processed
More than 5,000
pages processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 t o180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 8 – Complaints and investigations notices received

Part 8 – Complaints and investigations notices received
  Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
Complaints and investigations notices received 3 0 2 0 5

Part 9 - Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Part 8 – Complaints and investigations notices received
  Total
Number of PIA(s) completed 5

Part 10 – Resources related to the Privacy Act

10.1 Costs
10.1 Costs
Table summary
This table displays the Resources related to the Privacy Act. The information is grouped by Expenditures (appearing as row headers) and dollar amount (appearing as column headers).
Expenditures Amount ($)
Salaries 258,443
Overtime 0
Goods and Services 1,972
(Professional services contracts) (0)
(Other) (1,972)
Total 260,415
10.2 Human Resources
10.2 Human Resources
Table summary
This table displays the Human Resources used. The information is grouped by Full-time employees, Part-time and casual employees, Regional staff, Consultants and agency personnel, and Students (appearing as row headers), Dedicated full-time, Dedicated part-time, and Total (appearing as column headers).
Resources Person Years Dedicated to Privacy Activities
Full-time employees 2.85
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00
Students 0.00
Total 2.85

Appendix C

Record linkages

Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) – 2013: Linkage to obtain information on Canadian Forces members' deployment history and medication use (055-2013)

Purpose: The CFMHS is a voluntary survey undertaken on behalf of the Department of National Defence (DND) of both regular members of the Canadian Forces (CF) and reservists who have previously been deployed in support of Canada's mission in Afghanistan. Data collection began April 15, 2013, and concluded August 30, 2013. The survey was designed to meet the key policy data needs of the Directorate of Mental Health outlined by the Canadian Forces Health Services Group at DND.

The objectives of this survey are

  • to assess the mental health status and functioning of CF members on both illness and positive mental health continuums through selected mental disorders, mental health problems, and well-being
  • to assess timely, adequate, and appropriate access to and utilization of formal and informal mental health services and supports as well as perceived needs
  • to evaluate changes in patterns of mental health and service use
  • to evaluate the mental health impact of the CF work environment and deployments.

The objective of the linkage is to enhance response information from the Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) with additional information provided by the Department of National Defence (DND) on deployment history and medication use contained in administrative files. By linking CFMHS responses to administrative records, the accuracy of deployment records and drug identification numbers will be high.

Description: This project involves two key record linkages. The proposed record linkage activities would permit the study on the effects of deployment on mental health as well as medication use. The linkages would consist of:

CFMHS Master file linked to Canadian Forces members' deployment history
These administrative data have been compiled by DND using their Central Computerized Pay System (CCPS) data and Canadian Forces Planning, Tasks and Operations (CFPO) system data. The CCPS data would only be used to determine length of deployment history. No income/wage data would be made available. The CFPO data would be used to determine if and where a deployment took place. If a deployment occurred, the month and year of departure as well as the total number of days deployed for each deployment will be linked.

CFMHS Master file linked to Canadian Forces Pharmacy System
This would be done using medication-use data supplied by DND. Data would be grouped using a classification of medications previously approved for the 2012 mental health component of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). For each of 17 medication groups, DND would provide an indicator of usage as follows: 0 = No use of the medication for the past 12 months (prior to interview date); 1 = Usage in the past 12 months but no current use; 2 = Current use.

Output: The output of the linkage will be a linked analysis file containing all of the CFMHS variables, as well as the above-noted deployment and medication information. Only non-confidential aggregate statistics and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada.

The availability of the linked CFMHS file will be announced in The Daily and made available to researchers at Statistics Canada's Research Data Centres.

Linkage to the Canadian Mortality Database for the purposes of the Perioperative Ischemic Evaluation (POISE Trial) Study (031-2014)

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to inform on the longer-term risks and benefits to the patients at risk of a perioperative cardiovascular event who underwent non-cardiac surgery and who participated in a blinded randomized controlled trial of the drug metoprolol CR versus a placebo.

Description: The POISE Trial was a blinded randomized controlled trial of the drug metoprolol CR versus a placebo of patients at risk of a perioperative cardiovascular event (i.e., patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or with risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease) who underwent non-cardiac surgery. Patients received the study drug two to four hours prior to surgery and subsequently for 30 days. The goal of the current record linkage project is to determine the long-term (i.e., one year) impact of this study intervention. A total of 23 countries participate in POISE. This record linkage involves only the Canadian participants.

A file consisting of records of those 3,539 patients who participated in the study in Canada will be linked by Statistics Canada to the 2002-to-2009 Canadian Mortality Database and to the 1984-to-2012 longitudinal T1 Personal Master File. The longitudinal T1 Personal Master File contains no income data, only information indicating whether individuals were alive or dead (and if dead, the date of death), if they emigrated or immigrated, and if taxes were filed during the study period.

Patients participating in the study signed consent forms granting the principal investigator consent for linkage of their records to mortality information.

Output: No analysis or publication of the results of this linkage will be conducted by Statistics Canada. A mortality output file will be produced, containing the clinical trial study number, complete date of death (month, day and year) and cause(s) of death.

The mortality output file will be split by province or territory of death, and the records will be sent to the appropriate vital statistics registrars, who, at their discretion, will release the information to the principal investigator at McMaster University.

The principal investigator has undertaken to publish the study findings in the form of aggregate statistical outputs that will not result in the identification of individual patients. Results of the analysis of the data will be presented at medical meetings, and papers will be submitted to peer-reviewed medical journals for publication.

Access at Statistics Canada to the identifiers, linking keys and mortality output files will be restricted to employees whose assigned work requires such access. At no time will the information from the longitudinal T1 Personal Master File leave Statistics Canada, except in the form of aggregate tables. The linkage key file and mortality output file will be retained until no longer required, up to December 31, 2019, at which time these files will be destroyed.

Longitudinal and International Study of Adults: Business Register Linkage (044-2014)

Purpose: To improve the quality of the data collected for the survey and to reduce response burden and survey costs.

The Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) currently captures North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes for the primary employer of respondents who are currently employed, and for the most recent employer of respondents who are not currently employed.

The linkage of NAICS codes from the Business Register to LISA T4 data would improve the amount of data available on a respondent's industry of work when compared to his or her T4 information, as it would provide NAICS codes for all employers, rather than just the most recent employer.

The linkages will add retrospective data on industry of employment for all paid work for which respondents receive a T4, which complements retrospective education, family and work already collected in the survey.

Description: Data linkages will be made for all respondents (excluding those who object to the linkage statement). Business number (BN), the legal name of the business, a flag indicating if the business has multiple operations/locations/provinces, the province(s) of operation, NAICS code(s), and the legal code (indicating the primary industry of the business) for all employers will be retrieved from the Business Register file.

A linkage will be made to T4 data for each collection year of the survey, and all previous calendar years going back to 2000. Only Statistics Canada employees directly involved in data processing in Income Statistics Division (ISD) will have access to the annual files and the linking key file containing personal identifiers.

Output: The linked file will be outputted as a microdata file (all personal and business identifiers will be removed) and will be maintained, stored and retained in a secure location by ISD. This file will be retained indefinitely. A separate linking key file containing personal and business identifiers used in the administrative file linkage will be held in a different, secure location, and retained until it is no longer needed for the processing of the survey data, after which it will be destroyed. All information released outside of Statistics Canada will conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act.

Extension of retention period; 2013 General Social Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating: Linking tax data from the T1 Personal File, T1 Family File and T4 Summary and Supplementary file (047-2014)

Purpose: This amendment is to the previously approved record linkage 045-2013. There is no change to the proposal other than the extension of the retention period.

The General Social Survey (GSS) program, established in 1985, conducts telephone surveys from a sample selected across the 10 provinces (excluding the territories). The GSS is recognized for its regular collection of cross-sectional data that allow for trend analysis, and its capacity to test and develop new concepts that address emerging issues. Each year the GSS focuses on a different topic, such as family, victimization, social support and aging, and time use. A specific topic is usually repeated approximately every five years. The 2013 GSS will focus on giving, volunteering and participating (GVP).

The 2013 GSS on GVP is the fifth iteration of a series of surveys that began with the 1997 National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP). This survey is the result of a unique partnership of federal government departments and non-profit and voluntary organizations that includes Imagine Canada, Canadian Heritage, Health Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and Volunteer Canada.

Previous iterations were overseen by the Special Surveys Division. The survey is now developed and conducted by the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division. This survey is an important source of information on Canadian contributory behaviour, including giving, volunteering and participating.

By linking the 2013 GSS on GVP responses to personal tax files of respondents, and the tax files of all household members, more accurate income (personal and household) and claimed tax credits for charitable donations information will be obtained for respondents. At the same time, response burden will be minimized, and collection, data processing, and testing costs will be reduced.

Description: The 2013 GSS on GVP is a sample-based survey with a cross-sectional design. Telephone surveys are conducted through computer-assisted telephone interviews from a sample selected across the 10 Canadian provinces.

By linking data, we are aiming to obtain better-quality data for income (personal and household) and tax credit information claimed for charitable donations.

Questions relating to income show rather high non-response rates. The incomes reported by respondents are usually rough estimates and donor imputation is used for partial and item non-response.

Since respondents do not always complete their own tax reports, it can be difficult for them to remember if they claimed a tax credit in their most recent tax report. Linking will allow getting such information without having to ask questions.

The information collected during the 2013 GSS on GVP will be linked to the personal tax records (T1, T1FF or T4) of respondents, and tax records of all household members. Respondents will be notified of the planned linkage before and during the survey. Any respondents who object to the linkage of their data will have their objections recorded, and no linkage to their tax data will take place.

Output: The availability of the 2013 GSS on GVP analytical data file will be announced in The Daily. The analysis file will be made available to Statistics Canada researchers, and to deemed employees at the Statistics Canada Research Data Centres. All data will remain confidential and protected under the Statistics Act.

Along with the availability announcement of the analytical data file (in The Daily), only non-confidential aggregate statistics will be released.

Re-contact with the Saskatchewan justice system (052-2014)

Purpose: To determine the types of unique information required to create and support high quality indicators of re-contact within and across three criminal justice sectors. Whereas "contact" is defined as a documented official intervention (e.g., charge) against a person by a criminal justice agency/organization, a "re-contact" is defined as a subsequent contact signifying a new, official intervention by the agency/organization during a specified follow-up period.

The project will attempt to establish baseline metrics on re-contact with the justice system, which can serve as a comparison group for assessing the impact of policies and programs that may be implemented in a particular jurisdiction. It will also provide the potential to be able to track emerging patterns of re-contact, which may appear to be unique within a jurisdiction at a local level yet are more systematic in nature when evaluated at a higher level (e.g., national) of analysis.

Description: The record linkage will be used to support the development of re-contact indicators within and across the policing, courts and corrections sectors of justice.

The linkage will use records from three microdata surveys including those collected under the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), the Integrated Criminal Court Survey (ICCS) and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS).

The linkage will also use supplemental personal identifiers as provided by several municipal police services in Saskatchewan and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the years January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2013; the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice and Attorney General for the fiscal years 2006/2007 to 2012/2013; and the Saskatchewan Ministry of Corrections for the fiscal years 2006/2007 to 2012/2013.

Output: Only non-confidential aggregate statistics and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Access to linking keys and linked analysis files will be restricted to Statistics Canada employees whose assigned work activities require such access.

High-level and non-confidential findings may be reported in the form of presentations to various National Justice Statistics Initiative partners.

Statistics Canada will retain the linked analysis files until no longer required, up to March 31, 2017, at which time the linked analysis files will be destroyed.

Census of Agriculture Linkage to Taxation Data: 064-2014

Purpose: The Census of Agriculture and taxation data linkage will provide additional information to validate (and impute if necessary) total farm revenues and expenses, and to improve data quality of data in other parts of the questionnaire. Another application of the taxation data will be to identify new farms ("births" units) that had filed a tax declaration with the Canada Revenue Agency but were not yet present on the most up-to-date version of the Business Register prior to Census of Agriculture day.

The proposed linkage builds on the feasibility study undertaken for the linkage of the 2011 Census of Agriculture and taxation data. The feasibility study showed that by using taxation data in place of farmers' responses to the Census of Agriculture questionnaire in production, Statistics Canada would be able to significantly reduce their response burden.

Description: Statistics Canada will link farm business taxation data from the Statement of Farming Activities of T1 and T3 taxfilers and the income statement and balance sheet information for T2 filers, as well as the T4 Summary report, to the Censuses of Agriculture, starting with the 2014 Census of Agriculture Test.

Output: Linkage results of the 2016 Census of Agriculture may be disseminated. The linkage will be used to validate total farm revenue and expenses, and other content associated with these expense variables, and to identify new farms.

Upon project approval from the Treasury Board Secretariat, a new record linkage application for 2021 and beyond will seek approval to disseminate detailed farm operating expenses, delivering high-quality taxation replacement data.

Statistics Canada will retain the Census of Agriculture years and the Census of Agriculture Test years linked analysis files until no longer required, up to three years after linkage, at which time they will be destroyed.

Longitudinal Apprentices and Trades Qualifiers Database (065-2014)

Purpose: This initiative will create a set of linkable data files containing information on individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs in Canada since 2002. The linkable data files will be used to examine issues pertaining to the completion of apprenticeship programs and the mobility and outcomes of apprentices and trades qualifiers.

Description: The sample for the linkage data files comprises of individuals who were enrolled in apprenticeship programs, including trades qualifiers. Sociodemographic information on individuals, the apprenticeship program in which they are registered, and their status in the program, will be drawn from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) for the years from 2002 onward. This information will be linked to various administrative databases. Specifically, job-level information will be drawn from the T4 file, individual-level information from the T1 Family File, T1 Personal Master File, T1 Historical File, T4E file, Employment Insurance Status Vector file, Record of Employment file, and Longitudinal Immigration Data file, and firm-level information from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.

Business numbers (BNs) and social insurance numbers (SINs) will be transformed into unique identifiers that will remain on the linkable files to facilitate longitudinal analyses. All BNs, SINs and personal identifiers will be removed from the analytical files and stored in a separate location accessible only to Statistics Canada employees whose job duties require them to access this information.

Output: Methodological and analytical findings resulting from these linked data will be used to prepare research papers for publication in analytical reports, peer-reviewed scientific journals and CANSIM, and for presentation at conferences, workshops and meetings.

Only aggregate statistics and analysis conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada.

Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA): Linkage to the Longitudinal Immigrant Database (IMDB) Landing File component (077-2014)

Purpose: To improve the quality of the data collected for the survey and to reduce response burden and survey costs.

The LISA is a voluntary, multi-topic, longitudinal, socioeconomic survey of households. The survey was designed to meet the key policy data needs of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) in the domains of education and training, family health, income and employment. The results will inform all levels of government as they develop services to better meet the challenges of Canada's society and economy in the 21st century. Researchers, educators, learning institutions and organizations will also use the results of the survey to develop more effective policies, services and programs for the people most in need.

By linking the LISA respondents to the IMDB Landing File component, data from the time of immigration will be obtained for immigrant respondents. At the same time, response burden and respondent fatigue will be minimized. The linkage will add data that complement the education, family, work and income information collected.

Description: LISA includes every member of a selected household. The information collected on the LISA survey will be linked to each household member's IMDB landing information, when it exists. The data will be linked for the duration of the LISA survey (which has no pre-determined number of collection waves), or until the respondent is no longer participating in the survey.

Respondents to LISA are currently informed of the potential for future linkages. Any respondents who object to the linkage will have their objection recorded and no linkage to the IMDB will take place.

Output: The linked file, with all personal identifiers removed, will be maintained, stored and retained in a secure location by Income Statistics Division. This file will be retained indefinitely. A separate linking key file containing personal identifiers used in the administrative file linkage will be held in a different secure location, and retained until the completion of processing of the final wave of the survey, after which it will be destroyed.

All information released outside of Statistics Canada will conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act.

Creation of a Derived Record Depository and Key Registry for the Purposes of the Social Data Linkage Environment (085-2014)

Purpose: The Social Data Linkage Environment (SDLE) builds on past record linkage experience to make possible a program of pan-Canadian socioeconomic record linkage research. A well structured and regulated program of record linkage will increase the relevance of existing Statistics Canada surveys; substantially increase the use of administrative data; facilitate the integration of data from various social domains, such as health, education, justice and income, thereby increasing the ability to analyze the impact of social determinants from any of these domains on the outcomes in other domains; reduce the burden on survey respondents by reusing already collected data; and maintain the highest data privacy and security standards.

A Derived Record Depository (DRD) and separate Key Registry will be created to reduce privacy risks and to improve the efficiency and quality of the linkages. Statistics Canada is responsible for securely storing and processing data files and for producing analysis files needed to carry out approved research studies. SDLE research projects will involve the use of linked records, and in accordance with Statistics Canada's Directive on Record Linkage, approval by the Chief Statistician is required for each new linkage project.

Description: The DRD is created by linking various Statistics Canada data files for the purpose of producing a list of unique individuals. Each individual in the DRD is assigned an anonymous SDLE identifier. The identifier is randomly assigned and has no value outside of the SDLE. Some of the data files used for the DRD include the Census of Population and National Household Survey, T1 Personal Master Files (Tax), Canadian Child Tax Benefits files, Vital Statistics – Birth Database, Vital Statistics – Death Database, the Landed Immigrant File and the Indian Registry. Future updates to these files will be used for further updates to the DRD.

The DRD would initially be comprised of the following personal identifiers: surnames, given names, date of birth, sex, marital status, date of landing/immigration, date of emigration, date of death, social insurance numbers (SINs), temporary taxation numbers (TTNs), dependant identification numbers (DINs), spouse's SIN/TTN, dependant or disabled individual's SIN/TTN/DIN, parent's SIN/TTN, health information numbers, addresses, Address Registry Unique Identifier, Standard Geographical Classification Code, telephone numbers, spouse's surname, mother's surname, father's surname, alternate surname, and a Statistics Canada–generated sequential identification number for each individual identified through the annual DRD linkage process. Access to the DRD will be restricted to the Statistics Canada employees responsible for its development and maintenance.

Linkage of the DRD to administrative and survey databases held by Statistics Canada will be performed in a dedicated social-domain record linkage environment (the "SDLE"). To ensure a high level of data security and privacy, the association of Statistics Canada–generated identification numbers from the DRD and the administrative and survey database record identifiers will be stored in a separate Key Registry, thus avoiding the need to store survey data with personal identifiers. For analytical studies, the associated SDLE identifiers and the record identifiers will be used to link an individual's records within and among the databases in the SDLE. All such analytical studies will require prior linkage approval from Statistics Canada's Executive Management Board. Access to the Key Registry will be restricted to the Statistics Canada employees responsible for its development and maintenance and those responsible for the creation of linked analysis data files.

The Key Registry will contain linkage keys to permit linkage for approved studies to data files held at Statistics Canada. Some of these files include but are not limited to

  • T1 Personal Master Files
  • Canadian Child Tax Benefits files
  • Longitudinal Immigration Database
  • Vital Statistics birth and death databases
  • sample portion of Census of Population (1991 onward)
  • National Household Survey (2011 onward)
  • National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth
  • Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada
  • Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics
  • Youth in Transition Survey
  • National Population Health Survey
  • T1 Family File
  • Clinical administrative databases (inpatient and outpatient hospital records, 1992 onward)
  • Canadian Cancer Registry
  • Canadian Community Health Survey (all cycles)
  • Canadian Health Measures Survey (all cycles).

Output: No information from the DRD will be released outside of Statistics Canada. The DRD and Key Registry will be used exclusively to support the development of research files within the SDLE. Statistics Canada will retain the DRD and Key Registry files until it is determined that there is no further need for them.

Research projects will be approved on a study-by-study basis. These may be carried out as part of a research agenda initiated by Statistics Canada or in response to client requests. A summary of each approved study will be posted on the Statistics Canada website.

Linkage of the 2013 General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27, Social Identity, and the Longitudinal Immigrant Database (090-2014)

Purpose: A record linkage between the 2013 General Social Survey (GSS) on Social Identity and the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) Longitudinal Immigrant Database (IMDB) would permit analysis of social outcomes (such as civic participation) of immigrants to Canada by entrance characteristics, such as admission category (e.g., refugee and family class). The results from this record linkage would be used by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to support and evaluate immigrant policies and programs.

Description: The General Social Survey (GSS) on Social Identity provides detailed information on the social and civic integration of immigrants and ethno-cultural minorities into Canadian society. The Longitudinal Immigrant Database (IMDB) provides information on immigrants to Canada from 1980 to 2012, such as admission category and low-income measures. The record linkage between the Landing File and the 2013 General Social Survey employed a hierarchical deterministic record linkage program developed by Household Survey Methods Division for the IMDB.

Only GSS respondents will be maintained for this record linkage.

Output: Only non-confidential aggregate statistical estimates that conform to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada. Outputs for the Longitudinal Immigrant Database (IMDB) and the General Social Survey (GSS) on Social Identity linkage will include a collection of cross-tabulations between these two sources.

The linkage results, including variables used to perform the record linkage, such as personal identifiers and information used to measure the linkage quality, will be destroyed by March 31, 2016 (or sooner if no longer required). All files will be kept on a server in a secure area. Access to these files is restricted to Statistics Canada employees and deemed employees of Statistics Canada whose assigned work activities require such access.

Linkage of records from the 2011 survey for the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) (002-2015)

Purpose: Given that the linguistic practices of official language minorities in the labour market and their communities affect their cultural and economic vitality, linking PIAAC data with 2011 NHS and 2011 Census data will provide information on each member of a PIAAC respondent's household, which cannot be done at this time. This will help us gain a better understanding of the relationship between the characteristics of household members and the level of skills measured in the PIAAC. As well, the census and NHS include questions that were not asked in the PIAAC survey (e.g., questions to derive the first official language spoken and a question on languages used regularly at work), hence the importance of linking data from different sources.

Description: The PIAAC survey is part of a series of international surveys that have been conducted since the mid-1980s to measure the various dimensions of adult literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills. The 2011 Census and 2011 NHS contain information on respondents' first official language spoken and on the members of the respondents' household.

Records from the PIAAC, 2011 Census and 2011 NHS are linked using a deterministic hierarchical record linkage program.

Only PIAAC survey respondents and members of their households will be retained for this record linkage.

Output: Only estimates that present aggregate data in accordance with the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be published outside Statistics Canada. Products derived from the linkage between PIAAC, the census and the NHS will be in the form of cross-tabulations, charts, geographical maps and results of multivariate logistic and linear regressions.

The results of the linkage, including the variables used to link the records, such as personal identifiers and information for measuring linkage quality, will be destroyed by March 31, 2016, at the latest, or as soon as they are no longer required. All files will be stored on a server in a secure location. Access to the linkage results is restricted to Statistics Canada employees and deemed employees of Statistics Canada whose work assignment requires this access.

(011-2015) Prostate Cancer Surveillance and Occupational Exposures: A Subsequent Use of Linkage 049-2012

Purpose: Utilizing a large and accessible population dataset like the 1991 Census cohort will provide evidence on multiple occupational exposures and prostate cancer to further research in identifying risk factors for prostate cancer. There is a need to explore occupational exposures and prostate cancer at a national level with available occupational information. This large dataset will provide more knowledge and understanding, while contributing to the insufficient evidence in the literature. This is an important area of research, as prostate cancer incidence is increasing and as there continues to be little known about the etiology of this cancer. Is there a relationship between occupational exposures and prostate cancer in Canadian workers, is the research question. The objectives are to test relevant hypotheses related to occupational exposures in the etiology of prostate cancer and to evaluate if specific industry and occupational exposures are related to prostate cancer in Canadian workers.

Description: The 1991 Canadian Census of Population, Canadian Mortality and Cancer Follow-up study is a probabilistic linked database. Approximately 2.7 million individuals aged 25 or older, who were enumerated by the 1991 long-form census, were followed for mortality, cancer and annual place of residence.

Output: Only aggregate data and analyses conforming to the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act will be released outside of Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, in the form of peer-reviewed journal articles, presentations at conferences and a part of a graduate-level thesis/dissertation.

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