Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Program 1: Economic and Environmental Statistics

Description

Program highlights

This program produces monthly and annual measures of the gross domestic product, the Consumer Price Index, indicators of retail and wholesale trade, Canada's merchandise export and import statistics, estimates of agricultural income and expenditures, transportation statistics, and statistics relevant to the analysis of relationships between human activity and the environment.

Through the Economic and Environmental Statistics program, Statistics Canada creates a trusted, relevant and comprehensive source of information on the entire spectrum of Canada's economy to inform public debate on economic issues; support economic policy development, implementation and evaluation; and guide business decision making. These statistics support various agreements and statutory requirements specified by legislation or regulations in such areas as taxation.

Planning highlights

The Economic and Environmental Statistics program will not only continue to publish and disseminate its core set of economic and environmental statistics, but it will also expand significantly in 2017–18 to support several of the government's key priorities. These include growing the middle class; climate change; economic growth through innovation; the increase and diversification of trade and foreign investment; better social and economic security for Canadians; and modern, sustainable and resilient infrastructure. 

Information on the disparities among households by income quintile, age, household type and other factors can help us understand the economy. While household surveys have yielded this type of information in the past, measurements used in household surveys differ from those in economic surveys and made it difficult to align these data with macroeconomic statistics.

In 2016, Statistics Canada released timely estimates of wealth distribution across Canadian households. The information was released within an integrated framework that conforms to international standards, and it therefore provided a more complete view of the risks associated with rising inequality and the implications for financial stability in Canada.

In 2017–18, the agency will expand this wealth dataset to include a longer time series, as well as information on income distribution and consumption across Canadian households. These data will support the government's priority to better understand and grow the middle class. In addition, the agency will develop a provisional seniors' price index and an options analysis regarding the construction of such an index. The index will serve to better track the changes in prices that affect seniors.

Changes in technology, trade agreements, multinational organizational structures and government policy have significantly altered the way businesses operate. Today, many businesses operate on a global rather than domestic scale. The agency must adapt its data on national income and trade to better capture the increasingly global activities and connectedness of businesses, governments and individuals.

Statistics Canada has developed and produces a rich set of data to track Canada's transactions with the rest of the world. These data have served well over the years but risk losing their relevance in the context of today's highly interconnected world. It is no longer enough to report the cross-border flow of goods and services, or the type, origin and destination of these goods and services. Policy makers need to know more about importers and exporters, Canada's value added in the global value chain, Canada's exposure to global financial markets, and the impact of foreign direct investment—both in Canada and abroad.

Over the last three years, Statistics Canada developed a number of innovative statistical products to provide a new perspective on Canada in the global economy. These products also support the government's priority of increasing and diversifying trade and foreign investment.

Clean growth

Statistics Canada's environment statistics program is expanding to cover the production and use of clean technologies, which are considered an important component of green growth.

With this priority in mind, Statistics Canada partnered with Global Affairs Canada to develop and produce detailed statistics to support trade negotiations with the United States on softwood lumber. The project included accelerating the dissemination schedule to ensure the timely release of these statistics. In addition, the agency is enhancing its statistics on manufacturing and logging, and providing technical assistance on manufacturing and trade data to Global Affairs Canada.

The agency is developing a statistical framework to provide information regularly on the clean technology sector's economic contributions to the Canadian economy. This framework will help the government track progress toward its clean technology objectives and support the Innovation Agenda. It will include a natural resources satellite account, a clean technology satellite account and an updated Survey of Environmental Goods and Services.

Statistics Canada's Economic and Environmental Statistics program produces comprehensive information that supports economic policy development, guides business decision making and informs the public about the economy. The program continues to take steps to manage and reduce response burden for small and medium-sized businesses. In addition, the program is increasing its use of online survey questionnaires and improving overall relevance.

Statistics Canada has a number of mechanisms to remain relevant and respond to the evolving needs of users, including:

  • frequent consultations with data users to understand their evolving needs,
  • a rigorous program of audits and evaluations to adjust and improve programs, and
  • an annual agency-wide planning session to prioritize activities.

With these mechanisms, the agency's programs can learn from past experience and adapt as needed. ‎In addition, the agency has a comprehensive monitoring system to ensure that it continues to evolve and remain relevant.

In 2015–16, Statistics Canada's Audit and Evaluation Branch completed an audit of the Canadian Centre for Data Development and Economic Research. The audit report presented findings and recommendations that have been incorporated into the Economic and Environmental Statistics Program's planned activities. These include, for example, improving documentation and reviewing the structure of the centre to reflect increased demand and use.

All risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report are applicable to this program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Canadians and public and private sector organizations use economic and environmental statistics for monitoring the economy, for policy development and for research Number of analytical and data products accessedFootnote ** 4 million website access March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Canadians and public and private sector organizations are informed about economic and environmental statistics for monitoring the economy, for policy development and for research Percentage of statistical programs with up-to-date metadata in the Integrated Metadatabase 100% of all statistical programs have a rating of "fully compliant" for all metadata elements specified in the Directive on Documenting Statistical Metadata except for accuracy tables, and variables and their related statistical classifications or lists.Footnote *** March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Minor Deficiencies
160 (75%) surveys fully compliant and 53 (25%) had minor deficiencies
Percentage of Technical reference guides up-to-date 100% of the mandatory technical reference guides are fully compliant and 100% of a newly identified technical reference guides have a roadmap March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * 100% Fully Compliant
Response rate to surveys 85% March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Percentage of key estimates meeting expected accuracy 90% March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
129,398,587 129,398,587 129,318,027 129,336,901
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
1,376 1,373 1,372

Planned spending in each year includes funding for the enhancing Canada's financial and wealth statistics for improved financial system surveillance and economic policy development, for which the funding becomes permanent in 2021–22. This increase in funding is offset by temporary allocations from the Statistical Infrastructure Program for short term projects and cyclical surveys.

Program 2: Socio-economic Statistics

Description

Program highlights

This program produces statistics on employment and the labour market, how graduates fare in the labour market, the health of Canadians, the integration of immigrants into Canadian society and the various pathways taken through the justice system.

Through the Socio-economic Statistics program, Statistics Canada provides integrated information and relevant analysis on the social and socio-economic characteristics of individuals, families and households, as well as on the major factors that affect their well-being. This information is used to inform public debate on socio-economic issues; to support social policy development, implementation and evaluation; and to guide public and private decision making. These statistics support requirements specified by legislation or regulations in such areas as labour, immigration, official languages and employment equity.

Planning highlights

To provide information with respect to areas of interest to a range of data users including government, the Socio-economic Statistics program will develop a roadmap for the delivery of its social statistics programs in the coming years.

One of the government's main priorities is improving the situation and living conditions of Indigenous peoples. Statistics Canada will collect new information about First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit in the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. The survey will focus on the participation of Indigenous peoples in the economy and collect information on their health, language, income, housing and mobility conditions. This information will provide valuable insight into the situation of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit in Canada and inform the policies and programs of many organizations, including federal, provincial and territorial governments, and Indigenous governments and organizations.

Statistics Canada will collect additional information on the labour market situation of Inuit living in Nunavut. This information will inform the federal government's obligations for the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement. In addition to these initiatives, in October 2017, the agency will release 2016 Census data on the situation and living conditions of Indigenous peoples.

Statistics Canada collects information on the social inclusion and outcomes of immigrants through its integrated statistical program on immigration. In 2017–18, the program will add new and updated information on the economic outcomes of immigrants to the Longitudinal Immigration Database, a project funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. This integrated data source offers a long-term view of the economic integration of immigrants by specific admission category, such as refugee, skilled worker and family class. With this information, analysts can examine the pathways that immigrants take from non-permanent to permanent resident status.

Another important development is the addition of the immigrant admission category to the 2016 Census database. Data from the 2016 Census on the situation of immigrants will be released in October 2017.

Statistics Canada is enhancing its information on postsecondary education by bringing together data on university, college and apprenticeship programs across the country. This will allow analysts to better understand the pathways postsecondary students take through the education system. This will also provide information on the transition of these students into the labour market, their employment and their income over time. These data will show students how others in their programs have fared in the labour market and which jurisdictions offer good opportunities. Governments and businesses will also have more information on the socio-demographic characteristics of graduates, expected skills by field of study, factors affecting program completion and where students settle after graduation.

The Re-contact with the Justice System project will provide data on why some individuals have no contact or only limited contact with the justice system while others have repeat involvement. The initial project was undertaken with the province of Saskatchewan and will be extended to other jurisdictions in 2017–18. Statistics Canada will expand the scope to include data from other social domains, such as education, the labour market, social services and health. This will provide an enhanced overview of the justice system, as well as information on people who have repeated contacts with justice, health, education and community services.

Physical and mental health of children and youth

Statistics Canada's Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth is in its pilot phase and will collect information on a range of factors likely to affect the physical and mental health of children and youth, including physical and sedentary activity, the use of electronic devices, nutrition, and time spent in school.

Currently, there is a lack of health data about children under the age of 12. To fill this important gap, Statistics Canada, in collaboration with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, developed the Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth. This survey will gather information on a range of factors likely to affect the physical and mental health of children and youth. A pilot version of the survey was conducted in 2016, and selected national-level results will be released in 2017. The full survey will be run every three years, starting in 2018–19.

As noted previously, the agency makes use of a number of mechanisms to remain relevant and respond to the evolving needs of users, including a program of audits and evaluations to adjust and improve programs. For example, an audit of the Justice Statistics Program indicated the need for more formal documentation of processes. EvaluationsFootnote 1 have pointed out a need for strengthening and formalizing governance models with stakeholders and partners to ensure ongoing relevance. Audit and evaluation findings will be incorporated into the plans for the program going forward.

All risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report are applicable to this program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Canadians and public and private sector organizations use socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research. Number of analytical and data products accessedFootnote ** 8 million website access March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Canadians and public and private sector organizations are informed about socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research. Percentage of statistical programs with up-to-date metadata in the Integrated Metadatabase 100% of all statistical programs have a rating of "fully compliant" for all metadata elements specified in the Directive on Documenting Statistical Metadata except for accuracy tables, and variables and their related statistical classifications or lists.Footnote *** March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Minor Deficiencies
50 (78%) deemed fully compliant and 14 (22%) had minor deficiencies
Canadians and public and private sector organizations are informed about socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research. Percentage of Technical reference guides up-to-date 100% of the mandatory technical reference guides are fully compliant and 100% of a newly identified technical reference guides have a roadmap March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * 100% Fully Compliant
Canadians and public and private sector organizations are informed about socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research. Response rate to surveys 70% March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Canadians and public and private sector organizations are informed about socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research. Percentage of key estimates meeting expected accuracy 90% March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
99,153,760 99,153,760 98,621,712 101,281,556
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
1,096 1,090 1,112

The decrease in planned spending and FTEs from 2017–18 to 2018–19 mainly represents ending of temporary allocations from Statistical Infrastructure Program. The increase in planned spending and FTEs from 2018–19 to 2019–20 mainly represents an increase in funding related to the profile of the Survey of Financial Security which provides a comprehensive picture of the net worth of Canadians.

Program 3: Censuses

Description

Through the Census programs, Statistics Canada provides information on changes in the Canadian population, in demographic characteristics, and in the agricultural sector. This information serves as a basis for public and private decision making, and research and analysis in areas of concern to Canadians. The program includes the Census of Population and the Census of Agriculture. Both the Census of Population and the Census of Agriculture are mandated by the Statistics Act; the Census of Population is also mandated in the Constitution Act.

Planning highlights

Census of Population

The census is a critical and unique source of data at low levels of geography and for small populations. Because it is conducted every five years, it is possible to compare results to see what changes to Canada's population and society have occurred over time.

The federal government's decision to reinstate the long-form census was followed by a historic 98.4% level of participation in the Census of Population, higher than the previous two censuses. Canadians' response to the 2016 long form was the best ever recorded, at 97.8%. As a result, Statistics Canada will provide high-quality information on virtually all communities across Canada, helping to inform evidence-based decision making for all levels of government, businesses and other organizations. Census information is used in planning services such as schools, public transportation, senior housing, and police and fire services.

Census of Population counts are critical in producing demographic estimates after each census. Every year, the federal government uses these estimates to distribute millions of dollars in federal transfers to provinces and territories. Key components of these distributions are health and social transfers, territorial formula financing, and equalization payments. In addition, the rebased demographic estimates are used to determine the number of electoral districts, as per the Fair Representation Act.

Beginning in February 2017, Statistics Canada will release results from the 2016 Census of Population short and long forms, as well as the 2016 Census of Agriculture.

An accelerated release schedule is planned to provide Canadians with results in a more timely fashion than for any previous Census of Population. The first results will be published on February 8, 2017, with the release of data on population and dwelling counts. All major data releases will be completed by the end of 2017.

Census of Agriculture

To reduce respondent burden, Statistics Canada offers farmers flexibility in how and when they respond to the Census of Agriculture. For the 2016 Census of Agriculture, 55% of responses from farm operators were received through an electronic questionnaire, five times the rate recorded for the 2011 collection.

The first release of results from the 2016 Census of Agriculture is planned for May 10, 2017. The Census of Agriculture is the only tool that can provide farmers, their associations and governments with financial and production information at a very fine level of geographical detail. Responding to the needs of these users, and thanks to the participation of Canadian farm operators, Statistics Canada will be able to publish high-quality data that will include, for the first time, information on technology use, direct marketing practices, succession planning, farm practices and land features, along with renewable-energy-producing systems.

These statistics will be used by policy makers to develop stronger agricultural policies that provide better support for farmers and promote the competitiveness of the Canadian agricultural industry.

Given the significant scope of the census, Statistics Canada begins planning well in advance of collection. Efforts are now underway for the 2021 Census. Before each census, Statistics Canada conducts an extensive user consultation and testing program. Data users and interested parties across Canada are asked for their views on the type and extent of information that they believe should be available from the census. The goal is to ensure that Statistics Canada takes account of emerging social and economic trends and, where appropriate, uses the census to shed light on them. Consultations with Canadians on content for 2021 will take place in 2017–18.

In addition, the agency will further refine collection processes to ensure that the 2021 Census Program continues to improve inclusiveness, data quality and efficiency. Statistics Canada, in collaboration with its federal partners, will continue to explore ways to increase the use of administrative data to further reduce respondent burden and costs.

In terms of lessons learned for the Census Program, the agency's Audit and Evaluation Branch evaluated both the Census of Population and Census of Agriculture programs in 2015–16. For example, one of the recommendations of the Census of Population evaluation indicated a need to ensure the more timely release of information. For the 2016 Census of Population, the program will disseminate all major releases for the cycle within 18 months of Census Day, an improvement of 10 months compared with the 2011 cycle. Both census programs integrated the findings and recommendations of the evaluation reports into their planning activities.

All risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report are applicable to this program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Canadians and Government policy makers use Census of Population and Census of Agriculture data to make informed decisions. Number of analytical and data products accessed for the Census of PopulationFootnote ** 22.5 million website access March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Canadians and Government policy makers use Census of Population and Census of Agriculture data to make informed decisions. Number of analytical and data products accessed for the Census of Agriculture 500,000 March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Canadians and Government policy makers are informed about Census of Population and Census of Agriculture programs to make informed decisions. Percentage of statistical programs with up-to-date metadata in the Integrated Metadatabase 100% of all statistical programs have a rating of "fully compliant" for all metadata elements specified in the Directive on Documenting Statistical Metadata except for accuracy tables, and variables and their related statistical classifications or lists.Footnote *** March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Minor deficiencies
4 (67%) were fully compliant and 2 (33%) had minor deficiencies
Canadians and Government policy makers are informed about Census of Population and Census of Agriculture programs to make informed decisions. Percentage of Technical reference guides up-to-date 100% of the mandatory technical reference guides are fully compliant and 100% of a newly identified technical reference guides have a roadmap March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * 100% Fully Compliant
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
52,610,877 52,610,877 15,534,420 8,306,574
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
497 136 55

Spending fluctuations between years are caused by the cyclical nature of the 2016 Census Program, for which activity peaked in 2016-17. The Census Program is now winding down and focusing on completing processing of returns, continue data quality studies, disseminate results, and to complete evaluations of the 2016 Census of Population and Agriculture. Funding for the 2021 Census of Population and the 2021 Census of Agriculture has not yet been approved which amplifies the decrease in the overall Census Program funding.

Program 4: Statistical Infrastructure

Description

Through the Statistical Infrastructure program, Statistics Canada administers activities and services that support a strong statistical system. These activities and services include development of sound statistical methodology, standardized concepts and classifications, development and provision of information about the agency's surveys and statistical programs; and the development and maintenance of registers of enterprises and addresses for statistical purposes. The activities and services also include data-collection for Statistics Canada's surveys, the production of Statistics Canada's catalogued publications, online databases; and dissemination through Statistics Canada's official release vehicle. As well as the co-ordination of those aspects of the agency's Integrated Strategic Planning Process, which ensures the continuity and quality maintenance of programs.

Planning highlights

Statistics Canada will make data more accessible to Canadians. The agency will modernize its dissemination model by better organizing its data holdings, simplifying its product line, simplifying discovery and navigation, and introducing a common output database for aggregate statistics. The Statistical Infrastructure program will also research methods to disseminate more detailed information to Canadians, while protecting data confidentiality.

Statistics Canada has a strong presence in the international statistical community. The agency works with international organizations and expert groups to gain and share knowledge and insight. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable DevelopmentFootnote 2 requires strong statistical underpinnings to ensure good governance and accountable institutions. As a member of the Inter-agency Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators, Statistics Canada will contribute to developing a robust global indicator framework. This work directly supports the Government of Canada's Innovation Agenda and its objectives to have an inclusive and fair Canada, a clean economy, and an open and transparent government.

The Statistical Infrastructure program will provide employees with in-depth training on survey skills and best practices; business, economic and social statistics; and data interpretation and analysis. The program will work closely with other government partners, particularly the Canada School of Public Service and the Privy Council Office, to extend this training to other government employees.

In the next three years, the Statistical Infrastructure program will modernize its statistical registers and increase its use of modern geographical approaches and methods to map and present data. It will also explore the possibility of adding information on buildings and people to its statistical registers. These registers currently consist of lists of enterprises and addresses.

Crowdsourcing initiative

Statistics Canada initiated a pilot project aimed at examining the potential of crowdsourcing for statistical purposes. The pilot will map buildings and their attributes in the Ottawa–Gatineau region, inviting Canadians to update the physical characteristics of buildings on electronic maps using open-source technologies. So far, this experiment has been met with great enthusiasm.

The program plans to draw on lessons from the successful 2016 Census to make improvements to its ongoing surveys. Part of this plan is to migrate all of the approximately 350 surveys to the same flexible survey operating system used for the Census Program. This will replace outdated technology and integrate the management of surveys in Statistics Canada's call centres and home-based interviewer workforce. These initiatives will reduce operating costs and allow surveys to be developed in a timelier manner and offered online by 2021.

The program will research innovative ways to conduct surveys, respond to new data needs and reduce response burden. These new approaches are essential to address the decline in response rates and to maintain data accuracy. For instance, the program is looking at different ways to contact respondents, including through social media and semi-customized materials.

The program will expand its use of alternative data sources to replace, complement or supplement surveys. This initiative includes using data collected by the government or private sector, satellite imagery or the Internet. Statistics Canada will continue to enhance its processes to meet current and emerging data needs.

Open data portal

Improvements to the portal include new data visualization capabilities for open maps, open data, open information and proactive disclosure.

As the service provider for the Government of Canada's Open Government portal, Statistics Canada is increasing the public's access to government information by making its own data available on the portal and by making the portal easier for Canadians to use.

In 2017–18, Statistics Canada will continue to maintain and enhance the federal Open Government portal in collaboration with the Treasury Board Secretariat so as to allow for more data and information to be made freely available to Canadians. In addition, the agency will publish forthcoming results from the 2016 Census of Population and the 2016 Census of Agriculture on the portal.

In 2017–18, the agency will pilot a project to create the Centre of Expertise on Open Government Statistics. The centre will provide a publishing platform for all federal government statistics and will allow departments to benefit from Statistics Canada's expertise in data quality and confidentiality.

The Statistical Infrastructure Program will continue to adapt to evolving technological and methodological needs. For example, the agency is exploring a prototype system for small area estimation to produce estimates for small geographic areas by combining survey estimates and administrative data using data models. Over the past years, in-depth evaluations were undertaken using the prototype and a number of large-scale surveys. As a result, the system has been used as part of the household wealth distribution tables, and further integration into the agency's programs is being examined.

All risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report are applicable to this program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results  2015–16 Actual results
An infrastructure of statistical services and activities is administered to support an effective statistical system Percentage of programs directly supported by methodology services 100% March 2018 80% 100% 100%
An infrastructure of statistical services and activities is administered to support an effective statistical system Percentage of programs using statistical infrastructure services 100% March 2018 100% 100% 100%
An infrastructure of statistical services and activities is administered to support an effective statistical system Percentage of programs using operational statistical services 100% March 2018 81% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
120,393,991 120,393,991 93,066,264 86,758,045
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
888 873 865

The decrease in planned spending and FTEs from 2017–18 is mainly related to the funding profile of an out-of-court settlement. The settlement is related to pay equity for employees of Statistical Survey Operations (SSO) for the period covering 1985 to 2013. The settlement will see retroactive wage adjustment payments made to current and former employees of SSO, which will take place during 2017–18 and 2018–19.

Program 5: Cost-recovered Statistical Services

Description

Through the Cost-recovered Statistical Services program, Statistics Canada produces on-demand, high-quality, cost-recovered statistical services that meet specific needs of federal, provincial and territorial institutions and other clients that are not met by the core statistical program.

Planning highlights

The Cost-recovered Statistical Services program ensures that Statistics Canada remains relevant and responsive to the emerging needs of policy makers and others by providing services to clients, including other federal government departments and agencies, on a cost-recovery basis. In 2017–18, this program will support government priorities, including a clean growth economy and growth for the middle class.

Custom surveys

Custom surveys include surveys on cybersecurity, core public infrastructure, regulatory compliance, clean energy and public transit, job vacancies and wages, and Canadians with disabilities.

Cost-recovery activities include custom surveys and non-survey projects that will produce new statistical information and analysis. Outputs, such as microdata linkages and the integration of various data sources, will close data gaps, support the work priorities of policy departments and help measure program outcomes. 

Research based on accurate and reliable information supports innovation and open government. It also contributes to the development of evidence-based policies that foster the well-being of Canadians and a healthy Canadian economy. Therefore, the agency is committed to ensuring that academics and policy researchers can use Statistics Canada data to their fullest potential.

Statistics Canada's microdata access programs have proven to be effective in promoting social science, health and economic research on Canadian themes using Canadian data sources. As a result, starting in 2017–18, these programs will increase the number and types of data files available for research through the Data Liberation Initiative, real-time remote access, the Canadian Centre for Data Development and Economic Research, research data centres and the Federal Research Data Centre. Real-time remote access will be enhanced to perform better and be easier to use. The agency offers a range of access to data files, while protecting confidentiality and safeguarding privacy.

Global Affairs Canada is sponsoring Statistics Canada to provide international technical assistance to the Caribbean region and Senegal. In the Caribbean, the agency is working with 14 countries to enhance the regional systems of national accounts, to develop an infrastructure for business and household surveys, and to improve data dissemination and the sharing of expertise.

In Senegal, Statistics Canada will conduct a series of statistical technical assistance and capacity-building missions to improve statistical governance; produce and communicate key, high-quality socio-economic indicators; and promote the use of statistics through inclusive, results-based policy. In addition, the agency will continue to contribute to the Partnership in Statistics for Development in the 21st CenturyFootnote 3, which promotes the implementation of statistical legislation and internationally recognized best practices in data collection and analysis.

In 2017, Statistics Canada will conduct the triennial Public Service Employee Survey on behalf of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. The 2017 survey will cover the opinions of employees on engagement, the workplace, the workforce and leadership, and will provide new information on employee mental health.

As part of its core activities, the Cost-recovered Statistical Services Program produces statistical services to meet the specific needs of clients. In the coming year, it will continue to customize survey and analytical studies, as well as to produce custom data requests for clients, ensuring that it remains relevant and responsive to their information needs. The program will also integrate lessons learned into its planning activities.

All risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report are applicable to this program.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Government policy makers, institutions and private sector clients use Statistics Canada's cost recovery services. Value of cost-recovery contracts conducted by Statistics Canada - Statistical Surveys and Related Services $102,891,203 March 2018 $74,066,406 $71,790,433 $89,956,980
Government policy makers, institutions and private sector clients use Statistics Canada's cost recovery services. Value of cost-recovery contracts conducted by Statistics Canada - Custom Requests and Workshops $3,928,570 March 2018 $5,015,619 $5,074,983 $4,385,410
Government, universities, other institutions and private sector clients have access to the appropriate service providing access to microdata files that meets their needs. Number of post-secondary institutions, governmental and other organizations receiving access to microdata files 110 March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Government, institutions and private sector clients have access to available, microdata files subject to confidentiality and privacy controls, as well as public use microdata files to meet their information needs as requested through the Research Data Centres, the Federal Research Data Centre, Real-Time Remote Access, the Data Liberation Initiative and the Access to PUMFs collection. Number of cycles of microdata files and public use microdata files available to Canadian post-secondary institutions, research data centres and other institutions. 2,050 March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Government policy makers, institutions and private sector clients use the services for data capture and imaging, coding and access to Statistics Canada's microdata files, customized to meet their needs. Percentage of Collection Operation Service Agreements (COSA) components that are met (cost recovery) 90% March 2018 Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote * Not availableFootnote *
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
124,585,384 124,585,384 124,585,384 124,585,384
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
1,010 1,010 1,010

The agency's statistical program is funded from two sources: direct parliamentary appropriations and cost-recovery activities. Statistics Canada plans to generate approximately $124 million in funding over the next three years (including both respendable revenue, approximately $112 million, and statutory funding approximately $12.5 million).

Information on Statistics Canada's lower-level programs is available on Statistics Canada's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

One of Statistics Canada's main priorities is to make internal services as efficient as possible to ensure that a larger share of available resources is used by statistical programs. While the agency is highly cost effective in its delivery of internal services, it has developed a number of strategies to continue increasing efficiencies, including modernizing the information technology infrastructure and adopting common tools and processes for these services.

Statistics Canada will continue to leverage technology to increase the efficiency of internal services processes based on the success of past initiatives. For example, in 2015–16, the agency launched an electronic workflow tool and by 2016–17, all eligible forms were migrated to the new tool, eliminating 97% of all paper-based processes.

One of the government's priorities is to develop a set of common tools to deliver core internal services. To align with this priority, in 2017–18, Statistics Canada will begin to implement GCDOCS in phases. GCDOCS is a new electronic document and records management system that will allow the agency to keep records and manage electronic information in a way that is consistent with the rest of the public service. The agency will continue to work closely with the Treasury Board Secretariat to develop plans for implementing common financial and human resources management tools and processes in the coming years.

Statistics Canada is working in close collaboration with Shared Services Canada on a plan to migrate the agency's data holdings to a modern, state-of-the-art enterprise data centre. Integral to this plan are the further strengthening of overall security and the protection of critical informatics technology from cyber threats.

Statistics Canada is committed to providing a safe, healthy and inclusive work environment to foster further collaboration, experimentation and work–life balance. Aligned with Blueprint 2020 objectives, the agency will adopt new technologies in 2017–18 and plan for a modern, flexible and mobile workforce that reflects the labour market expectations of today and the future.

The Census made use of proactive social marketing practices to encourage all Canadians to self-enumerate. The strategy leveraged a multi-mode approach and deployed behavioural economics to target populations that have proven more difficult to enumerate in the past. This approach helped to make this the most efficient census ever conducted in Canada or abroad. Almost 9 in 10 households completed the census without assistance from Statistics Canada staff. The significant success with this endeavour will inform the agency's communications strategies going forward.

Only the first of the risks noted in the "Key risks" section of this report is applicable to this program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending
64,907,612 64,907,612 64,594,631 64,754,098
Human resources (full-time equivalents or FTEs)
2017–18 Planned FTEs 2018–19 Planned FTEs 2019–20 Planned FTEs
591 587 589

The changes in planned spending and FTEs from 2017–18 to subsequent years mainly represent changes in temporary allocations from the Statistical Infrastructure program.

Date modified: