Archived – Program 2: Socio-economic Statistics

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Program description

The Socio-Economic Statistics Program’s purpose is to provide integrated information and relevant analysis on the social and socio-economic characteristics of individuals, families and households and on the major factors that affect their well-being. This information is used to inform public debate on socio-economic issues; support social policy development, implementation and evaluation; guide public and private decision making and is the primary source for assessing the impact of changing economic circumstances on Canadians. The information is used extensively to evaluate and cost economic and social policy options and alternatives by federal departments such as Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Footnote 1, Industry Canada, Justice Canada, Public Safety Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canadian Heritage, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Transport Canada and Infrastructure Canada, as well as provincial governments. The Socio-economic Statistics program supports statistical requirements specified by legislation or regulations in the areas of labour, immigration and employment equity. The program also provides information, analysis and measures on publicly-funded facilities, agencies and systems designed to meet the socio-economic and physical needs of Canadians, on the characteristics of the individual Canadians and families they serve, and on the outcomes of the services they provide, such as justice, health, and education.

Table 1 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) — Socio-economic Statistics
2013/2014 Main Estimates 2013/2014 Planned Spending 2013/2014 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013/2014 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
95,775,203 95,775,203 101,347,898 103,547,956 7,772,753
Table 2 Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs]) — Socio-economic Statistics
2013/2014 Planned 2013/2014 Actual 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
649 695 46
  • The difference between planned and actual spending for this program is mainly the result of additional funding received during the year to compensate equivalent salary expenditures to meet the employer’s legal obligations, for example, parental leave. This program’s spending is in line with the funding it has available for use, with a minimal variance of 2.2%, reflecting an approved temporary spending toward updating the program.
Table 3 Performance Indicators — Socio-economic Statistics
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Public and private sector organizations utilize socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations, and others) using the data regularly 100 100
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations, and others) satisfied with the data 80 Unavailable for 2013/2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned — Socio-economic Statistics

Socio-economic statistics are utilized by public and private sector organizations for policy development and for research.

2013/2014 activities

  • Statistics Canada continued to deliver timely and accurate socio-economic statistics. For details, please see Organizational Priorities in Section 1 of this document.
  • Increased support of key policy needs and initiatives. For details, please see Organizational Priorities in Section I of this document.
  • Online data reporting for household surveys: Interest is growing in the Internet as a survey response option, as shown through Statistics Canada’s experience with the 2006 and 2011 Censuses of Population—54% of respondents completed their census form online in 2011. In 2013/2014, the program offered an online response option to General Social Survey respondents for the 2013 Social Identity Survey; continued integrating the online response option for the General Social Survey (GSS) cycles; analyzed the online results, including the online pilot test for the Labour Force Survey (LFS), as well as some supplementary surveys attached to the LFS infrastructure, such as the Travel Survey of Residents of Canada; integrated the online response option into the LFS collection operation to facilitate an Internet response option in the near future; using lessons learned from the GSS and the LFS, developed Internet response options for other household surveys, such as the new Cross-sectional Income Survey.
  • Expand administrative data use for statistical purposes: Statistics Canada assessed the Longitudinal Health and Administrative Database initiative and, as a result, launched a proof-of-concept project to develop a Social Domain Record Linkage Environment to facilitate cost-effective and efficient linkage across data files and social domains. The Agency also explored the potential to produce more small-area data and to develop new research venues by linking surveys and administrative sources; continued to assess the Indian Registry for statistical purposes; increased the use of Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s administrative files to better inform policies on the integration of immigrants to Canada; and continued to introduce administrative data for statistical purposes in Statistics Canada’s Research Data Centres (RDCs), with the Canadian Cancer Registry and vital statistics data that are now available via the RDC network. The use of the Longitudinal Administrative Databank, alone and with some education data, will be piloted in the federal RDC.

Sub-program 2.1: Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics

Program description

This program provides indicators that allow the measurement of the economic well-being of Canadians through information on labour market, income, expenditures and wealth, pensions, housing and education. The program also covers statistics on tourism. Indicators are produced at various frequencies. Labour market estimates, which are among the most timely and important measures of the overall performance of the Canadian economy, are reported monthly. A multi-dimensional picture of the financial well-being of Canadian families and individuals is provided through an annual survey on income, expenditures and a periodic measurement of wealth. Indicators collected through tax data complete that picture. Information on pension funds is provided quarterly, and information on pension plans is provided yearly. The program also has a comprehensive set of Pan-Canadian education statistics and analysis that is released yearly. Tourism indicators are released monthly. The program supplies data to the SNA, the Tourism Satellite Accounts and the Balance of Payments. The program collection mandate stems from requirements in the Employment Insurance Act, the Judges Act, Senate and House of Commons Acts, the Canada and Quebec Pension Plan Acts, and the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Regulations. The outputs of this program support economic, social and monetary policy and are relied on heavily by governments, financial institutions and researchers alike to monitor the impact of policies and programs. Specific user agencies include Finance Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada Footnote 2, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Industry Canada, the Canadian Tourism Commission and the Bank of Canada.

Table 4 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) — Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics
2013/2014 Planned Spending 2013/2014 Actual Spending 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
41,130,324 42,878,556 1,748,232
Table 5 Human Resources (FTEs) — Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics
2013/2014 Planned 2013/2014 Actual 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
233 279 46
  • The difference between planned and actual spending for this program is mainly the result of additional funding received during the year to compensate for equivalent salary expenditures to meet the employer’s legal obligations, for example, parental leave. Actual spending and FTEs also include temporary approved spending, until the Labour Force Survey redesign has been completed. FTEs always vary slightly due to variance between the average salary rates paid and the estimated average salary rates used in calculations at the planning stage. 
Table 6 Performance Indicators — Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government policy makers utilize labour, education, income and tourism statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100 100
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80 Unavailable for 2013/2014
Number of media citations for each mission-critical program 1,100 1,356

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned — Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics

Labour, education, income and tourism statistics are utilized by public and private sector organizations for policy development and for research.

2013/2014 activities

  • Statistics Canada continued to provide socio-economic statistics related to labour, education, income and tourism.
  • Begin the Labour Force Survey (LFS) redesign: The LFS is one of the Agency’s key activities, given the central role of its data in the management of Canada’s economy. Every ten years, following a decennial census, the LFS sample is redesigned to maintain relevance and quality. The collection and processing systems are also in scope this time. In 2013/2014, the Agency updated the sample allocation and sample design to reflect changes to population and unemployment rates. The new sample will be implemented in 2015.
  • Electronic questionnaire for the Labour Force Survey: Evaluated results from the 2012/2013 pilot project to develop an electronic questionnaire for the Labour Force Survey. The pilot was a success and work will proceed in 2014/2015 towards offering this response mode in the near future on a regular basis.
  • Statistics Canada modernized the International Travel Survey. To respond to partners’ needs, questionnaires were harmonized and reduced to two versions (from five). An electronic response option was also developed. The program used this opportunity to move to generic processing and dissemination tools.
  • Released the results of the 2012 Survey of Financial Security: For details, please see Organizational Priorities in Section 1 of this document.

Sub-program 2.2: Health and Justice Statistics

Program description

This program provides statistical information and analysis on the state of health of Canadians, and on criminal and civil justice in Canada. The program conducts the ongoing Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), and collects the data for, and maintains, Canada’s vital statistics and the Canadian Cancer Registry. Health information is used to assist and support health planners and decision-makers at all levels of government, to sustain demographic and epidemiological research, and to report to the Canadian public on their collective health and health care system. Vital statistics data are used by the population estimates program, whose results are used for the equalization program. The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, the operational arm of a federal–provincial–territorial partnership, known as the National Justice Statistics Initiative, strives to develop, implement and manage an effective national justice statistics program. The rationale for this program stems from a memorandum of understanding with Justice Canada and Cabinet decisions where Statistics Canada was named a partner in the National Justice Statistics Initiative. The program administers several surveys on crime reporting, homicide, police administration, adult and youth criminal courts, civil courts, adult corrections, expenditures personnel, and publishes key-indicator reports on adult and youth corrections. The program also administers the family violence statistical program funded by the Family Violence Initiative.

Table 7 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) — Health and Justice Statistics
2013/2014 Planned Spending 2013/2014 Actual Spending 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
38,840,037 42,723,675 3,883,638
Table 8 Human Resources (FTEs) — Health and Justice Statistics
2013/2014 Planned 2013/2014 Actual 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
286 277 -9
  • The difference between planned and actual spending for this program is mainly the result of additional funding received during the year to compensate equivalent salary expenditures to meet the employer’s legal obligations, for example, parental leave. FTEs always vary slightly due to variance between the average salary rates paid and the estimated average salary rates used in calculations at the planning stage. 
Table 9 Performance Indicators — Health and Justice Statistics
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government policy makers utilize health and justice statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100 100
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80 Unavailable for 2013/2014
Number of media citations of health and justice statistics 450 1,548

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned – Health and Justice Statistics

Health and justice statistics are utilized by government policy makers to make informed decisions.

2013/2014 activities

  • Statistics Canada continued to provide information and analysis about the state of health of Canadians and the functioning of the Canadian justice system.
  • Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) redesign: The CCHS provides information on the health status, health-care use and health determinants of the Canadian population 12 years of age and older. Health-related data are available by health region to support community-level policymaking and program development. To ensure its continued relevance and data quality, the CCHS redesign will be completed in 2015. The redesign will include reviewing the content, revising the sampling strategy, and developing an online response option. In 2013/2014, the Agency completed consultations with key stakeholders, undertook a full content review, and developed the sample allocation strategy.

Sub-program 2.3: Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics

Program description

This program produces Canada’s quarterly and annual post-censal and inter-censal population estimates and population projections that are used by all levels of government, the private sector, researchers and non-government organizations. Population estimates are used to satisfy the statutory requirements of the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Regulations, including the Canada Health and Social Transfers, the Equalization Program and the Wait Times Reduction Transfer. Territorial estimates are used in the Territorial Formula Financing. Population estimates are used to allocate federal seats to provinces under the Fair Representation Act. Population estimates must be used in connection with the following legislations: Canada Pension Plan Act, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act, Canada Student Loans Act, and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act. Data include components of population growth, namely: estimates of births, deaths, immigration, total emigration, change in non-permanent residents, and inter-provincial and intra-provincial migration. This program also produces information and analytic outputs on key social issues, including immigration, visible minorities, religion, ethnicity, language, social identity, giving and volunteering, victimization, youth, families, gender, seniors, time use, care giving and receiving, and social well-being through the General Social Survey. The information is used to support various pieces of legislation including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Citizenship Act, the Multiculturalism Act, the Official Languages Act, and the Employment Equity Act. The program provides information and subject matter expertise to help support the policy interests of Human Resources and Social Development Canada Footnote 3, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Justice Canada, Canadian Heritage, and Status of Women Canada. It is also responsible for providing subject matter expertise, coordination and integration in the collection, analysis and dissemination of data about Aboriginal people on topics such as education, use of Aboriginal languages, labour activity, income, health, communication technology, mobility and housing conditions, that are used by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Aboriginal governments and organizations.

Table 10 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) — Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics
2013/2014 Planned Spending 2013/2014 Actual Spending 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
12,029,015 14,783,882 2,754,867
Table 11 Human Resources (FTEs) — Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics
2013/2014 Planned 2013/2014 Actual 2013/2014 Difference (actual minus planned)
89 113 24
  • The difference between planned and actual spending for this program is mainly the result of additional funding received during the year to compensate equivalent salary expenditures to meet the employer’s legal obligations, for example, parental leave. Actual spending and FTEs are also higher than planned spending, as the budget was temporarily realigned to better align resources with the Agency’s priorities.
Table 12 Performance Indicators — Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government policy makers utilize demographic, Aboriginal and other social statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100 100
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80 Unavailable for 2013/2014
Number of media citations Footnote 4 250 167

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned — Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics

Demographic, Aboriginal and other social statistics are utilized by government policy makers to make informed decisions.

2013/2014 activities

  • Statistics Canada continued to provide demographic, Aboriginal and other social statistics.
  • Released the revised population estimates based on the 2011 Census of Population counts, adjusted for net undercoverage. The population estimates were rebased back to 2001.
  • Outreach to Aboriginal People: The Aboriginal Liaison Program serves as a bridge between Statistics Canada and the country’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities and organizations. The Agency increased access to Statistics Canada’s data, products and services, including improved accessibility to the 2011 Census program; and reached out to Aboriginal people and organizations on the value and use of data for their communities and populations.
  • Release the results from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey: For details, please see Organizational Priorities in Section I of this document.
  • Deliver the second phase of a corporate Generalized Tabulation Tool (G-Tab): Statistics Canada migrated travel surveys to the G-Tab system for production testing and releasing of new data tables, and developed confidentiality and statistical requirements for administrative data in G-Tab. The G-Tab project was launched to design and implement a generalized tool to support data tabulation for social data.
  • Other: Update and release of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada. Release the results from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability. Release the results from the 2012 General Social Survey on Caregiving and Care Receiving. Collect data for the General Social Survey on Social Identity, with the online response option offered for the first time.
  • Number of media citations: The target was 250; the actual result was 167. The difference may be due to the fact that these citations figures do not include news blogs and tweets, which have become new tools used by 24-hour news outlets to broadcast information. The timing of the statistical releases, which coincided with other significant news events, may also have had an impact on the extent of media coverage. As well, any media coverage related to the Census Program on demographic characteristics, language, immigration, Aboriginal and ethnocultural statistics is shown for the Census Program, and not for this sub-program.

Sub-program 2.4: Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics

Program description

This program plans, directs, coordinates and conducts a range of statistical analyses and publications. Substantive areas of analysis include population aging and its impacts on labour markets and health care needs, wait times and access to health care, the economic circumstances of immigrants, population health status, impact of diseases and health determinants, and trends in income distribution including both low income / vulnerable populations and geographic patterns including Canada’s major cities. Analysis of income and labour market data, covering topics such as data on labour force status, occupation, labour compensation, pensions, industry, individual and family income and expenditure, for both the census and sample surveys, that are of interest to policy makers, academics, business leaders and individuals is also undertaken. These activities serve four main functions and audiences: providing high quality and often leading-edge analyses on important contemporary topics for the general public; providing information of direct relevance to matters of current policy concern; contributing more generally to the corpus of national and international research in the peer-reviewed literature; and also providing an important quality assurance role to verify the accuracy and relevance of the statistics produced, to assist users in interpreting the data, and to develop relevant concepts for the production of statistics.

Table 13 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) — Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013–14 Difference (actual minus planned)
3,775,827 3,161,843 -613,984
Table 14 Human Resources (FTEs) — Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013–14 Difference (actual minus planned)
41 26 -15
  • The difference between planned and actual spending for this program is mainly due to lower hiring than planned. FTEs always vary slightly due to variance between the average salary rates paid and the estimated average salary rates used in calculations at the planning stage.
Table 15 Performance Indicators — Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Government policy makers and public and private sector researchers utilize the results of statistical analyses, models, databases and other statistical information products for informed debate, research and decision-making on socio-economic and health issues. Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the analytical products 100 Unavailable for 2013/2014
Number of professional citations Footnote 5 100 12,537

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned — Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics

The results of statistical analyses, models, databases and other statistical information products are utilized by government policy makers and public and private sector researchers for informed debate, research and decision-making on socio-economic and health issues.

2013/2014 activities

  • Statistics Canada continued to plan, direct, coordinate and produce a range of statistical analyses and publications to address topics of national concern. Development, maintenance and dissemination of several micro-simulation models also continued to serve user needs.
  • Longitudinal administrative data files: New linked files were used to examine economic trajectories and outcomes of Canadians over extended periods of their lives, providing new information on returns on education, job stability and retirement transitions.
  • Labour market phenomena: Socio-economic analysis addressed labour market phenomena associated with the expansion of Canada’s oil and gas sector, immigration levels, and selection criteria.
  • Health analysis: This included studies on the perceived need for mental health care and an age- and cause-decomposition of differences in life expectancy between residents of Inuit Nunangat and residents of the rest of Canada. A micro-simulation model was developed to estimate and project the detailed costs associated with seven neurological conditions.
  • Insights on Canadian Society: This new online publication, first released in December 2012, has continued to garner interest by providing relevant information on social issues.

Notes

Footnote 1

Now called: Employment and Social Development Canada.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Now called: Employment and Social Development Canada.

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Footnote 3

Now called: Employment and Social Development Canada.

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Footnote 4

Replaces the indicator presented in the 2013/2014 Report on Plans and Priorities: Number of media citations for each mission-critical program.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Replaces the indicator presented in the 2013/2014 Report on Plans and Priorities: Number of media citations for each mission-critical program.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

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