Archived – Program 2: Socio-economic Statistics

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Program description

The Socio-Economic Statistics Program's purpose is to provide integrated information and relevant analysis on the social and socio-economic characteristics of individuals, families and households and on the major factors that affect their well-being. This information is used to inform public debate on socio-economic issues; support social policy development, implementation and evaluation; guide public and private decision making and is the primary source for assessing the impact of changing economic circumstances on Canadians. The information is used extensively to evaluate and cost economic and social policy options and alternatives by federal departments such as Employment and Social Development Canada, Industry Canada, Justice Canada, Public Safety Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canadian Heritage, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Transport Canada and Infrastructure Canada, as well as provincial governments. The Socio-economic Statistics program supports statistical requirements specified by legislation or regulations in the areas of labour, immigration and employment equity. The program also provides information, analysis and measures on publicly-funded facilities, agencies and systems designed to meet the socio-economic and physical needs of Canadians, on the characteristics of the individual Canadians and families they serve, and on the outcomes of the services they provide, such as justice, health, and education.

Table 1 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014/2015 Main Estimates 2014/2015 Planned Spending 2015/2016 Planned Spending 2016/2017 Planned Spending
93,735,987 93,735,987 93,450,315 93,211,523
Table 2 Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017
606 603 599

The decrease in planned spending from 2014/15 is the result of program efficiencies transferred to the Statistical Infrastructure Program.

Table 3 Performance Measurement
Table summary
This table displays the results of Performance Measurement. The information is grouped by Program
Expected Results
(appearing as row headers), Performance Indicators, Targets and Date to be Achieved (appearing as column headers).
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Public- and private-sector organizations use socio-economic statistics for policy development and for research Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100% March 31, 2015
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80% March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

The Socio-economic Statistics Program offers information to decision-makers and all Canadians on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of individuals, families and households in Canada, and on the major factors that contribute to their well-being. The program measures household income and expenditure; employment, unemployment and population change; demographic characteristics; ethnocultural diversity; and general social conditions and well-being.

The program also offers information on topics of specific social policy concern. It covers the justice and education systems, as well as cultural institutions and industries (the nature and extent of their services and operations), the outcomes of the services they provide, and the characteristics of the individual Canadians and families whom they serve. It measures the health of the population, the determinants of health, and the scope and use of health-care resources. This program also provides information on the facilities, agencies and systems that are publicly funded to meet Canadians' socio-economic and physical needs, and analysis of the outcomes of the services that they provide.

Relevant, timely and accurate information on a broad range of social issues provides decision-makers in all levels of government, as well as those in non-government organizations and in academia, with essential information for developing policies, managing programs, conducting research and making decisions that affect individuals, families and households in Canada. The Socio-economic Statistics Program provides objective statistical information on topics that respond to Canada's evolving and highest-priority data needs.

Social policy and program development are supported through the statistical analysis of social and socio-economic characteristics of individuals, families and households in Canada and the major factors that can contribute to their well-being.

This includes measures of Canada's ethnocultural diversity, through the lens of first- and second-generation Canadians, as well as those whose ancestors have been in this country for three generations or more. Subgroups of the population such as recent immigrants, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and minority-language groups also contribute to Canada's ethnocultural diversity. Analyzing the socio-economic status of these groups includes measuring their household income and expenditures, their educational attainment, their employment and unemployment, their level of literacy and factors affecting the labour supply. The Survey of Financial Security is being repeated to address a need for more comprehensive data on income and wealth. Data on labour and income contribute to the System of National Accounts (SNA), including labour income, monthly gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity.

The Socio-economic Statistics Program also provides information and analysis on the facilities, agencies and systems that are publicly funded to meet Canadians' socio-economic and physical needs, and on the outcomes of the services that they provide. It covers the justice and education systems as well as cultural institutions and industries. The program measures the nature and extent of their services and operations, and the characteristics of the individual Canadians and families they serve.

An ongoing challenge to the quality of social statistics is the growing difficulty with collecting information. One significant factor is that technological advances have made it more difficult to reach respondents. Call display and call screening hinder the Agency's ability to get a respondent to answer the telephone. As well, more and more households only have cellphones or use Internet phones. All of this makes it more challenging to ensure representative samples and high response rates. Without further efforts in survey collection, the relevance and quality of data may decline.

The widespread adoption of Internet technologies also creates an opportunity to reach Canadians in new ways. To maintain quality, manage survey costs and satisfy demands for greater access to data, Statistics Canada is modernizing the infrastructure it uses to collect and disseminate data.

The planned release dates for major economic indicators can be found on the Statistics Canada website.

Planned activity: Deliver timely and accurate ongoing social statistics programs

The Socio-economic Statistics Program strives to ensure relevant, quality outputs through program renewal, which involves the activities described below. The program also delivers a broad, comprehensive set of survey and administrative data development activities.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Produce estimates of Canadians' economic well-being through the release of information on assets and debts from the Survey of Financial Security and on economic well-being through the Canadian Survey on Economic Well-being.
  • Provide statistical information and analysis about the state of Canadians' health through the Canadian Community Health Survey, the Canadian Health Measures Survey, the vital statistics program (births and deaths), as well as the Canadian Cancer Registry.
  • Provide statistical information on the Canadian education system through the release of pan-Canadian indicators. Produce information on outcomes through the availability of information from the National Graduates Survey.
  • Measure skills of Canadians through the release of data from the Program of International Assessment of Adult Competencies and the Program of International Student Assessment.
  • Following the completion of the rebasing of the population estimates to the 2011 Census of Population, the new series of estimates will be used to rebase the population totals used for the Labour Force Survey. The population estimates program will also undertake an assessment of administrative data pertaining to interprovincial migration, emigration and non-permanent residents, to improve the quality of the estimates.
  • Expand the collection of social microdata files available through the Data Liberation Initiative, the Research Data Centres (RDCs) and real-time remote access, by adding new surveys, new cycles of ongoing surveys, new administrative data sources and approved research files created by data linkages.

Planned activity: Develop information roadmaps to respond to emerging data needs in key areas of social policy

Statistics Canada is developing, reviewing and updating, in collaboration with stakeholders, information roadmaps to respond to emerging data needs in key areas of social policy, such as justice, health, the labour market, and household wealth.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Release results from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity and the 2013 General Social Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating.
  • Finish collection of data for the 2014 General Social Survey on Victimization, and begin collection of the 2015 General Social Survey on Time Use.
  • Continue to release new data, from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, on the education, employment and health of Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nations populations.
  • Continue to release results from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability, which focuses on the conditions and challenges of Canadians with disabilities.
  • Release the Canadian results from the Program of International Assessment of Adult Competencies.
  • Prepare for the release of the Program of International Student Assessment.
  • Release the first wave of results from the Longitudinal International Study of Adults.
  • Develop a program to analyze offenders' re-contact with the justice system.
  • Redesign the Integrated Correctional Services Survey to better meet stakeholder needs.

Planned activity: Make online reporting a response option for major household surveys

Canadians have shown that they appreciate the convenience and security of an Internet based e-questionnaire response option, provided that it is offered in a user-friendly way. Statistics Canada is well advanced in the development of a generalized infrastructure for Internet-based data collection. Over the next three years, this new infrastructure will continue to be deployed to make e-questionnaires the default option for business surveys and a response option for the Agency's major household surveys, including the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the General Social Survey (GSS).

Interest is growing in the Internet as a survey response option, as shown through Statistics Canada's experience with the 2006 and 2011 Censuses of Population — 54% of respondents filled out their census form online in 2011. Given this interest, and the potential savings in data-collection costs, the Internet is an option being explored for a larger proportion of household survey respondents.

The GSS was the first major household survey to introduce an online option, with the collection of the social identity topic, which will be released in 2014/2015. In January 2013, some travellers selected for the International Travel Survey were offered an online option to respond to the survey. An online option is also in development for the LFS and will be in production in 2014/2015. A high take-up rate for the LFS, and for other household surveys in the future, could produce collection efficiencies and data quality improvements in coming years.

As part of the redesign for the 2015 CCHS, an online option will be developed. A new application will available to respondents beginning in January 2017.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Continue integrating the online response option for the household surveys within the GSS program.
  • Analyze the full pilot-test results, including not only the LFS, but also some supplementary surveys attached to the LFS infrastructure, such as the Travel Survey of Residents of Canada.
  • Integrate the online response option into the LFS collection operation to offer an Internet response option in 2014.
  • Using lessons learned from the LFS, develop Internet response options for other household surveys, such as the new Cross-sectional Income Survey.
  • Begin work towards an online response option for the CCHS.

Planned activity: Expand the use of administrative data for statistical purposes

Recent technological advances have facilitated and reduced the cost of manipulating large administrative files. There is renewed interest in administrative records as an alternative to the relatively expensive collection costs of statistical surveys and censuses. Using administrative files instead of surveys should reduce respondent burden. Finally, rising demand for small-area data, which cannot usually be obtained from sample surveys, points to administrative records as a potential alternate source of such data.

Administrative data files are now being used in several social statistical programs, including provincial and territorial vital statistics registries, education, health, justice, employment insurance and federal administrative data on immigration and income tax.

Innovative work is underway on a proof of concept initiative to create a Social Domain Record Linkage Environment (SDRLE) in the social statistics field. This environment would increase the efficiency through which data linkages could be undertaken across various administrative and household survey data sets in the social domain. A SDRLE would reduce the cost and time required to conduct record linkage, facilitate the linking of data across social sectors such as health, justice and education and enhance the analytical potential of existing data sources. It would further provide a cost-effective approach for extending the utility of existing longitudinal surveys. A pilot is underway to link five discontinued longitudinal surveys to ongoing outcomes from administrative data sets, using the SDRLE.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Complete the proof of concept for a new Social Domain Record Linkage Environment and demonstrate its analytical potential.
  • Explore the potential to address emerging issues, fill data gaps, produce more small area data and develop new research opportunities by linking administrative and survey data across social domains.
  • Continue to assess the Indian Registry for statistical purposes.
  • Increase the use of Citizenship and Immigration Canada's administrative files to better inform policies on the integration of immigrants to Canada.
  • Increase the use of linkage with administrative tax data for social surveys to reduce respondent burden and increase data quality.
  • Continue to add administrative data for researchers' statistical purposes in Statistics Canada's RDCs and in the Real Time Remote Access tool. The report on the pilot of the Longitudinal Administrative Databank data in the federal RDC will be completed this year. New crime and education administrative data will be made available through Real Time Remote Access with automated and harmonized confidentiality vetting protection.

Planned activity: Redesign the General Social Survey

Work is well advanced on a comprehensive redesign of the General Social Survey (GSS) program, moving to an integrated multi-mode collection. Collection for the GSS Social Identity Survey will conclude at the end of March 2014 and, for the first time, this survey included an Internet response option. The planning and transition of each of the programs' social surveys to a multi-mode platform, along with an ongoing content review and the transition to the use of common corporate tools, will continue throughout the year.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Analyze the results of the multi-mode GSS on Social Identity.
  • Assess the impact of a new collection mode on the safety and security of respondents and on trend monitoring for the GSS on Victimization.
  • Develop, test and implement a new self-administered online time-use diary for the 2015 GSS on Time Use.
  • Develop a new policy-relevant theme for the 2016 GSS and undertake consultations with key stakeholders.
  • Continue implementation of the use of common collection, processing and dissemination tools.

Sub-program 2.1: Labour, Education, Income and Tourism Statistics

Program description

This program provides indicators that allow the measurement of the economic well-being of Canadians through information on labour market, income, expenditures and wealth, pensions, housing and education. The program also covers statistics on tourism. Indicators are produced at various frequencies.  Labour market estimates, which are among the most timely and important measures of the overall performance of the Canadian economy, are reported monthly. A multi-dimensional picture of the financial well-being of Canadian families and individuals is provided through an annual survey on income, expenditures and a periodic measurement of wealth. Indicators collected through tax data complete that picture. Information on pension funds is provided quarterly, and information on pension plans is provided yearly. The program also has a comprehensive set of Pan-Canadian education statistics and analysis that is released yearly. Tourism indicators are released monthly. The program supplies data to the SNA, the Tourism Satellite Accounts and the Balance of Payments.  The program collection mandate stems from requirements in the Employment Insurance Act, the Judges Act, Senate and House of Commons Acts, the Canada and Quebec Pension Plan Acts, and the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Regulations. The outputs of this program support economic, social and monetary policy and are relied on heavily by governments, financial institutions and researchers alike to monitor the impact of policies and programs.  Specific user agencies include Finance Canada, Employment and Social Development Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Industry Canada, the Canadian Tourism Commission and the Bank of Canada.

Table 4 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014/2015 Planned Spending 2015/2016 Planned Spending 2016/2017 Planned Spending
40,141,150 40,055,145 40,091,562
Table 5 Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017
230 228 228
Table 6 Performance Measurement
Table summary
This table displays the results of Performance Measurement. The information is grouped by Sub-program
Expected Results (appearing as row headers), Performance Indicators, Targets and Date to be Achieved (appearing as column headers).
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Government policy makers use labour, education, income and tourism statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100% March 31, 2015
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80% March 31, 2015
Number of media citations for each mission-critical program 1,100 March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

To ensure continuing relevance, the program regularly communicates with stakeholders to identify emerging information needs and to adapt existing programs to meet them. Adapting to new technologies, such as those made possible by the Internet, is also important for data collection and dissemination. The upcoming redesign of the LFS touches all of these elements.

Planned activity: Begin the Labour Force Survey redesign

Statistics Canada's monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS) is Statistics Canada's largest ongoing household survey and the LFS infrastructure supports many other social statistics programs. Designed to produce estimates of employment and unemployment at the national, provincial, census metropolitan area and economic region levels with data available within seven days of the end of the reference month, the LFS is a major factor in defining the collection infrastructure maintained by Statistics Canada. Surveys on related topics are often conducted simultaneously with the monthly survey, while the survey sample is also often reused in other statistical programs.

Every 10 years, following a decennial census, the LFS sample is redesigned to maintain its relevance and quality. A review is in progress to determine the scope of the next redesign to ensure the continued reliability of these key statistics. The LFS collection and processing systems need to be upgraded to current technologies and will be in the scope of this redesign. The LFS redesign will be conducted in two phases. First, the sample design and allocation will be modified to reflect changes in population and employment conditions. The estimates will also be rebased using the 2011 Census population estimates. This first stage of the redesign will be completed in 2014/2015, and will include introduction of an Internet response option for survey participants. The second phase will focus on updating the processing systems of the LFS by adopting common corporate business processes and systems. This phase of the redesign will be completed in 2016/2017.

The LFS is the source of widely-used statistics, such as the official unemployment rate. LFS data, the first of Statistics Canada's socio-economic statistics to be published each month, are highly relevant in determining the direction of the economy and the effect of changing economic conditions on Canadians. In particular, the Employment Insurance Act has designated the LFS as the source of monthly unemployment rates used in the administration of the Employment Insurance Program. Approximately $8 billion per year are transferred to individuals on the basis of these rates.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Revise the sample allocation and some methodological aspects for the redesign of 2014 (e.g., smart targets).
  • Rebase the population estimates based on the 2011 Census, and reproduce the various products for stakeholders (time series, public-use microdata files).
  • Offer an internet response option to respondents to the LFS, following an initial contact with them .

Planned activity: Release the results of the 2012 Survey of Financial Security

Statistics Canada has ongoing coverage of household income and expenditure data. Measuring families' wealth by collecting information on net worth, or assets minus debts, takes place less often. Wealth has been identified as an important statistical data gap to effectively discuss issues related to pension and income replacement. Several countries have implemented a wealth survey as part of their regular program.

Statistics Canada conducted the first Survey of Financial Security in 1999, which provided a comprehensive picture of Canadians' net worth. Information was collected on the value of all major financial and non-financial assets and on debt held on mortgages, vehicles, credit cards, student loans and other forms of credit.

Since these data were last collected in 2005, significant changes in the economy, investment options and strategies as well as the tax system have likely had an impact on the net worth of households. Statistics Canada has received strong representations from major policy departments and its advisory committees, including the National Statistics Council, that an update to this data is urgently required. To provide up-to-date information on the net worth of Canadian households, Statistics Canada collected information on financial security in 2012.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Release the results of the 2012 Survey of Financial Security in early 2014.
  • Continue analysis and research on the data.

Planned activity: Develop measures of labour market performance

Through a one-time inclusion of additional questions on the LFS, the Agency will develop measures of labour market performance, by field of study, for the highest and most recent educational credential obtained. Data collection is expected to take place in 2014, with results available in 2015.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Produce a file with labour market performance indicators by major field of study for respondents to the February 2014 LFS.

Planned activity: Review income, consumption and wealth statistics

Statistics Canada will review its program of income, consumption and wealth statistics with a view to ensuring regularly available, robust and well-integrated income, consumption and wealth data. Analysis will be released at a frequency that responds to the needs of government policy development, implementation and evaluation. The review will consider opportunities to reduce respondent burden and improve data quality by using administrative data sources and linking the various administrative and survey data sources. The review will be completed in 2014/2015, with proposals to be considered for funding in the 2015/2016 planning round.

Another important issue relates to the household sector's balance sheet. While the current set of financial and wealth statistics provide an indication of the overall health of its balance sheet, there is little information about the distribution of assets and liabilities held by households. With the release of the 2012 Survey of Financial Security, Statistics Canada will be able to decompose the aggregate household balance sheet estimates into various income quartiles and demographic groupings that will provide a better picture of the vulnerability of the sector to changes in such things as interest rates.

Also underway is an assessment of the Agency's income statistics to identify opportunities to re-use systems, reduce respondent burden and improve data quality by using administrative data sources and linking the various administrative and survey data sources. The assessment and a more detailed roadmap will be completed over two years, starting in 2014/2015.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Review the program of income, consumption and wealth, and establish a roadmap to be completed in 2015/2016.

Sub-program 2.2: Health and Justice Statistics

Program description

This program provides statistical information and analysis on the state of health of Canadians, and on criminal and civil justice in Canada. The program conducts the ongoing Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), and collects the data for, and maintains, Canada's vital statistics and the Canadian Cancer Registry. Health information is used to assist and support health planners and decision-makers at all levels of government, to sustain demographic and epidemiological research, and to report to the Canadian public on their collective health and health care system. Vital statistics data are used by the population estimates program, whose results are used for the equalization program. The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, the operational arm of a federal–provincial–territorial partnership known as the National Justice Statistics Initiative, strives to develop, implement and manage an effective national justice statistics program. The rationale for this program stems from a memorandum of understanding with Justice Canada and Cabinet decisions where Statistics Canada was named a partner in the National Justice Statistics Initiative. The program administers several surveys on crime reporting, homicide, police administration, adult and youth criminal courts, civil courts, adult corrections, expenditures personnel, and publishes key-indicator reports on adult and youth corrections. The program also administers the family violence statistical program funded by the Family Violence Initiative.

Table 7 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014/2015 Planned Spending 2015/2016 Planned Spending 2016/2017 Planned Spending
39,028,605 38,859,055 38,591,228
Table 8 Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017
260 259 255
Table 9 Performance Measurement
Table summary
This table displays the results of Performance Measurement. The information is grouped by Sub-program
Expected Results (appearing as row headers), Performance Indicators, Targets and Date to be Achieved (appearing as column headers).
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Government policy makers utilize health and justice statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100% March 31, 2015
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80% March 31, 2015
Number of media citations of health and justice statistics 450 March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

The justice statistics program provides data that are extensively used by partners in the National Justice Statistics Initiative to evaluate changes to the Criminal Code and their potential impact at all levels of government. The police community relies on the timely release of data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (from which the crime rate and the Crime Severity Index for both youth and adults are derived), as well as the Homicide Survey and the Police Administration Survey to evaluate their policies and programs. Stakeholders consistently rely on court data (both criminal and civil courts) and correctional services data to determine the impact of changes to legislation and to specific programming offered to individuals passing through the courts and correctional facilities.

The Socio-economic Statistics Program also measures the overall health of Canadians, and provides essential information on the determinants of health. Key indicators, including infant mortality, life expectancy, cancer incidence, obesity rates and chronic conditions, such as diabetes, are produced annually to enable Canadians to better understand the performance of the health care system. Specifically, the CHMS is being used to create reference intervals for the pediatric population in Canada: this will improve diagnostic capabilities among pediatricians. This survey also provides biomonitoring data to assess Canadians' exposure to environmental chemicals, which will be used by policy-makers to develop appropriate chemical management strategies.

Planned activity: Redesign the Canadian Community Health Survey

The CCHS provides information on the health status, health care utilization and health determinants of the Canadian population aged 12 and older. Health-related data are available by health region to support community-level policy-making and program development.

The CCHS began collecting health information from Canadians in 2001. The survey was initially done every two years: data are available for 2001, 2003 and 2005. The CCHS was redesigned in 2007 so that data could be collected every year.

To ensure continued relevance and data quality, the CCHS redesign will be implemented in 2015: an online response option will become available in January 2017. The redesign will include reviewing the content, revising the sampling strategy and developing the online response option.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Implement the sample allocation strategy.
  • Develop and test questionnaire applications based on the approved content plan.
  • Finalize the redesign for a January 2015 launch.
  • Continue developing an online questionnaire.

Planned activity: Finalize content and conduct a pilot test of a Children's Health Survey

Children under 12 years old are currently excluded from the CCHS; this is an important data gap. With funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and Health Canada, a pilot children's health survey will be undertaken in 2014/2015. This pilot will leverage the current infrastructure of the CCHS, and use the Canadian Child Tax Benefit file as the survey frame. Consultations began in 2013/2014 to determine the pilot survey content.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Finalize consultations to determine content.
  • Conduct qualitative testing of content.
  • Design and begin implementation of the pilot including building survey applications, sample design and collection.
  • Pilot test processing and begin assessment of the pilot survey results.

Planned activity: Build indicators of recontact with the justice system

In co-operation with representatives of the National Justice Statistics Initiative, a detailed multi-year, multi-phase project to create and deliver indicators of recontact with, and pathways through, the Canadian criminal justice system has been developed.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Test and evaluate cross-sector linkages between policing–courts, courts–corrections and corrections–policing in Saskatchewan.
  • Create preliminary cross-sector indicators.

Planned activity: Update Justice Survey Program

As required periodically, the Justice Survey Program is being updated to reflect the current Criminal Code of Canada: work is to be completed in 2014/2015. The Integrated Correctional Services Survey, which collects information on the nature and case characteristics of adult and youth under the supervision of the correction system, will be redesigned for the first time, after 10 years of operation under its current design.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Criminal code updates
    • Continue to implement updates according to defined jurisdictional roadmap.
    • Continue to update Integrated Criminal Court Survey.
    • Assess roadmap annually.
  • Integrated Correctional Services Survey redesign
    • National data requirements will be reviewed and updated with stakeholders.
    • A new survey processing system will be developed.
    • Detailed procedures will be created to develop interfaces for extracting data from partner systems.

Planned activity: Develop a generalized, integrated coding and correction environment

Developing a generalized, integrated coding and correction environment can satisfy the needs of all users while eliminating the IT and training costs of maintaining multiple systems. Such an environment also ensures efficient integration with other generalized systems and processes. The Agency will develop a single corporate environment for automated and manual coding and manual correction of data. This will consolidate and standardize automated and manual coding; facilitate an increase in automated coding, either during or after collection; and improve data quality by providing consistent quality assurance practices.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Work on the development of a generalized post-collection coding and correction environment.
  • Work begins towards the development of coding during data collection and other enhancements.

Planned activity: Continue towards common processing environments for survey and administrative data

The Agency has developed shared processing environments for business surveys and for household surveys. The environment being developed for household surveys will be designed for use in the Census of Population as well: core systems work is now largely completed. Beginning in 2013/2014, and continuing for the two years following, existing programs will be progressively linked to the new environment. Significant economies will be realized by maintaining a much smaller and more robust set of processing systems.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Continue to transition surveys to the Social Survey Processing Environment (SSPE): in particular, administrative data surveys in the justice and the income statistics sectors, business surveys in the business special surveys sector and social surveys in the travel statistics sector and the income statistics sector.
  • Continue to build and improve functionality of the common tools including incorporating the functionalities for developing, processing and disseminating electronic questionnaires into the SSPE.
  • Continue the development required to accommodate administrative surveys in the SSPE.

Sub-program 2.3: Demographic, Aboriginal and other Social Statistics

Program description

This program produces Canada's quarterly and annual post-censal and inter-censal population estimates and population projections that are used by all levels of government, the private sector, researchers and non-government organizations. Population estimates are used to satisfy the statutory requirements of the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Regulations, including the Canada Health and Social Transfers, the Equalization Program and the Wait Times Reduction Transfer. Territorial estimates are used in the Territorial Formula Financing. Population estimates are used to allocate federal seats to provinces under the Fair Representation Act. Population estimates must be used in connection with the following legislations: Canada Pension Plan Act, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act, Canada Student Loans Act, and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act. Data include components of population growth, namely: estimates of births, deaths, immigration, total emigration, change in non-permanent residents, and inter-provincial and intra-provincial migration.  This program also includes enabling access to microdata for research purposes and producing information and analytic outputs on key social issues, including immigration, visible minorities, religion, ethnicity, language, social identity, giving and volunteering, victimization, youth, families, gender, seniors, time use, care giving and receiving, and social well-being through the GSS.  The information is used to support various pieces of legislation including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Citizenship Act, the Multiculturalism Act, the Official Languages Act, and the Employment Equity Act.  The program provides information and subject matter expertise to help support the policy interests of Employment and Social Development Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Justice Canada, Canadian Heritage, and Status of Women Canada.  It is also responsible for providing subject matter expertise, coordination and integration in the collection, analysis and dissemination of data about Aboriginal people on topics such as education, use of Aboriginal languages, labour activity, income, health, communication technology, mobility and housing conditions, that are used by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Aboriginal governments and organizations.

Table 10 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014/2015 Planned Spending 2015/2016 Planned Spending 2016/2017 Planned Spending
11,026,484 10,996,430 10,987,799
Table 11 Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017
79 79 79
Table 12 Performance Measurement
Table summary
This table displays the results of Performance Measurement. The information is grouped by Sub-program
Expected Results (appearing as row headers), Performance Indicators, Targets and Date to be Achieved (appearing as column headers).
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Government policy makers use demographic, Aboriginal and other social statistics to make informed decisions. Percentage of intended key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) using the data regularly 100% March 31, 2015
Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the data 80% March 31, 2015
Number of media citations for each mission-critical program 250 March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

The demography program enables Statistics Canada to meet its legal obligation to provide the Minister of Finance with annual population estimates that are certified by Canada's Chief Statistician. The estimates are used to determine the amounts payable to the provinces and territories in accordance with the Federal–Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act and as per Territorial Formula Financing. Population estimates are used to administer the Canada Pension Plan Act, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act, the Canada Student Loans Act and the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act. In addition, population projections are prepared after each census, based on various assumptions about fertility, mortality and migration. Population projections are used, for example, to help plan programs and policies related to population aging and components of population growth such as international migration. Estimates and demographic projections are widely used by all levels of government, the private sector, researchers and non-governmental organizations.

The Aboriginal statistics component of the demography program activity provides subject-matter expertise, coordination and integration of the collection, analysis and dissemination of data about Aboriginal people. The topics that are addressed include education, use of Aboriginal languages, health and housing conditions. In this capacity, the Aboriginal statistics component provides information, support and advice to federal departments, as well as to Aboriginal governments and organizations.

For demographic statistics, annual population estimates are needed to determine the amounts payable under the Federal–Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, including the equalization program, the Canada Health and Social Transfer and the Wait Times Reduction Transfer. Territorial estimates are used in Territorial Formula Financing.

Population estimates are produced annually and quarterly by province and territory. Demographic projections are derived every five years, following the census. Various assumptions on population fertility, mortality and migration are used to define potential population growth scenarios.

In an attempt to fill some of the data gaps regarding the Aboriginal population, including registered Indians, Statistics Canada will explore the potential of administrative data sources, such as the Indian Register, for use in quality assessments of surveys and for other statistical purposes.

Microdata access will be expanded to include researcher access to data from the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). These data will be accessible at RDCs for approved projects and at Canadian postsecondary institutions for access to public-use microdata files through the Data Liberation Initiative.

A generalized tabulation tool for social data will be expanded to include additional statistics such as trend-analysis statistics. As well, data confidentiality rules for administrative data files will be implemented.

Planned activity: Deliver the Aboriginal Liaison Program

The Aboriginal Liaison Program serves as a bridge between Statistics Canada and the country's First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities as well as Aboriginal organizations. The program's mandate is to strengthen communications between Statistics Canada, the First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities and with other stakeholders at the national, regional, provincial and territorial and community levels with respect to developing and disseminating Aboriginal statistics.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Increase access to Statistics Canada's data, products and services, including improved accessibility for the 2011 Census program and the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.
  • Reach out to Aboriginal people on the value and use of data in planning and understanding the demographic dynamics of their community and population.

Planned activity: Rebase the population projections series

After completing the population estimates rebasing exercises in 2013/2014, the demography program will now rebase the population projections series to establish new projections, from 2013 to 2041. The program will also undertake the rebasing of the population microsimulation model, in conjunction with key federal departments, to produce projections for various population growth scenarios from 2011 to 2041. The rebasing will use the 2011 Census adjusted population counts for net undercoverage as a base, the NHS and other data sources.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Produce a new set of population projections for the years 2014 to 2041 using adjusted 2011 Census of Population counts as the base.
  • Prepare for the rebasing of the microsimulation projections model using data from the 2011Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey, as well as other data sources.

Planned activity: Expand research access to business and household microdata

Statistics Canada will continue to expand research based on business and household microdata by building on new technology capabilities, expanding data holdings available for research and working together with partner granting councils, universities and postsecondary institutes to ensure the greatest public good is achieved through researcher access to Statistics Canada microdata. The Agency will increase the capacity of its real time remote access tool to enable academic, federal, provincial and territorial researchers to securely work with microdata remotely from their desktops while preserving the security of confidential information. Statistics Canada has begun extensively training data librarians and provincial government stakeholders to ensure there are knowledgeable resources across the country who will be able to help researchers use this tool.

Statistics Canada, with its partners, is preparing a proposal for an expanded mandate of the Network of Canadian RDCs that will include new data acquisition, data development, metadata standardization, expanded technological and physical infrastructures as well as an emerging role in research data curation and archiving.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Open a new Federal RDC at Employment and Social Development Canada.
  • Develop a technical hub, based on real time remote access, for use in RDCs for automated table vetting and to provide additional security around the data.
  • Complete phase one of the data repository for all research files. Data in the repository will meet standardized naming conventions, version controls and centralized access permissions.
  • Publish the metadata from the RDC repository for external researchers to explore and compare with the public use microdata file metadata.
  • Conduct national training of data librarians from postsecondary institutions across Canada, including new training on the real time remote access tool.
  • Contribute to a proposal for an expanded mandate of the Network of Canadian RDCs.

Planned activity: Deliver the second phase of a corporate generalized tabulation tool

The Generalized Tabulation Tool (GTAB) project was launched to design and implement a generalized tool to support data tabulation. This project is in line with the overall approach to harmonizing business processes across the social, health and labour statistics field. The goal is to produce a suite of tools that will serve the needs of the dissemination and client-services communities, while also enabling external access to Statistics Canada's microdata through the real time remote access tool and for RDC researchers to potentially use the engine as a vetting tool.

The GTAB project will address inconsistencies in the standards concerning updating and applying confidentiality rules, which will enable better confidentiality protection in the changing dissemination environment at Statistics Canada.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Develop additional statistics, such as trend analysis statistics for LFS data.
  • Implement the data confidentiality rules for administrative data files in the application.

Sub-program 2.4: Analysis of Socio-economic Statistics

Program description

This program plans, directs, coordinates and conducts a range of statistical analyses and publications.  Substantive areas of analysis include population aging and its impacts on labour markets and health care needs, wait times and access to health care, the economic circumstances of immigrants, population health status,  impact of diseases and health determinants, and trends in income distribution including both low income / vulnerable populations and geographic patterns including Canada's major cities.  Analysis of income and labour market data, covering topics such as data on labour force status, occupation, labour compensation, pensions, industry, individual and family income and expenditure, for both the census and sample surveys, that are of interest to policy makers, academics, business leaders and individuals is also undertaken.  These activities serve four main functions and audiences:  providing high quality and often leading-edge analyses on important contemporary topics for the general public; providing information of direct relevance to matters of current policy concern; contributing more generally to the corpus of national and international research in the peer-reviewed literature; and also providing an important quality assurance role to verify the accuracy and relevance of the statistics produced, to assist users in interpreting the data, and to develop relevant concepts for the production of statistics. 

Table 13 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014/2015 Planned Spending 2015/2016 Planned Spending 2016/2017 Planned Spending
3,539,747 3,539,684 3,540,934
Table 14 Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017
37 37 37
Table 15 Performance Measurement
Table summary
This table displays the results of Performance Measurement. The information is grouped by Program
Expected Results
(appearing as row headers), Performance Indicators, Targets and Date to be Achieved (appearing as column headers).
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Government policy makers and public and private sector researchers use the results of statistical analyses, models, databases and other statistical information products for informed debate, research and decision-making on socio-economic and health issues. Percentage of key users (federal departments, provinces and territories, international organizations and others) satisfied with the analytical products 100% March 31, 2015
Number of media citations 100 March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

Planned activity: Examine and document ongoing changes in the Canadian labour force

The socio-economic analysis program will continue to examine and document ongoing changes in the Canadian labour force. The emphasis in 2014/2015 will be on different forms of labour adjustments that include geographic mobility, use of foreign workers, immigrant entrepreneurs, as well as changing skills and occupational requirements.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Data development and research on the follow topics:
    • Response of Canadian workers to employment opportunities outside of their region of residence.
    • Employment characteristics and outcomes of temporary foreign workers in specific admission categories.
    • Role of immigrant entrepreneurs in job creation and economic output.
    • Development, use and economic returns of different types of skills, levels of education and fields of study.

Planned activity: Conduct microdata simulation exercises to generate new insights

Agency analysts have demonstrated that combining existing survey and administrative data sets through microsimulation generates new insights. Statistics Canada currently supports five micro-simulation models:

1) The Social Policy Simulation Database and Model (SPSD/M) simulates the impact of various tax and other policy interventions on socio-economic outcomes. Some of the SPSD/M systems will be updated in 2014/2015 to reflect recent changes to federal and provincial policies.

2) The LifePaths model projects future pension and retirement incomes of Canadians, and models various pension reform scenarios. A consultation with a broad group of stakeholders and clients of LifePaths will leverage its full analytical potential, while putting it on a more sustainable path. Work continues to develop LifePaths: capacity will be added to model long-term care.

3) The Population Health Model (POHEM) performs comparative evaluations of health-related interventions on outcomes, such as prevalence of risk factors and disease, costs and economic indicators as well as health status and life expectancy. In 2014/2015, a comprehensive review will begin to consolidate existing components and to integrate new data sources to improve performance and functionality for a wider range of external users.

4) The Demosim model generates population projections for visible minority and Aboriginal populations. In 2014/2015, modules will be updated with new data on internal migrations, as well as intergenerational transfers of characteristics.

5) The PERSIM model is a workforce projection tool that supports human resources management at Statistics Canada and the federal government at large.

Specifically
2014/2015

  • Undertake consultations to use the analytical potential of LifePaths.
  • Review of POHEM components and integration of new data sources.
  • Rebase DEMOSIM with new data from the 2011 Census and other sources.
  • Transition PERSIM to new IT platform.
  • Transition SPSM to new IT platform.
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