Glossary – C

Canadian System of National Accounts glossary index – C

Canadian System of National Accounts glossary – C
Term Definition
Canada pension plan Consists of the operations of the Canada Pension Plan and the Quebec Pension Plan, established in 1966.

See also: Institutional sectors, Social security scheme, Pension plan, Pension fund
 
Canada bonds Direct bonds of the federal general government (of which, Canada Savings Bonds) and guaranteed federal enterprise bonds.

See also: Bonds, debentures and notes
 
Canadian financial assets abroad Regrouping of all Canadian financial claims on non-residents in the financial account of the balance of payments and in the international investment position.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Canadian financial liabilities abroad Regrouping of all non-resident financial claims on Canadian residents in the financial account of the balance of payments and in the international investment position.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Canadian residents Institutional units, such as households, non-profit institutions serving households, corporations and governments, which have a centre of predominant economic interest (a dwelling, a business location) in the economic territory of Canada.
 
Canadian System of National Accounts A coherent, consistent and integrated set of Canadian macroeconomic Accounts based on internationally agreed concepts, definitions, classifications and accounting rules. Closely related to the international standard defined by the United Nations' System of National Accounts.

See also: Canada's System of national economic accounts: An overview
 
Capital account This account records acquisitions and disposals of non-financial assets as a result of transactions with other units, flows linked to production (such as changes in inventories and consumption of fixed capital) and the redistribution of wealth by means of capital transfers. Records the values of non-financial assets that are acquired, or disposed of, by resident institutional units by engaging in transactions and shows the change in net worth due to saving and capital transfers.

See also: Account, Sequence of accounts, Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001.
 
Component of: Sequence of accounts

Composed of: Capital revenues, Capital expenditure, Net lending

Reference: About the balance of payments

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraphs 1.20, 10.2.

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Compte de capital
Capital and financial accounts This account shows, for each major sector; a) the saving and non-financial capital acquisition and the difference between them, called net lending; and b) transactions in financial assets, transactions in liabilities and the difference between them, called net financial investment. In theory, the two balancing items, net lending and net financial investment, are equal; in practice, imperfections in the statistics lead to a difference between the two, shown as a statistical discrepancy.

See also: Institutional sectors, Account, Sequence of accounts, Canada's System of national economic accounts: an overview
 
Reference: About the balance of payments

Source: Canada's Balance of Payments and International Investment Position, Concepts, Methods, Sources and Products, Catalogue no. 67-506

Notes: Discontinued with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Compte capital et financier
Capital consumption See consumption of fixed capital.
 
Capital cost Capital cost is defined as output less the labour cost and intermediate consumption. It represents the compensation to the owners of capital.

See also: Labour input, Intermediate consumption
 
Capital expenditures Expenditures by business or government on machinery, equipment, buildings and other goods that have useful lives of more than one year. Expenditures on major repairs to these goods are also included.
 
Capital formation See gross capital formation and gross fixed capital formation.
 
Capital fund A fund used to record the financing sources and expenditures for the acquisition, rehabilitation or replacement of capital assets. In general, capital assets refer to buildings, equipment, machinery and infrastructure.
 
Capital grant A non-compulsory transfer from one government unit or international organization to a second government unit or international organization in the form of cash that the recipient is expected or required to use to acquire an asset or assets other than inventories and cash.
 
Capital input Measures the services derived from the stock of assets used in production.
 
Composed of: The assets included are machinery and equipment, non-residential construction, and land. Beginning with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revisions, Weapons systems are included.

Source: About the productivity accounts

French: Entrée de capital
Capital per hour The ratio of capital services to hours worked.
 
Capital productivity Real output per unit of capital services.
 
Capital services See capital input.
 
Capital services price The capital cost per unit of capital services.
 
Capital stock Typically derived by cumulating capital formation in successive periods and deducting the amount that has been exhausted. The preferred technique is to estimate all capital still in stock at the price of a single period then revalued to the prevailing price, usually the first and last day of the accounting period.
 
Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraphs 18.31, 18.32.

French: Stock de capital
Capital tax A tax levied mainly by the federal and provincial or territorial governments on the paid-up capital of corporations.
 
Component of: Taxes

Composed of: Property taxes and Taxes on corporate capital

French: Impôts sur le capital
Capital transfer Unrequited transfers where either the party making the transfer realizes the funds involved by disposing of an asset (other than cash or inventories), relinquishing a financial claim (other than accounts receivable) or the party receiving the transfer is obliged to acquire an asset (other than cash) or both conditions are met.

See also: Capital account
 
Component of: transfers

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 8.10.

French: Transfert de capital
Cash accounting An accounting system that requires revenue and expenditures to be reflected in the accounts only when the related cash receipts and disbursements occur.
 
Component of: Accounting

French: Comptabilité de caisse
Cash treatment of economic entries Cash accounting records only cash payments and receipts at the times these payments or receipts occur.

See also: Account, Sequence of accounts, Financial Management System, Accrual treatment of economic entries
 
Component of: Accounting

Reference: About the government finance statistical program

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 3.164

French: Traitement des entrées économiques selon la comptabilité de caisse
Census A census refers to the collection of information about characteristics of interest from all units in a population.
 
Census value-added Output minus the value of materials, fuel and electricity consumed in the production process. Census value-added differs from value-added used in the Canadian System of National Accounts in that census value-added includes the cost of business services, such as insurance, advertising, transportation, communications, etc.
 
Central bank The national financial institution that exercises control over key aspects of the financial system. In Canada, the Bank of Canada carries out this control.

See also: Guide to the Public Sector of Canada, catalogue no. 12-589; Classification of Institutional Units by Sectors
 
Component of: Government business enterprises

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 4.104

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Banque centrale
Centre of predominant economic interest An institutional unit maintains a centre of predominant economic interest in a territory when it engages, or intends to engage, in economic activities or transaction on a significant scale either indefinitely or over a long period of time, usually interpreted as one year.
 
Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 1.48

French: Centre d'intérêt économique prépondérant
Chain Fisher price index A measure of the change in prices from period to period. It is calculated as the geometric mean of a chain Paasche price index and a chain Laspeyres price index. In other words, it is the mean of two distinct measures of change in prices: one calculated as if volumes were constant in the first of two consecutive periods (Laspeyres price) and the other calculated as if volumes were constant in the second of the two consecutive periods (Paasche prices).
 
Chain Fisher volume index A measure of the change in volume from period to period. It is calculated as the geometric mean of a chain Paasche volume index and a chain Laspeyres volume index. In other words, it is the mean of two distinct measures of change in volume: one calculated as if prices were constant in the first of two consecutive periods (Laspeyres volume) and the other calculated as if prices were constant in the second of the two consecutive periods (Paasche volume).
 
Chain index An index which is rebased on a period to period basis, accumulated multiplicatively from a base period value. For example, the chain Fisher volume index calculates the Fisher volume index in each pair of consecutive quarters, treating the earlier quarter as the base period.

See also: Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods, Catalogue no. 15-547.
 
Source: Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-017

French: Indice-chaîne
Chain Laspeyres volume index A measure of the change in volume from period to period. It is calculated as if prices were constant in the first of two consecutive periods. The indexes of each of the periods are linked together in a chain to form an index. Chain Laspeyres volume indexes are one of the components of the chain Fisher volume indexes that are the official measure of the Canadian System of National Accounts.
 
Chain Paasche volume index A measure of the change in volume from period to period. It is calculated as if prices were constant in the second of two consecutive periods. The indexes of each of the periods are linked together in a chain to form an index. The chain Paasche volume indexes are one of the components of the chain Fisher volume indexes that are the official measure of the Canadian System of National Accounts.
 
Change in ownership A change in ownership occurs when an asset has been received or a service or income is provided. Generally it is deemed to have occurred when the two parties record the transaction in their respective books or accounts.
 
Changes in inventories (including goods in process) Changes in inventories (including goods-in-process and work-in-progress) consist of changes in: a) stocks of outputs that are still held by the units that produced them prior to their being further processed, sold, delivered to other units or used in other ways; and b) stocks of products acquired from other units that are intended to be used for intermediate consumption or for resale without further processing; they are measured by the value of the entries into inventories less the value of withdrawals and the value of any recurrent losses of goods held in inventories.
 
Changes in net worth due to savings and capital transfers Changes in net worth due to saving and capital transfers represent the positive or negative amount available to the unit or sector for the acquisition of non-financial assets and financial assets.
 
Source: System of National Account 2008, paragraph 10.21

French: Variations de la valeur nette dues à l'épargne et aux transferts de capital
Changing the base period Involves redefining the base period on which the weightings are established.
 
Choice of a productivity measure In calculating productivity, a variety of measures of production (and thus inputs of production) can be used: value-added, gross output and sectoral output (or gross output less intra-industry sales). The choice of a measure of productivity will naturally depend on the user's analytical needs. For example, a measure based on sectoral output is useful because it allows for comparisons with the U.S. industry estimates.
 
Claims Financial instrument comprising Corporate claims and Government claims. Corporate claims are loans, advances and issues of debt between associated corporations; on the asset side, also includes investment in shares between associated corporations. Government claims are claims between governments, between related government business enterprises or between a parent government and its enterprises, in the form of shares, debt securities, loans or advances.
 
Source: Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-017

French: Créances
Classification of the functions of government A classification of transactions designed to apply to general government and its subsectors.

See also: Government, General government sector
 
Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 9.99

French: Classification des fonctions des administrations publiques
Combined inputs A weighted sum of inputs, particularly labour and capital. The weighting used to combine labour, capital and sometimes other factors (such as energy, raw materials and services) corresponds to the cost share for each input with respect to total revenue for the sector.

See also: Institutional sectors
 
Commercial services Account of services in the current account that comprises all services other than travel, transportation and government services, including the following: communications, construction, insurance, other financial, computer and information, royalties and license fees, non-financial commissions, equipment rentals, management, advertising, engineering, other technical, miscellaneous services to business and audio-visual.
 
Commodity See products.
 
Component of: Output, Final demand

French: Marchandises
Company A company may be a single institutional unit or contain more than one institutional unit. It can be comprised of a single legal entity or it can represent a consolidation of legal entities. It is the organisational unit for which income and balance sheet statements are maintained and from which operating profit and the rate of return on capital can be derived.
 
French: Compagnie
Compensation of employee The total remuneration, in cash or in kind, payable by an enterprise to an employee in return for work done by the latter during the accounting period. Compensation of employees is recorded on an accrual basis; that is, it is measured by the value of the remuneration in cash or in kind that an employee becomes entitled to receive from an employer in respect of work done during the relevant period, whether paid in advance, simultaneously or in arrears of the work itself. In productivity analysis, compensation of employees is equivalent to the cost of labour services.
 
Component of: Primary income

Composed of: Wages and salaries, Employer's social contributions

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 7.5.

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Rémunération des salariés
Computer software Consists of computer programs, program descriptions and supporting materials for both systems and applications software. Gross fixed capital formation in computer software includes both the initial development and subsequent extensions of software as well as acquisition of copies that are classified as assets.

See also: Balance sheet, Gross fixed capital formation.
 
Component of: Intellectual property products

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 10.110.

French: Logiciel informatique
Consolidated general government The consolidation of the data of the Federal general government, Provincial and territorial general governments, Local general governments, the Canada and Quebec pension plans, and the Aboriginal general governments. This entails combining the financial accounts of units within a government, or combining the financial accounts of different levels of governments (federal, provincial, territorial, etc.) to yield aggregate unduplicated financial statistics.

See also: Classification of Institutional Units by Sectors; Guide to the public sector of Canada, Catalogue no. 12-589
 
Consolidation A method of presenting data for a set of units as if they constituted a single unit. All transactions and debtor-creditor relationships among the units being consolidated are matched and eliminated.

See also: Consolidated general government
 
Constant prices Obtained by directly factoring changes over time in the values of goods and services into two components reflecting changes in the prices of the goods and services concerned and changes in their volumes (i.e., changes in “constant price terms”).
 
Consumer credit Credit extended to households for purchasing consumer goods or Consumer services.
 
Consumer goods New goods acquired by households for their own consumption.
 
Consumer services Services consumed by households, such as rental (including the rental imputed on owner-occupied housing), transportation, education, medical care, child care, food and accommodation services as well as travel expenditures of Canadians abroad, less travel expenditures of foreigners in Canada.
 
Consumption Consumption of goods and services is the act of completely using up the goods and services in a process of production (i.e., intermediate consumption) or for the direct satisfaction of human needs (i.e., final consumption). The activity of consumption consists of the use of goods or services for the satisfaction of individual or collective human needs.

See also: Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods, Catalogue no. 15-547
 
Component of: Gross domestic product, Current account

Composed of: Intermediate consumption, Final consumption

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 9.39

French: Consommation
Consumption of fixed capital The decline, during the course of the accounting period, in the current value of the stock of fixed assets owned and used by a producer as a result of physical deterioration, normal obsolescence or normal accidental damage. The terms depreciation, capital consumption allowance, and capital cost allowance are often used in place of consumption of fixed capital but are avoided in the System of national accounts since the term depreciation is often used in commercial accounting in the context of writing off historic costs, whereas in the System of National Accounts consumption of fixed capital is dependent on the current value of the asset. Consumption of fixed capital is calculated for all fixed assets owned by producers, but not for valuables (precious metals, precious stones, etc.) that are acquired precisely because their value, in real terms, is not expected to decline over time. Fixed assets must have been produced as outputs from processes of production as defined in the System of National Accounts. Consumption of fixed capital does not, therefore, cover the depletion or degradation of natural assets such as land, mineral or other deposits, coal, oil, or natural gas, or contracts, leases and licences.

See also: Capital input; Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods, Catalogue no. 15-547
 
Component of: Current Account

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraphs 6.240, 6.241

French: Consommation de capital fixe
Consumption of good or service A good or service that is used, without further transformation in production, by households, non-profit institutions serving households or government units, for the direct satisfaction of individual needs (or wants) or for the collective needs of members of the community.
 
Contingent liability Liabilities that may involve a legal contract but specify that one party is obliged to provide a payment or series of payments to another unit only if certain specified conditions prevail. In general, contingent liabilities are not included in the Canadian System of National Accounts.

See also: Liabilities
 
Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 3.40

French: Passif conditionnel
Contracts, leases and licenses Treated as assets only when two conditions are satisfied: a) The terms of the contract, lease or licence specify a price for the use of an asset or provision of a service that differs from the price that would prevail in the absence of the contract, lease or licence; b) one party to the contract must be able legally and practically to realize this price difference. The second condition presupposes that a market for the contract exists. It is recommended that in practice contracts, leases and licences should only be recorded in the accounts when the holder does actually exercise his right to realize the price difference.
 
Component of: Non-produced assets

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 10.16

French: Contrats, baux et licences
Contribution of capital intensity to labour productivity growth Calculated as the growth in capital services per hour times capital's share of nominal gross domestic product. It reflects the effects of capital investment on labour productivity growth.
 
Contribution of labour composition to labour productivity growth Calculated as the growth rate of labour composition times labour's share of nominal gross domestic product. It reflects the effects, on labour productivity growth, of skill upgrading as measured by increases in the experience and education composition of the workforce.
 
Contributions to percent changes The contribution of a sub-aggregate to the percent change in an aggregate. For example, if household expenditures increased 2% and the contribution to the percent change by motor vehicle purchases was 1%, then motor vehicle purchases have accounted for half of the increase in household expenditure.
 
Contributions to social insurance plans Employer and employee contributions to employment insurance, the Canada and Quebec pension plans and workers' compensation.
 
Coolers Spirits, wine or beer blended with non-alcohol beverages such as juices, sodas or colas. They have a various concentrations of alcohol.
 
Source: Financial Management System, Catalogue no. 68F0023

French: Coolers
Corporate claims See claims
 
Corporation Legally constituted corporations, cooperatives, limited liability partnerships, notional resident units and quasi-corporations.

See also: Establishment, Institutional Sectors
 
Component of: Enterprise

Composed of: Establishments, Ancillary units carrying on Ancillary activity

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 4.7

French: Société
Corporation profits before taxes The net earnings from economic activity of corporations, measured after deduction of capital consumption allowances.
 
Corporations Returns Act An Act intended to collect financial and ownership information from corporations conducting business in Canada and to use this information to evaluate the extent and effect of non-resident control of the Canadian corporate economy. The Corporations Returns Act (CRA) was administered by the Chief Statistician of Canada under the authority of the Minister of Industry. The Act was repealed in 1995. Previously known as Corporations Labour Unions Returns Act.
 
Corporations sector All resident corporations who are market producers.

See also: Enterprise, Company, Establishment, Institutional Sectors
 
Composed of: Financial corporations sector and the Non-financial corporations sector

Source: Foundations of Financial Management, S. B. Block, G.A. Hirt, J.D. Shirt, McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd, 1997 and Chart of Accounts Definition, Account No. 5.1.1

French: Secteur des sociétés
Cost of goods sold The cost specifically associated with units sold during the time period under study. It is calculated as the opening inventory at the beginning of the period plus direct cost of goods purchased or produced, minus closing inventory at the end of the period.
 
Source: Foundations of Financial Management, S. B. Block, G.A. Hirt, J.D. Shirt, McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd, 1997 and Chart of Accounts Definition, Account No. 5.1.1

French: Coût des biens vendus
Cost of produced capital The cost to the owner for the use of produced capital assets in a business activity. In theory, this cost can be calculated as rK+ d, where d is the rate of depreciation of the produced capital stock and rK is the return to produced capital.
 
Credit An accounting term representing a receipt (for example, the sale of goods or services), a decrease in assets or an increase in liabilities. Under the principle of double entry accounting, for every debit there must be a corresponding credit. In national accounting the terms "uses" and "resources" are used instead of debits and credits.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Credit market debt The sum of consumer credit, mortgage loans and non-mortgage loans.
 
Creditor approach There are two ways in which the value of a discounted security can be determined during its life when the prevailing interest rate is different from the rate prevailing when the security was initiated. The debtor approach is the perspective of the unit issuing the security and the creditor approach is the perspective of the unit holding the security. The first option, called the debtor approach, is to continue to use the rate prevailing on initiation throughout the instrument's life. The alternative, the creditor approach, is to use the current rate to estimate the value of interest between any two points in the instrument's life.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 17.261

French: Approche du créancier
Crown corporation A corporation created by a specific Act of Parliament or Legislature, owned by the Crown (Her Majesty in Right of Canada), controlled by the government, and accountable to the public through a Minister. It may operate either as a not-for-profit entity in the general government sector or as a for-profit entity in either the non-financial or the financial corporations' sector, depending on the nature of its activities.

See also: Institutional sectors, Government business enterprises
 
Reference: About the government finance statistical program

Source: Financial Management System, Catalogue no. 68F0023

Notes: Non-profit institutions are allocated to the corporations sectors when they are engaged in market production and to the general government sector if they are engaged in non-market production but subject to government control.

French: Société d'État
Currency and bank deposits Deposits denominated in Canadian dollars at chartered banks in Canada and at the central bank, plus Canadian notes and coin in circulation that are of fixed nominal values and are issued or authorized by the central bank or government.

See also: Balance sheet, Reserve asset
 
Component of: Currency and deposits

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 11.52

French: Argent liquide et dépôts
Currency and deposits Financial instruments comprising deposits denominated in Canadian and foreign currency at deposit-taking institutions in Canada and at the Bank of Canada as well as currency and coin in circulation. Deposit-taking institutions are licensed to accept deposits in Canada and include chartered banks, credit unions and caisse populaires and trust and mortgage loan corporations.

See also: Debt
 
Current In the context of economic accounting, the term current refers to the time at which the economic activity took place. “Current period” means the period of observation; it does not mean the present time nor the time of compilation.
 
Current account An account which covers all transactions (other than those in the capital and financial accounts) that involve exchange of economic values (goods, services and investment income) and current transfers. Consumption of fixed capital is entered in this account as an expense. Gross fixed capital formation is an expense of the capital account.

See also: Account, Sequence of accounts; Canada's System of national economic accounts: an overview; Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current account payments Regrouping of current account transactions which generate expenditures by Canadian residents with non-residents.
 
Current account receipts Regrouping of all current account transactions which generate revenues for Canadian residents from non-residents.
 
Current expenditure Expenses on current production (operating expenses) and current transfers to other sectors.

See also: Institutional sectors
 
Current grant See current transfers.
 
Source: Financial Management System, Catalogue no. 68F0023

French: Subvention courante
Current period Refers to the time at which an economic activity took place, meaning the period of observation, not the present time or the time of compilation.
 
Current prices Transactions, assets or liabilities are said to be expressed in current prices if the prices used in their valuation are the prices prevailing in the period of observation; that is both the quantity and the price components of the value series relate to the current period. Period-to-period changes in current price values may reflect changes in both quantities and prices.

See also: Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods, Catalogue no. 15-547
 
Current taxes on income, wealth, etc. Consists mainly of taxes on the incomes of households or profits of corporation and of taxes on wealth that are payable regularly every tax period (as distinct from capital taxes levied infrequently).

See also: Transfers
 
Component of: Current transfers

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 8.15

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Impôts courants sur le revenu, le patrimoine, etc.
Current transactions with non-residents Exports of goods and services less imports of goods and services, plus net investment income from non-residents and net current transfers from non-residents.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current transfers A current transfer is a transaction in which one institutional unit provides a good or service to another unit without receiving any good or service directly in return and does not oblige one or both parties to acquire, or dispose of, an asset.

See also: Institutional sectors; Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-017
 
Component of: Current account

Composed of: Current taxes on income, wealth, etc., Social contributions, Social benefits, Other current transfers

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 8.10

French: Transferts courants
Current transfers from corporations to households Charitable donations and other contributions.
 
Current transfers from government to business Subsidies to the business sector.

See also: Institutional sectors
 
Current transfers from government to households Payments such as the Child Tax Benefit Child Tax Credit, Employment Insurance benefits, old age security benefits, welfare payments, scholarships and research grants, workers' compensation benefits, grants to Aboriginal peoples and their organizations, pensions paid under the Canada and Quebec pension plans, and veterans' allowances.
 
Current transfers from government to non-residents Pensions paid to non-residents, contributions to international organizations and economic and technical assistance as well as food aid provided by the Canadian International Development Agency and other governmental agencies.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current transfers from households Income taxes, contributions to social insurance schemes and other current transfers.
 
Current transfers from households to corporations The transfer portion of interest on the consumer debt.
 
Current transfers from households to non-residents Remittances by Canadian residents (particularly religious and charitable organizations) to non-residents and withholding taxes paid abroad.

See also: See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current transfers from non-residents to government Withholding taxes paid by non-residents to the Government of Canada.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current transfers from non-residents to households Pensions paid by foreign governments to Canadian residents plus remittances by non-residents to Canadian residents.

See also: Canada's balance of payments, data quality, concepts and definitions, Catalogue no. 67-001
 
Current transfers to non-profit institutions serving households Transfers received by non-profit institutions serving households from other resident or non-resident Institutional units in the form of membership dues, subscriptions, voluntary donations, etc., whether made on a regular or occasional basis. Transfers are intended to cover the costs of the non-market production of non-profit institutions serving households or to provide the funds out of which current transfers may be made to resident or non-resident households in the form of social benefits.

See also: Non-profit institutions serving households sector, Institutional sectors
 
Component of: Transfers

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 8.132

French: Transferts courants aux institutions sans but lucratif au service des ménages
Customs basis See customs boundary.
 
Customs boundary Canada's international merchandise trade statistics record goods that cross Canada's international borders. Within the Canadian System of National Accounts, trade statistics on goods are adjusted to approximate data for the economic territory of Canada.

See also: Territorial enclaves
 
Date modified: