Glossary – H

Canadian System of National Accounts glossary index – H

Canadian System of National Accounts glossary – H
Term Definition
Harmonized System Classification system established to secure the highest degree of harmony and uniformity in the customs systems. This system is used to classify Canadian trade in goods.
 
Hazardous waste Waste that poses a risk to human or ecological health and requires special disposal techniques to make it harmless or less dangerous.
 
Source: Waste management industry survey, Catalogue no. 16F0023

French: Déchets dangereux
Hedonic method A regression technique used to estimate the prices of qualities or models that are not available on the market in particular periods, but whose prices in those periods are needed in order to construct price relatives; it is based on the hypothesis that the prices of different models for sale on the market at the same time are functions of certain measurable characteristics such as size, weight, power or speed and so regression methods can be used to estimate how much the price varies in relation to each of the characteristics.
 
Holding gains and losses Positive or negative nominal holding gains accrue during the accounting period to the owners of assets and liabilities as a result of a change in their prices. Holding gains include not only gains on “capital” such as fixed assets, land and financial assets but also gains in inventories of all kinds of goods held by producers, including work-in progress. The nominal holding gain on a non-financial asset is the value of the benefit accruing to the owner of that asset as a result of a change in its price over a period of time. The nominal holding gain on a financial asset is the increase in value of the asset, other than transactions in the assets (including the accrual of interest over a period of time) and other changes in the volume of assets. The nominal holding gain on a liability is the decrease in value of the liability, other than by transactions or by other volume changes. A nominal holding gain that is negative is referred to as a holding loss. A positive holding gain, whether due to an increase in the value of a given asset or a reduction in the value of a given liability, increases the net worth of the unit in question. Conversely, a holding loss reduces the net worth of the unit in question, whether due to a reduction in the value of a given asset or an increase in the value of a given liability. Holding gains and holding losses are not included in gross domestic product.

See also: Sequence of accounts
 
Component of: National Balance Sheet accounts

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraphs 3.105, 12.74

French: Gains et pertes de détention
Holding of own debt Refers to a case where a government holds as an investment, debt instruments that it has itself issued.
 
Hourly compensation See total compensation per hour worked.
 
Hours worked The total number of hours that a person spends working, whether paid or not. In general, this includes regular and overtime hours, breaks, travel time, training in the workplace and time lost in brief work stoppages where workers remain at their posts. Time lost to strikes, lockouts, annual vacation, public holidays, sick leave, maternity leave or leave for personal needs is not included.
 
Household A group of persons who share the same living accommodation and who pool some, or all of their income and wealth and consume certain goods and services collectively. They may engage in any other kind of economic activity.

See also: Final demand, Institutional sectors, Household's Unpaid Work, Catalogue no. 13-603
 
Component of: Households sector

Reference Gross Domestic Product by Industry, Sources and Methods, Catalogue no. 15-547

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 4.4

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Ménages
Household actual consumption The System of National Accounts makes a distinction between actual consumption, showing the amount of goods and services actually consumed, and consumption expenditure. Household actual consumption is greater than consumption expenditure because it includes expenditures incurred by general government and non-profit institutions serving households on behalf of individual households (for things such as health care and education).

See also: Canada's System of national economic accounts: an overview
 
Reference: Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-017

Source: System of National Accounts 2008, paragraph 1.76

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Consommation effective
Household debt service ratio Household debt service ratio equals household mortgage and non-mortgage interest paid, divided by disposable income.
 
Household expenditures on goods and services Household spending on new consumer goods and on consumer services, plus any margins on used goods. Operating expenses of associations of individuals serving households are also included, under consumer services.
 
Reference: Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-017, Chapter 7 - Personal expenditures on consumer goods and services.

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Dépenses des ménages en biens et services
Household sector All resident household and their unincorporated businesses in the case of the Income and Outlay Accounts, the Capital and Financial Accounts and the National Balance Sheets Accounts. In the Production Account households' unincorporated businesses are excluded.

See also: Institutional Sectors, Canada's System of national economic accounts: An overview, Classification of Institutional Units by Sector
 
Component of: The six sectors of the Canadian economy

Notes: Introduced with the Canadian System of National Accounts 2012 historical revision.

French: Secteur des ménages
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