Transcript of the chat session on Education and Labour data, 2011 National Household Survey, which occurred on Friday, June 28, 2013 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. EDT

Note: This was a bilingual chat session, which means that the participants were able to submit their questions in English or French. Statistics Canada respects the Official Languages Act and is committed to ensuring that information products of equal quality are available in both English and French. For that reason, all the questions and answers have been translated in the other official language.

 Moderator: Hello everyone. The chat session will begin in just 5 minutes. Our experts on Education and Labour data, Sarah Jane Ferguson, Johanne Denis, Diane Galarneau and Martin Turcotte will be answering your questions regarding this second release of the 2011 National Household Survey. Stay tuned!
Friday, June 28, 2013 12:25:48

 Moderator: Welcome everyone. It is 12:30 p.m. EDT and the session is now open. This is a bilingual chat session, which means that you can submit your questions in English or French. The experts will try to get to them in a timely manner and they will respond in the official language in which the question was asked.
Friday, June 28, 2013 12:30:48

 Janice Plumstead:  Regarding Aboriginal data: 1. Will there be detailed data available for on- and off reserve First Nations regarding education attainment? By province? 2.Will data be available for Aboriginal education attainment by province? If so, will it be possible to compare Aboriginal versus non-Aboriginal educational attainment by province?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:30:30

 Sarah Jane Ferguson: Good afternoon: there are detailed educational attainment data available for First Nations people with registered Indian status living on and off reserve for Canada and the provinces and territories. Here is a link to these data: Secondary (High) School Diploma or Equivalent (14), Labour Force Status (8), Aboriginal Identity (8), Area of Residence: On Reserve (3), Registered or Treaty Indian Status (3), Age Groups (13B) and Sex (3) for the Population Aged 15 Years and Over, in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2011 National Household Survey. There is also a table with detailed educational attainment data for Aboriginal people as well as non-Aboriginal people for Canada and the provinces. Here is a link to these data: Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Aboriginal Identity (8), Major Field of Study - Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) 2011 (14), Attendance at School (3), Age Groups (13B) and Sex (3) for the Population Aged 15 Years and Over, in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2011 National Household Survey. Thank you for your questions. Sarah Jane
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:37:13

 SumonM:  In some of the data tables (e.g., 99-012-X2011028), there is a category entitled "Language Used Most Often At Work." How does this correspond to their labour force status - are all respondents employed, or just in the labour force (employed + unemployed)? Thanks very much.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:32:10

 Diane Galarneau: Hello: the question on "language used most often at work" was asked to anyone who worked in 2010 or 2011, irrespective of his/her employment status at the moment of the survey.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:35:24

 Nicole:  Hello, I would like to know if the level of educational attainment of Franco-Ontarian women is comparable to that of Ontario women.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:32:51

 Johanne Denis: Hello Nicole, there is a table at the following link (NHS Catalogue no.: 99-012-X2011026) which covers only the population 15 years and older who have been working since 2010. You can request a customized table that will provide a more specific answer to your question. Thank you.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:38:41

 ocapao: How has Statistics Canada dealt with non-response bias?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:34:54

 Moderator: ocapao, thank you for your question. Unfortunately, our subject matter experts are not able to provide an answer during this session. We will follow up with you by email.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:34:24

 Crystalcity: What trend is there in agriculture labour? How will affect succession planning within that industry?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:36:20

 Diane Galarneau: Hello Crystalcity, thanks for your question. The employment share in agriculture was 2.4%, which was similar to the share observed in the 2006 Census (3.0%). Managers in agriculture also stand out as the occupation with the highest share of workers aged 55 and over in 2011. The median age was 54.7% compared to 42.6 years for the total workforce. Managers in agriculture was the occupation having one of the oldest median ages in 2011.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:42:40

 NBeynon: How much on the data will we be able to compare year to year and if we can compare, is there specific wording that you recommend we use such as the percentage of people without a degree or diploma from 2006 Census to 2011 NHS.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:37:21

 Sarah Jane Ferguson: Good afternoon: the 2006 Census and the 2011 National Household Survey are two different surveys with different methodologies. In our release we focused on 2011, and made only limited comparisons to 2006 for context. The education variables were tested for quality prior to release. The variables were compared to other sources (such as the Labour Force Survey) and the data were found to be similar. When comparing to the 2006 Census, it is important to remember that the target populations were slightly different. There is more information available in the Education Reference Guide on the quality of the data for the education variables. To show progress across generations, comparing age cohorts is useful (for example comparing the proportion of the population aged 25 to 34 with a given characteristic compared with the similar characteristic among those aged 55 to 64). Thank you for your question, Sarah Jane
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:48:57

 Laurent: Hey there! As a statistics student, I have to ask how the "voluntary" aspect of the survey affects the reliability of the research that could be conducted using the data from the NHS. I understand the response rate is pretty high, but that does not ensure unbiasedness... Thank you!
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:37:44

 Moderator: Laurent, thank you for your question. Unfortunately, our subject matter experts are not able to provide an answer during this session. We will follow up with you by email.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:37:01

 Damon Rondeau: I'm wondering about labour force availability data by employment equity groups. I understand that HRSDC produces this information and the source has been Census. Will the transition to the NHS affect the availability and/or quality of this information? I understand you folks represent Stats Can, but there are employment equity employers out here who haven't seen a refresh of availability data since 2006. Very difficult to assess our current state or our progress with reference data that old. Could you comment on the situation?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:38:01

 Martin Turcotte: Thank you for your question. The release yesterday focused on the detailed occupations according the National Occupation Classification (2011) to the four-digit level. We have not currently analyzed further the data beyond what was released yesterday. At the detailed four-digit level, the data are considered to be good quality for most levels of geography. The quality of the information per employment equity group will depend on the level of details required (e.g., characteristics, geography) for analysis. Until this information is analyzed, we are unable to give further information on the data quality for the employment equity groups.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:55:49

 Jill Halyk: How did you determine the statistical reliability of the statistics related to aboriginal education levels (especially when there's a low response rate to the census by aboriginals)?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:38:18

 Sarah Jane Ferguson: Good afternoon: the statistical reliability of data related to Aboriginal education levels was determined in a similar fashion to that of the National Household Survey (NHS) overall. In general, the NHS estimates for Aboriginal peoples are of good quality. Enumeration on reserve and in the North was interviewer administered to 100% of the population. In general, these areas had a good response rate to the NHS. The majority of First Nations communities participated in the NHS. Of all reserves in Canada, there was 96% participation. Statistics Canada is not publishing data for communities with a global non-response rate of 50% and over. There is more information available on both the Aboriginal variables as well as the Education variables in the Reference Products section of the website: Thank you for your question, Sarah Jane
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:58:31

 John Lundy: How does the Incompletely Enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements rate in the 2011 NHS compare with the rates for the 2b 2001 and 2006 census data?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:40:18

 Moderator: John Lundy, thank you for your question! Unfortunately, our subject matter experts are not able to provide an answer during this session. We will follow up with you by email.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:40:19

 Scholtens: What approach has Statistics Canada taken regarding the problems with the non-random sampling protocol used to collect these data and the resulting statistical bias in these data? What does this statistical bias mean for making inferences about the Census Division level populations? Or are these data from a statistically random sample and deemed to be representative of the actual population?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:41:35

 Moderator: Scholtens, thank you for your question. Unfortunately, our subject matter experts are not able to provide an answer during this session. We will follow up with you by email.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:41:12

 Meredith Quaile: I would like to echo the question from: Crystalcity: What trend is there in agriculture labour? How will affect succession planning within that industry? and also note that this labour group is predominantly male and over 55 - what can be done to address this downward trend?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:42:57

 Diane Galarneau: Hello Meredith Quaile and thank you for your question. As I wrote to Crystalcity:, the employment share of the agriculture industry is similar in 2011, 2.4%, to what it was in 2006, 3.0%. The share of men is 75.2%.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:55:19

 Babita: Can distribution of the employed population aged 15 years and over, by NOC skill level be available for the 3rd digit NOC classification and below? An example of 3rd digit NOC classification will be 313 Pharmacists, dietitians and nutritionists; where as an example of further classification will be 3131 Pharmacists 3132 Dietitians and nutritionists Thanks.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:43:25

 Diane Galarneau: Hello Babita, thanks for your question. I've included a link to a table (NHS Catalogue no.: 99-012-X2011033). This is at the very detailed level (4 digit). You can use the second digit of the code to see the skill level. If you need help on how to derive it, feel free to call me later this afternoon: 613-951-4626.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:03:22

 Nicole: Hello. Given women's high graduation rate at the university level, I would like to know if you have any data on their subsequent career. Do they get management positions? And what about Francophone women outside Quebec?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:48:27

 Johanne Denis: Hello Nicole. Generally, employment rates increase with education level. We don't have a data table showing the breakdown by sex. You can check the following table (NHS Catalogue no.: 99-012-X2011028) which provides information on the employed workforce by occupation, various language variables and the highest certificate, diploma or degree earned: Your question could be answered with a request for a customized product. Thank you.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:56:34

 Kabutol_1: I am familiar with the portrait of Franco-Ontarian immigration (Statistics Canada, 2011). Out of a total population of 12,851,821 in Ontario , there are 611,500 Francophones. I would like to get the description and characteristics of these Francophones. In other words, who are they? How many of them are families? How many of these families are couples? How many of these couples have children? How old are these children? How many of them are between 6 and 13 years of age? How many are at the elementary level? Thank you.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:51:34

 Johanne Denis: Hello Kabutol. The National Household Survey does not provide information on school attendance for the population under 15 years. In terms of the other questions, I suggest that you check our various topic-based census tabulations published in 2012, such as the following table: 2011 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations (Catalogue no.: 98-314-XCB2011019) which provides information on languages used in families. Many other tables are available at the following address (2011 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations). Thank you.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:06:41

 Janice Plumstead: Thank you for the direction to the Aboriginal education attainment tables by province. I'm echoing another question regarding how comparable the 2011 data is against the 2001 and 2006 Census data?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:52:16

 Sarah Jane Ferguson: Good afternoon: the 2006 Census and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) are two different surveys with different methodologies. When comparing to the previous censuses, it is important to remember that the target populations were slightly different. For the Aboriginal variables, in the 2011 NHS there were 36 incompletely enumerated reserves. These may be different reserves from those that were incompletely enumerated in the 2006 or 2001 Censuses. This makes comparisons over time more challenging. There is more information available in the reference guides for Aboriginal people and education on the quality of the data for these variables. To show progress across generations, comparing age cohorts is useful (for example comparing the proportion of the population aged 35 to 44 with a given characteristic compared with the similar characteristic among those aged 55 to 64). Thank you for your question, Sarah Jane
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:12:19

 Babita: We can perhaps get the average age of respective workforce by NOC classification through this survey. Can we also get any information on recent workforce exits or retirements from this survey, classified by NOC?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:53:20

 Martin Turcotte:  Thank you for your question. The data released yesterday included standard products that provided the age distributions, per age group, by all levels of the NOC. The standard products do not include the average (or median) age but these could be available if you wish to make a customized data request. From the standard product, however, you can calculate, for example, the percentage of the workforce 55 years or over (or 65 years or over). The NHS does not collect information on retirement or recent exits. However, for persons who were not working at the time of the reference week, the NHS collected information on their previous main job over the period of January 2010 to the NHS collection day. The reason for not working is not collected.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:10:31

 Jill Halyk: How do you measure apprenticeship certificates? is there overlap with people completing certification and college graduates or are they two distinct categories?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:53:27

 Sarah Jane Ferguson: Good afternoon: in the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS), question number 28 is on the trades with two categories (which is where you will find a category for those with a Registered Apprenticeship certificate including Certificate of Qualification/Journeyperson's designation). Question 29 is on college, CEGEP or other non-university certificates or diplomas. In this question, respondents are reminded not to repeat their trades qualification. As we note in our education reference guide, analysis suggests that there may be some overlap in reporting by respondents between the trades and college categories. More information on data quality can be found in the Education Reference Guide, Thank you for your question. Sarah Jane
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:22:12

 SumonM: Would a special tabulation be available on "highest certificate, diploma, or degree" by "field of study" by "industry" (NAICS 2 or 4 digits) or occupation code (NOCs)?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:53:30

 Johanne Denis: Thank you for your question. Here is a link to a data table (NHS Catalogue no.: 99-012-X2011035) by occupation and field of study for the highest certificate, diploma or degree.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:14:27

 Crystalcity: @ Meredith, good point on the gender roles associated with the Ag industry...could a marketing strategy be put in place to attract female workers be put in place? I know within BC we have a time trying to acquire agrologists for our program areas...this all leads to the further assimilation of small farms into larger corporate ones. Does the data reflect small farm labour to larger ones?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:55:30

 Martin Turcotte: Hi Crystalcity: the National Household Survey does not collect information on farm size. However, the Census of Agriculture does gather information on the number of farms in Canada, their size in acres and the number of people employed on farms. Here is a link to the Census of Agriculture release in The Daily.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:17:35

 Margaret: We are interested in the relationship between the Labour Force Survey data and the NHS employment. In 2011 we are seeing a large divergence between the number of employed in these two surveys, which historically have tracked very closely, with our CMA being reported about 12% below Labour Force Survey. What would be the explanation for the unprecedented difference between these two indicators? How reliable are the NHS employed values at the CMA or CSD levels?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 12:56:49

 Diane Galarneau: Hello Margaret, thanks for your question. The NHS and LFS are both robust sources of estimates on the Canadian labour market. There are differences between LFS and NHS and previous censuses, which have historically resulted in differences in the estimates between the two sources. When comparing estimates from the LFS and NHS (or previous censuses), it is important to keep in mind these differences. Overall, the differences between the two sources can be classified in four categories: population base, target population, questions to measure the concepts, and differences related to the collection mode. When determining which of the two sources to use, analysts must consider their research requirements. The quality of the NHS estimates at the CMA and CSD levels is measured by the global non-response rate. When this rate is over 50%, the data are suppressed, but the responses are still available at higher geographic level.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:20:57

 Meredith Quaile: @ Crystalcity - thanks and good idea to look at ways to attract women to agriculture, although that would need to be addressed regionally, as farming practices and seasons are so varied and workforce requirements fluctuate. @ StatsCan - What is the best way to extract/disaggregate stats on girls (15-18 or 15-24 age ranges) from the NHS for education and (initial) employment; and, is this data more accessible from the NHS or from the census?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:01:42

 Johanne Denis: Thank you for your question. Education data are available from the National Household Survey, not the census. The following two tables might be of interest: NHS Catalogue no. 99-012-X2011035 and NHS Catalogue no. 99-012-X2011037.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:22:20

 eric_INSPQ: Hello. Are the data from the National Household Survey available for dissemination areas?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:02:14

 Moderator: Hello. These data are not yet available for dissemination areas. However, you can acquire this information by submitting a request to Statistics Canada's Custom Services. You can contact us at the following number: 1-800-263-1136. Thank you for your question.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:00:34

 Nicole:  The study "Portrait of Canada's Labour Force" states that the "three industrial sectors with the largest employment shares in 2011 were retail trade, health and social assistance and manufacturing." I'd like to know whether you have data on the average wages in each of these sectors and on the male/female and age distributions.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:02:19

 Diane Galarneau: Hello Nicole and thank you for your question. Data on average wages will be available on August 14.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:06:59

 Kabutol_1: Hello! I asked a question at 12:51:54 under the name of Kabutol_1. I have not yet received a response! Did you forget me?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:14:10

 Moderator: Hello, Johanne Denis already answered your question at 13:06. Thank you for your question!
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:12:36

 Nicole: The study "Portrait of Canada's Labour Force" states that the "three industrial sectors with the largest employment shares in 2011 were retail trade, health and social assistance and manufacturing." I understand that the data on wages will be available in August. However, do you have information on the male/female distribution in each of these sectors?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:15:12

 Martin Turcotte: Hello Nicole. You can find out the number of men and women who have a job in these sectors, for Canada, the provinces and the metropolitan areas. You can also differentiate between workers based on their age group. Thank you for your question.  Please see the next table (NHS Catalogue no.: 99-012-X2011034).
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:24:14

 Margaret: Statistics Canada cautions against comparing the results of the NHS with results from the Census, especially at low levels of geography, as they are different survey instruments. For example, we understand there is a risk in comparing the mode share as reported in the 2011 NHS to mode share reported from the 2006 Census. Why has Statistics Canada felt comfortable in publishing such comparisons between 2006 and 2011 at the CMA level in the Analytical Products?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:22:50

 Diane Galarneau: In the analytical document, we made some comparisons between Census 2006 and NHS 2011 in order to provide some context. At the CMA level, for this variable, the data were considered of good quality. However, we also provided caution to users when comparing the two data sources.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:28:41

 Kabutol_1: Johanne Denis already responded to your question at 13:06? But I don't see the response. Could you resend it to me please?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:23:30

 Moderator: I don't understand why you are not seeing the response on your screen, but we could email it to you in a few minutes if you like.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:21:52

 rkhamilton: Hi - Can you tell me if the questions and responses will be posted after today's session?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:24:35

 Moderator: hi rkhamilton, a transcript will be posted at the "Chat with an Expert" website after the session.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:24:42

 Meredith Quaile: @ StatsCan - What is the best way to extract/disaggregate stats on girls (15-18 or 15-24 age ranges) from the NHS for education and (initial) employment; and, is this data more accessible from the NHS or from the census?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:27:00

 Bonita: Hi Diane and Martin, I live in Coquitlam, BC and have just started my own business recruiting for boomers in my area. I would like to be able to use some of this data to understand my community profile. Is it possible to see the Coquitlam data separate from Port Moody and Port Coquitlam. If so, how do I do that? Also, is there and easy way to look at growth/decline vs last census data.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:27:16

 Moderator: Information on the Coquitlam, BC community is available as a part of the publically available profiles. The profile has information on employment characteristics and age profiles for that community, distinct from Port Moody and Port Coquitlam. We do not offer direct comparisons between data from the 2006 Census and the 2011 NHS.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:28:58

 Kabutol_1: I need the answer urgently for my research. Here is the question. Kabutol_1: I am familiar with the portrait of Franco-Ontarian immigration (Statistics Canada, 2011). Out of a total population of 12,851,821 in Ontario, there are 611,500 Francophones. I would like the description and characteristics of these Francophones. In other words, who are they? How many of them are families? How many of these families are couples? How many of these couples have children? How old are these children? How many of them are between 6 and 13 years of age? How many are at the elementary level?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:30:30

 Moderator: We're sorry! We will follow up by email in a few minutes.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:30:39

 Damon Rondeau: Thanks for your answer, Martin. As a follow-up: if Stats Can still needs to do some analysis before it has a position on labour force representation by NOC by geographic unit by equity group, does it follow that HRSDC is in a similar position of uncertainty?
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:33:13

 Moderator: Thanks for your question. The chat session has now closed, so we will get back to you shortly by email.
Friday, June 28, 2013, 13:32:48

 Moderator: Thank you for all your questions and comments! It is 1:33 p.m. EDT, which means that the chat session is now over. If the experts didn't have a chance to respond to your question, they will follow-up by email in the next few days. The full transcript of this chat session will be made available on the website shortly. Have a great day!
Friday, June 28, 2013 13:32:22

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