Statistics by subject – Agriculture

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All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114041
    Description:

    A pulse is an edible seed harvested from the pod of a variety of annual leguminous plants. Pulses grown in Canada include, mainly, dry beans, dry peas, lentils and chickpeas. Pulse area and production in Canada has increased since the 1980s, making the country one of the leading producers and exporters of pulses worldwide.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400113006
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111905
    Description:

    The structure of the agriculture industry changed significantly over the last two decades. There are fewer but larger farms contributing to Canadian agriculture production. Since 1991, the average farm area increased, while the number of farm operators decreased. The average age of farm operators also increased.

    Release date: 2014-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050068759
    Description:

    Zero tillage is a relatively recent innovation on Canadadian farms however, it may not always be suitable for all crop and soil conditions. Zero till practices matched appropriately to crop and field conditions have the potential to reduce agriculture's impacts on the environment and lower energy and labour costs. The main sources of data are from Statistics Canada's 2001 Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) and the 2001 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2005-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040026798
    Description:

    Most Canadians would probably be surprised to learn that floriculture receipts are closing in on wheat, finishing in 2002 only 20% below the $2.3 billion earned from wheat. This note documents the shift in farming towards floriculture and nursery products in recent years, including which provinces have driven their growth and why farmers find these crops more appealing.

    Release date: 2004-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030096514
    Description:

    Over the last few years, the rapid expansion of large livestock operations has fuelled heated debates in many rural communities across Canada. Proposals for new hog operations, among others, have encountered vocal opposition from neighbours and residents in the community. Promoters defended the economic value of their project claiming that good farming practices and improved technology minimizes the potential risk of nuisance and pollution. However, opponents raised concerns about the reduction of their quality of life in association with large livestock operations, especially hog farms. They fear being driven out of their homes by strong odours or worry about accidental contamination of ground water in surrounding areas, as in Walkerton, Ontario. Still others are upset by prospects of added truck traffic, dust and noise resulting from feed and livestock transportation.

    Release date: 2003-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036482
    Description:

    Since their introduction in the mid-1990s, genetically modified seeds have become increasingly popular among Eastern Canadian corn and soybean producers. These producers use the seeds to limit insect damage to crops, or to provide their crops with a resistance to herbicides that would otherwise kill the plants.

    Statistics Canada has collected data on genetically modified soybeans and corn in Quebec and Ontario for the past three years. In its field crop surveys, the Agency has tracked plantings, harvestings, production and expected yields for soybeans and corn grown from genetically modified seeds.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036478
    Description:

    Total income of farm families is derived from 1999 personal income tax returns of family members. The estimates refer to the income of families involved in a single unincorporated farm, showing a gross operating revenue of $10,000 and over. Families are defined as husband and wife, legal or common-law, with or without children at home; or lone parent, of any marital status, with at least one child living at home. There is no restriction on the age of the children. Children must report a marital status other than "married" or "living common-law" and have no child living in the household. In 1999, these families operated 150,500 farms, accounting for 76.5% of the total number of unincorporated farms (single operations) reporting a gross revenue of $10,000 and over.

    Net farm operating income refers to the profit (or loss) from performance of farm operations based on total operating revenues, including all program payments, less total operating expenses, before deducting depreciation.

    In 1998, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) developed a farm typology, which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than classification based on size, contribution to total agricultural production, or national net farm operating income. Factors such as age, income, business intentions and revenue class have been used to categorize farm operators and farm families into distinct groups. A description of the farm types is presented at the end of this article.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20021036174
    Description:

    Crop production across western Canada was lower in 2001 as a result of drought conditions. The grains industry has been drawing comparisons with the 1988 season, the last year a general drought reduced production. There are differences between the drought of 2001 and the drought of 1988. This article will examine some of these differences.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035612
    Description:

    This article gives a "snapshot" of where the larger concentrations of livestock were in May 1996. This information would be useful to planners, investors, non-governmental organizations, rural communities, and governments. This could help them decide where to expand livestock production without putting the environment at risk.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034497
    Description:

    The 1996 Census of Agriculture reported the highest share of census-farm operators over 60 years of age in Canadian history. The share has been increasing since 1981. Are farmers a dying phenomenon? Are there any young farmers? The purpose of this article is to review the census-farm operator age structure to understand some reasons for an apparent ageing of the census-farm operator population.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

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Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114041
    Description:

    A pulse is an edible seed harvested from the pod of a variety of annual leguminous plants. Pulses grown in Canada include, mainly, dry beans, dry peas, lentils and chickpeas. Pulse area and production in Canada has increased since the 1980s, making the country one of the leading producers and exporters of pulses worldwide.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400113006
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111905
    Description:

    The structure of the agriculture industry changed significantly over the last two decades. There are fewer but larger farms contributing to Canadian agriculture production. Since 1991, the average farm area increased, while the number of farm operators decreased. The average age of farm operators also increased.

    Release date: 2014-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050068759
    Description:

    Zero tillage is a relatively recent innovation on Canadadian farms however, it may not always be suitable for all crop and soil conditions. Zero till practices matched appropriately to crop and field conditions have the potential to reduce agriculture's impacts on the environment and lower energy and labour costs. The main sources of data are from Statistics Canada's 2001 Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) and the 2001 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2005-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040026798
    Description:

    Most Canadians would probably be surprised to learn that floriculture receipts are closing in on wheat, finishing in 2002 only 20% below the $2.3 billion earned from wheat. This note documents the shift in farming towards floriculture and nursery products in recent years, including which provinces have driven their growth and why farmers find these crops more appealing.

    Release date: 2004-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030096514
    Description:

    Over the last few years, the rapid expansion of large livestock operations has fuelled heated debates in many rural communities across Canada. Proposals for new hog operations, among others, have encountered vocal opposition from neighbours and residents in the community. Promoters defended the economic value of their project claiming that good farming practices and improved technology minimizes the potential risk of nuisance and pollution. However, opponents raised concerns about the reduction of their quality of life in association with large livestock operations, especially hog farms. They fear being driven out of their homes by strong odours or worry about accidental contamination of ground water in surrounding areas, as in Walkerton, Ontario. Still others are upset by prospects of added truck traffic, dust and noise resulting from feed and livestock transportation.

    Release date: 2003-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036482
    Description:

    Since their introduction in the mid-1990s, genetically modified seeds have become increasingly popular among Eastern Canadian corn and soybean producers. These producers use the seeds to limit insect damage to crops, or to provide their crops with a resistance to herbicides that would otherwise kill the plants.

    Statistics Canada has collected data on genetically modified soybeans and corn in Quebec and Ontario for the past three years. In its field crop surveys, the Agency has tracked plantings, harvestings, production and expected yields for soybeans and corn grown from genetically modified seeds.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036478
    Description:

    Total income of farm families is derived from 1999 personal income tax returns of family members. The estimates refer to the income of families involved in a single unincorporated farm, showing a gross operating revenue of $10,000 and over. Families are defined as husband and wife, legal or common-law, with or without children at home; or lone parent, of any marital status, with at least one child living at home. There is no restriction on the age of the children. Children must report a marital status other than "married" or "living common-law" and have no child living in the household. In 1999, these families operated 150,500 farms, accounting for 76.5% of the total number of unincorporated farms (single operations) reporting a gross revenue of $10,000 and over.

    Net farm operating income refers to the profit (or loss) from performance of farm operations based on total operating revenues, including all program payments, less total operating expenses, before deducting depreciation.

    In 1998, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) developed a farm typology, which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than classification based on size, contribution to total agricultural production, or national net farm operating income. Factors such as age, income, business intentions and revenue class have been used to categorize farm operators and farm families into distinct groups. A description of the farm types is presented at the end of this article.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20021036174
    Description:

    Crop production across western Canada was lower in 2001 as a result of drought conditions. The grains industry has been drawing comparisons with the 1988 season, the last year a general drought reduced production. There are differences between the drought of 2001 and the drought of 1988. This article will examine some of these differences.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035612
    Description:

    This article gives a "snapshot" of where the larger concentrations of livestock were in May 1996. This information would be useful to planners, investors, non-governmental organizations, rural communities, and governments. This could help them decide where to expand livestock production without putting the environment at risk.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034497
    Description:

    The 1996 Census of Agriculture reported the highest share of census-farm operators over 60 years of age in Canadian history. The share has been increasing since 1981. Are farmers a dying phenomenon? Are there any young farmers? The purpose of this article is to review the census-farm operator age structure to understand some reasons for an apparent ageing of the census-farm operator population.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

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