Statistics by subject – Agriculture

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All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400113006
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111913
    Description:

    Farmers and corn breeders have developed multiple varieties suited to particular uses and adapted to distinct environments. In Canada, three broad types of corn dominate farmers' fields: corn for grain, corn for silage, and sweet corn.

    Release date: 2014-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010646
    Description:

    Food is as much a necessity as the air we breathe and the water we drink. But do we know where our food comes from, and what it takes to get it into our kitchens? The question of where our food is grown or processed is coming under increased scrutiny, not just in Canada but in other countries, including our trading partners. Concerns underlying this increased focus include discussions of energy consumption required for food transport, environmental concerns, product safety, food security and food costs. The article, Fork in the Road, takes a look at the trade in food and shows how Canadians can find out what foods are being produced in their local area.

    Release date: 2008-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010369
    Description:

    Until the mid-1970s, soybeans were restricted by climate primarily to southern Ontario. Intensive breeding programs have since opened up more widespread growing possibilities for this incredibly versatile crop in Canada: The 1.2 million hectares of soybeans reported on the Census of Agriculture in 2006 marked a near eightfold increase in area since 1976, the year the ground-breaking varieties that perform well in Canada's shorter growing season were introduced.

    Release date: 2007-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X20010006959
    Description:

    Milking time is no longer as simple as approaching a cow with a bucket and three-legged stool - it hasn't been so for a long time. Dairy farming has become a complex process requiring skills in business, herd management and dairy nutrition to name a few. All of this is often accomplished with only one or two people managing the farm. Technology is what helps one or two people manage dozens or hundreds of highly productive dairy cattle. It is used in all aspects of milk production, from computer-generated algorithms for designing feeding programs to laboratory testing for determining the digestibility of feed ingredients, to computer chips and databases that track milk production.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036478
    Description:

    Total income of farm families is derived from 1999 personal income tax returns of family members. The estimates refer to the income of families involved in a single unincorporated farm, showing a gross operating revenue of $10,000 and over. Families are defined as husband and wife, legal or common-law, with or without children at home; or lone parent, of any marital status, with at least one child living at home. There is no restriction on the age of the children. Children must report a marital status other than "married" or "living common-law" and have no child living in the household. In 1999, these families operated 150,500 farms, accounting for 76.5% of the total number of unincorporated farms (single operations) reporting a gross revenue of $10,000 and over.

    Net farm operating income refers to the profit (or loss) from performance of farm operations based on total operating revenues, including all program payments, less total operating expenses, before deducting depreciation.

    In 1998, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) developed a farm typology, which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than classification based on size, contribution to total agricultural production, or national net farm operating income. Factors such as age, income, business intentions and revenue class have been used to categorize farm operators and farm families into distinct groups. A description of the farm types is presented at the end of this article.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

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  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400113006
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111913
    Description:

    Farmers and corn breeders have developed multiple varieties suited to particular uses and adapted to distinct environments. In Canada, three broad types of corn dominate farmers' fields: corn for grain, corn for silage, and sweet corn.

    Release date: 2014-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010646
    Description:

    Food is as much a necessity as the air we breathe and the water we drink. But do we know where our food comes from, and what it takes to get it into our kitchens? The question of where our food is grown or processed is coming under increased scrutiny, not just in Canada but in other countries, including our trading partners. Concerns underlying this increased focus include discussions of energy consumption required for food transport, environmental concerns, product safety, food security and food costs. The article, Fork in the Road, takes a look at the trade in food and shows how Canadians can find out what foods are being produced in their local area.

    Release date: 2008-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010369
    Description:

    Until the mid-1970s, soybeans were restricted by climate primarily to southern Ontario. Intensive breeding programs have since opened up more widespread growing possibilities for this incredibly versatile crop in Canada: The 1.2 million hectares of soybeans reported on the Census of Agriculture in 2006 marked a near eightfold increase in area since 1976, the year the ground-breaking varieties that perform well in Canada's shorter growing season were introduced.

    Release date: 2007-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X20010006959
    Description:

    Milking time is no longer as simple as approaching a cow with a bucket and three-legged stool - it hasn't been so for a long time. Dairy farming has become a complex process requiring skills in business, herd management and dairy nutrition to name a few. All of this is often accomplished with only one or two people managing the farm. Technology is what helps one or two people manage dozens or hundreds of highly productive dairy cattle. It is used in all aspects of milk production, from computer-generated algorithms for designing feeding programs to laboratory testing for determining the digestibility of feed ingredients, to computer chips and databases that track milk production.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030036478
    Description:

    Total income of farm families is derived from 1999 personal income tax returns of family members. The estimates refer to the income of families involved in a single unincorporated farm, showing a gross operating revenue of $10,000 and over. Families are defined as husband and wife, legal or common-law, with or without children at home; or lone parent, of any marital status, with at least one child living at home. There is no restriction on the age of the children. Children must report a marital status other than "married" or "living common-law" and have no child living in the household. In 1999, these families operated 150,500 farms, accounting for 76.5% of the total number of unincorporated farms (single operations) reporting a gross revenue of $10,000 and over.

    Net farm operating income refers to the profit (or loss) from performance of farm operations based on total operating revenues, including all program payments, less total operating expenses, before deducting depreciation.

    In 1998, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) developed a farm typology, which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than classification based on size, contribution to total agricultural production, or national net farm operating income. Factors such as age, income, business intentions and revenue class have been used to categorize farm operators and farm families into distinct groups. A description of the farm types is presented at the end of this article.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

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