Statistics by subject – Agriculture

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All (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900310927
    Description:

    Water is essential for crop production, whether it is provided by rain or irrigation. Although relatively few farms in Canada irrigate, this use of water can represent a significant portion of water use in some areas of the country. This article presents information on the use of irrigation in 2007.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050027822
    Description:

    This paper will be a descriptive analysis of the organic fruit and vegetable data collected between 2000 and 2003.

    Release date: 2005-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050017785
    Description:

    This article analyzes the phenomenal growth in Canadian greenhouse operations, focusing on tomatoes because they are the most significant vegetable crop, both in terms of volume and value. It also looks at trade disputes with the United States as well as the impact of exchange rates on the greenhouse vegetable sales.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20040036797
    Description:

    In general, organic food in supermarkets tends to cost more compared with the same food grown in a non-organic fashion. Consumers may believe, as a result, that producers of organic food must be receiving more for their product than do their non-organic farming counterparts.

    Thus, the question begs to be asked: Are organic farmers able to charge more for their produce than non-organic producers? In other words, do organic producers receive a price premium? This is difficult to answer, as there is limited information on prices that farmers receive directly for their produce.

    Release date: 2004-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200210913029
    Description:

    Increasing numbers of consumers have come to believe in the perceived value and quality available in organic foods. Nevertheless, organic farming still occupies only a small niche in Canada's agricultural sector.

    Located mainly in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, the organic fruit and vegetable industry is not showing any particular signs of increased producer participation. Still, supermarkets across the country are setting aside ever-larger portions of their produce sections for organic produce, and natural food stores are expanding rapidly. Obviously, there is a niche market driven by consumers concerned with maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

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Analysis (5)

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  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900310927
    Description:

    Water is essential for crop production, whether it is provided by rain or irrigation. Although relatively few farms in Canada irrigate, this use of water can represent a significant portion of water use in some areas of the country. This article presents information on the use of irrigation in 2007.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050027822
    Description:

    This paper will be a descriptive analysis of the organic fruit and vegetable data collected between 2000 and 2003.

    Release date: 2005-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050017785
    Description:

    This article analyzes the phenomenal growth in Canadian greenhouse operations, focusing on tomatoes because they are the most significant vegetable crop, both in terms of volume and value. It also looks at trade disputes with the United States as well as the impact of exchange rates on the greenhouse vegetable sales.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20040036797
    Description:

    In general, organic food in supermarkets tends to cost more compared with the same food grown in a non-organic fashion. Consumers may believe, as a result, that producers of organic food must be receiving more for their product than do their non-organic farming counterparts.

    Thus, the question begs to be asked: Are organic farmers able to charge more for their produce than non-organic producers? In other words, do organic producers receive a price premium? This is difficult to answer, as there is limited information on prices that farmers receive directly for their produce.

    Release date: 2004-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200210913029
    Description:

    Increasing numbers of consumers have come to believe in the perceived value and quality available in organic foods. Nevertheless, organic farming still occupies only a small niche in Canada's agricultural sector.

    Located mainly in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, the organic fruit and vegetable industry is not showing any particular signs of increased producer participation. Still, supermarkets across the country are setting aside ever-larger portions of their produce sections for organic produce, and natural food stores are expanding rapidly. Obviously, there is a niche market driven by consumers concerned with maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

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