Statistics by subject – Agriculture

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  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094725
    Description:

    The development of aquaculture parallels the transition that occured in agriculture several thousand years ago. Agriculture appeared when hunters and gatherers began to raise livestock and plant crops to produce food. The parallel transition with aquatic species is becoming an important activity in the Canadian economy. As a result of new initiatives, Statistics Canada is now able to provide economic data for the developing industry of aquaculture.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094726
    Description:

    The agriculture industry in Canada was built largely by immigrants. They arrived, mostly from Europe and Asia, as land grant settlers and homesteaders or as indentured or hired labour. Times have changed. Ninety percent of foreign born Canadians now live in the 15 largest cities. While many recent immigrants still work in agriculture, increasingly they are entrepreneurs who are managing businesses of significant size.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111309
    Description:

    The statistics of agriculture presented here are in five sections. Series Ml-248 are the general statistics of the industry, covering such topics as farm population, area of farms, capital employed, cash income and prices of farm products. Series M249-309 are crop statistics, showing acreage, production and value of the various crops. Series M310-412 are livestock statistics, showing number and value of livestock on farms as well as production and disposition of various livestock products. Series M413-489 show exports and domestic disappearance of grains, animals and animal products, and food produced and consumed, per capita. Series M490-525 are miscellaneous statistics such as sales through marketing boards and purchases through co-operatives and farm implement and fertilizer sales.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 93F0038X
    Description:

    The three tables for Canada and each province present key variables from the 1996 Census of Agriculture-Population Linkage Base and where possible, comparisons to 1991 data. The key variables include summary data on age, marital status, mother tongue, highest level of schooling, income profiles for Census farm families and farm population counts.

    Release date: 1999-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034498
    Description:

    Canadian farmers are successfully meeting the demand for fresh fruit and vegetables during the local growing season. Due to the short duration of the growing season however, imports are required to fill the shelves for a significant part of the year. Although overall prices for fresh produce are trending downwards, these imports cost more in the grocery stores and fresh markets than domestic produce.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034497
    Description:

    The 1996 Census of Agriculture reported the highest share of census-farm operators over 60 years of age in Canadian history. The share has been increasing since 1981. Are farmers a dying phenomenon? Are there any young farmers? The purpose of this article is to review the census-farm operator age structure to understand some reasons for an apparent ageing of the census-farm operator population.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

  • Table: 93F0033X
    Description:

    A one-page table for Canada and a one-page table for each of the provinces provide 1996 and 1991 comparisons for some key variables.

    Release date: 1999-02-04

  • Table: 93F0035X
    Description:

    Tables for Canada and each province present key variables and where possible comparisons to the 1991 Census of Agriculture. The key variables include summary data on age, sex, residence status, average weekly farm work hours, average weekly non-farm work hours, operation of non-agricultural businesses and injuries. A two-page table for Canada and a two-page table for each of the provinces provides 1991 and 1996 comparisons for some key variables.

    Release date: 1999-02-04

Data (4)

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Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094725
    Description:

    The development of aquaculture parallels the transition that occured in agriculture several thousand years ago. Agriculture appeared when hunters and gatherers began to raise livestock and plant crops to produce food. The parallel transition with aquatic species is becoming an important activity in the Canadian economy. As a result of new initiatives, Statistics Canada is now able to provide economic data for the developing industry of aquaculture.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094726
    Description:

    The agriculture industry in Canada was built largely by immigrants. They arrived, mostly from Europe and Asia, as land grant settlers and homesteaders or as indentured or hired labour. Times have changed. Ninety percent of foreign born Canadians now live in the 15 largest cities. While many recent immigrants still work in agriculture, increasingly they are entrepreneurs who are managing businesses of significant size.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034498
    Description:

    Canadian farmers are successfully meeting the demand for fresh fruit and vegetables during the local growing season. Due to the short duration of the growing season however, imports are required to fill the shelves for a significant part of the year. Although overall prices for fresh produce are trending downwards, these imports cost more in the grocery stores and fresh markets than domestic produce.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990034497
    Description:

    The 1996 Census of Agriculture reported the highest share of census-farm operators over 60 years of age in Canadian history. The share has been increasing since 1981. Are farmers a dying phenomenon? Are there any young farmers? The purpose of this article is to review the census-farm operator age structure to understand some reasons for an apparent ageing of the census-farm operator population.

    Release date: 1999-03-17

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