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All (17)

All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015048
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the capital expenditure estimates for 2014 and the expenditure intentions for 2015, released by Statistics Canada on July 6th 2015. The article examines changes in the pace and composition of non-residential capital spending, highlighting key movements in the data for these reference years.

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013022
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on the composition of capital expenditures in Canada. It highlights major changes in the distribution of aggregate capital spending over the last decade, as investments in structural assets accelerated in resource-based regions. The article also discusses the new preliminary actual estimates for 2012 and the investment intentions for 2013. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2010086
    Description:

    This study examines changes in housing market prices in Canada in 2009 using the New Housing Price Index, home resale prices, number of resale units, and data on the number of new units approved by municipalities. It highlights changes in housing market prices from 2005 to 2009 in the provinces and major cities.

    Release date: 2010-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009081
    Description:

    This study provides a first look at recent trends in the average age of education buildings in Canada and the provinces. It compares the average age with the useful life of education buildings at the elementary-secondary, college and university levels.

    Release date: 2009-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008072
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2008-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008050
    Description:

    This paper examines whether or not the long-term government bond rate could reasonably be employed as the rate of return on public capital when calculating public sector gross domestic product. It finds that the rate of return on public capital is lower than often reported and is roughly consistent with the rate of return on private capital. Given that there is a range of estimates that are plausible, the paper concludes that the long-run government bond rate could be used as a conservative estimate for the rate of return for public infrastructure.

    Previous studies have shown that production function estimates tend to find rates of return that are implausibly large, while cost function estimates appear more reasonable. This paper shows that public capital and total factor productivity (TFP) growth behave similarly, and argues that production function estimates for the impact of public capital overstate its impact as a result, catching part of what belongs in estimates of TFP. It also shows that the similarity between the growth in public capital and TFP leads to a large confidence interval around public capital elasticity estimates derived from the production function framework. The paper then proceeds by generating a confidence interval from the production function estimated first with and then without TFP growth. It then uses a cost function to pinpoint more precisely estimates for the marginal cost savings from public capital. Importantly, the estimate derived from the cost function is found in the lower part of the confidence interval derived from the production function. The rate of return associated with the overlapping estimates is then shown to cover a range that extends from the average long-run government bond rate to the rate of return on private capital.

    Release date: 2008-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007056
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2006. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006043
    Description:

    This report highlights investment in non-residential construction in 2005, focusing on commercial, institutional and industrial components. This study also looks at the regional and provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2006-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006035
    Description:

    This study looks at the average age of the four main components of public infrastructure in Canada: roads and highways, sewer systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and bridges. This study covers the 1963 to 2003 period for the three levels of government.

    Release date: 2006-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050108758
    Description:

    The current boom in housing reflects not just low interest rates, but also a number of factors such as population changes, migration and household formation. These will continue to support housing even if interest rates rise.

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050098623
    Description:

    Cycles in business investment are a key determinant of overall growth, as they are longer-lasting and stronger than in other sectors. Canada is currently in the early stages of an upturn in investment, driven by the revival of the resource sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2001015
    Description:

    The Canadian Consumer Price Index (CPI) applies a version of the user cost approach to measure the cost of home ownership. Because this approach specifically estimates the costs of using owned accommodation and not those faced by tenants, the measure includes a "replacement cost" (or depreciation) component. Depreciation is the only component in the CPI that is not an out-of-pocket expense. Consequently, economists face a unique set of methodological challenges when measuring depreciation.

    Between 1949 and 1997, the annual housing depreciation rate used in the CPI was 2%. Statistics Canada adopted the rate from a study that analysed U.S. Federal Housing Administration field appraisal data from 1939.

    This study argues that there is evidence that the 2% depreciation rate is too high to continue to use in the future. Consider that: 1) other Canadian studies show an upper bound of 1.7%, with a median estimate of 1.5%; 2) other statistical agencies use lower rates; and 3) every academic study over the past 40 years has arrived at a lower rate. As a consequence of this study and the existing supporting evidence, the depreciation rate in the Canadian CPI was lowered to 1.5% effective January 1998.

    Release date: 2001-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018513
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Capitalization of software.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015048
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the capital expenditure estimates for 2014 and the expenditure intentions for 2015, released by Statistics Canada on July 6th 2015. The article examines changes in the pace and composition of non-residential capital spending, highlighting key movements in the data for these reference years.

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013022
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on the composition of capital expenditures in Canada. It highlights major changes in the distribution of aggregate capital spending over the last decade, as investments in structural assets accelerated in resource-based regions. The article also discusses the new preliminary actual estimates for 2012 and the investment intentions for 2013. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2010086
    Description:

    This study examines changes in housing market prices in Canada in 2009 using the New Housing Price Index, home resale prices, number of resale units, and data on the number of new units approved by municipalities. It highlights changes in housing market prices from 2005 to 2009 in the provinces and major cities.

    Release date: 2010-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009081
    Description:

    This study provides a first look at recent trends in the average age of education buildings in Canada and the provinces. It compares the average age with the useful life of education buildings at the elementary-secondary, college and university levels.

    Release date: 2009-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008072
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2008-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008050
    Description:

    This paper examines whether or not the long-term government bond rate could reasonably be employed as the rate of return on public capital when calculating public sector gross domestic product. It finds that the rate of return on public capital is lower than often reported and is roughly consistent with the rate of return on private capital. Given that there is a range of estimates that are plausible, the paper concludes that the long-run government bond rate could be used as a conservative estimate for the rate of return for public infrastructure.

    Previous studies have shown that production function estimates tend to find rates of return that are implausibly large, while cost function estimates appear more reasonable. This paper shows that public capital and total factor productivity (TFP) growth behave similarly, and argues that production function estimates for the impact of public capital overstate its impact as a result, catching part of what belongs in estimates of TFP. It also shows that the similarity between the growth in public capital and TFP leads to a large confidence interval around public capital elasticity estimates derived from the production function framework. The paper then proceeds by generating a confidence interval from the production function estimated first with and then without TFP growth. It then uses a cost function to pinpoint more precisely estimates for the marginal cost savings from public capital. Importantly, the estimate derived from the cost function is found in the lower part of the confidence interval derived from the production function. The rate of return associated with the overlapping estimates is then shown to cover a range that extends from the average long-run government bond rate to the rate of return on private capital.

    Release date: 2008-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007056
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2006. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006043
    Description:

    This report highlights investment in non-residential construction in 2005, focusing on commercial, institutional and industrial components. This study also looks at the regional and provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2006-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006035
    Description:

    This study looks at the average age of the four main components of public infrastructure in Canada: roads and highways, sewer systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and bridges. This study covers the 1963 to 2003 period for the three levels of government.

    Release date: 2006-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050108758
    Description:

    The current boom in housing reflects not just low interest rates, but also a number of factors such as population changes, migration and household formation. These will continue to support housing even if interest rates rise.

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050098623
    Description:

    Cycles in business investment are a key determinant of overall growth, as they are longer-lasting and stronger than in other sectors. Canada is currently in the early stages of an upturn in investment, driven by the revival of the resource sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2001015
    Description:

    The Canadian Consumer Price Index (CPI) applies a version of the user cost approach to measure the cost of home ownership. Because this approach specifically estimates the costs of using owned accommodation and not those faced by tenants, the measure includes a "replacement cost" (or depreciation) component. Depreciation is the only component in the CPI that is not an out-of-pocket expense. Consequently, economists face a unique set of methodological challenges when measuring depreciation.

    Between 1949 and 1997, the annual housing depreciation rate used in the CPI was 2%. Statistics Canada adopted the rate from a study that analysed U.S. Federal Housing Administration field appraisal data from 1939.

    This study argues that there is evidence that the 2% depreciation rate is too high to continue to use in the future. Consider that: 1) other Canadian studies show an upper bound of 1.7%, with a median estimate of 1.5%; 2) other statistical agencies use lower rates; and 3) every academic study over the past 40 years has arrived at a lower rate. As a consequence of this study and the existing supporting evidence, the depreciation rate in the Canadian CPI was lowered to 1.5% effective January 1998.

    Release date: 2001-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018513
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Capitalization of software.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

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