Statistics by subject – Construction

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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008072
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2008-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008050
    Description:

    This paper examines whether or not the long-term government bond rate could reasonably be employed as the rate of return on public capital when calculating public sector gross domestic product. It finds that the rate of return on public capital is lower than often reported and is roughly consistent with the rate of return on private capital. Given that there is a range of estimates that are plausible, the paper concludes that the long-run government bond rate could be used as a conservative estimate for the rate of return for public infrastructure.

    Previous studies have shown that production function estimates tend to find rates of return that are implausibly large, while cost function estimates appear more reasonable. This paper shows that public capital and total factor productivity (TFP) growth behave similarly, and argues that production function estimates for the impact of public capital overstate its impact as a result, catching part of what belongs in estimates of TFP. It also shows that the similarity between the growth in public capital and TFP leads to a large confidence interval around public capital elasticity estimates derived from the production function framework. The paper then proceeds by generating a confidence interval from the production function estimated first with and then without TFP growth. It then uses a cost function to pinpoint more precisely estimates for the marginal cost savings from public capital. Importantly, the estimate derived from the cost function is found in the lower part of the confidence interval derived from the production function. The rate of return associated with the overlapping estimates is then shown to cover a range that extends from the average long-run government bond rate to the rate of return on private capital.

    Release date: 2008-04-15

  • Table: 97-561-X2006002
    Description:

    These data tables present 2006 Census highlights on mode of transportation, place of work and commuting distance to work.The first series of tables presents data on the mode of transportation of the employed labour force by age groups and sex for places of residence or work. The second series of tables presents data on the place of work of the employed labour force for the places of residence or work. The third series of tables presents data on commuting distance and period of construction for places of residence. Also displayed in Table 3 is the median commuting distance.

    Available approximately one month after the official day of release, they present information highlights via key indicators such as 2006 counts, percentage change (1996 to 2006, 2001 to 2006) and percent distribution (2006, 2001, 1996) for various levels of geography. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2008-04-02

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) (3 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008072
    Description:

    Using data from the monthly Wholesale Trade Survey this study examines the sales for the year 2007. This annual review describes the evolution of sales by different sectors such as machinery and electronic equipment, personal and household goods and automotive products. This study also includes a provincial dimension.

    Release date: 2008-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008050
    Description:

    This paper examines whether or not the long-term government bond rate could reasonably be employed as the rate of return on public capital when calculating public sector gross domestic product. It finds that the rate of return on public capital is lower than often reported and is roughly consistent with the rate of return on private capital. Given that there is a range of estimates that are plausible, the paper concludes that the long-run government bond rate could be used as a conservative estimate for the rate of return for public infrastructure.

    Previous studies have shown that production function estimates tend to find rates of return that are implausibly large, while cost function estimates appear more reasonable. This paper shows that public capital and total factor productivity (TFP) growth behave similarly, and argues that production function estimates for the impact of public capital overstate its impact as a result, catching part of what belongs in estimates of TFP. It also shows that the similarity between the growth in public capital and TFP leads to a large confidence interval around public capital elasticity estimates derived from the production function framework. The paper then proceeds by generating a confidence interval from the production function estimated first with and then without TFP growth. It then uses a cost function to pinpoint more precisely estimates for the marginal cost savings from public capital. Importantly, the estimate derived from the cost function is found in the lower part of the confidence interval derived from the production function. The rate of return associated with the overlapping estimates is then shown to cover a range that extends from the average long-run government bond rate to the rate of return on private capital.

    Release date: 2008-04-15

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