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All (27)

All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0009X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) used the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw the initial sample of approximately 20,000 households starting in 1994 and for the sample top-up this third cycle. The survey is conducted every two years. The sample collection is distributed over four quarterly periods followed by a follow-up period and the whole process takes a year. In each household, some limited health information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The survey is designed to collect information on the health of the Canadian population and related socio-demographic information. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and continues every second year thereafter. The survey is designed to produce both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. The questionnaires includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health, a health index, chronic conditions and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other mediciations. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use and physical activity. A special focus content for this cycle includes family medical history with questions about certain chronic conditions among immediate family members and when they were acquired. As well, a section on self care has also been included this cycle. The socio-demographic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035387
    Description:

    This article looks briefly at changes in health in the 20th century, with special focus on the concerns of Canadians in childhood, mid-life and old age.

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015299
    Description:

    This article examines trends in teenage pregnancy in Canada, focussing on induced abortions, live births and fetal loss among women aged 15 to 19 in 1997.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015301
    Description:

    This article examines associations between selected work- and non-work-related factors and the incidence of chronic back problems over the next two years.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015300
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of proxy reporting in the Natiional Population Health (NPHS). It also explores associations between proxy reporting status and the prevalence of selected health problems, and investigates the relationship between changes in proxy reporting status and two-year incidence of health problems.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015302
    Description:

    This article examines changes in household spending on health care between 1978 and 1998. It also provides a detailed look at household spending on health care in 1998.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025167
    Description:

    This article uses the measure of dependence-free life expectancy to ask whether the additional years of life gained over the last century are being lived in good health.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Table: 84-546-X
    Description:

    This CD-ROM is the first Canada-wide publication of occupational mortality risks produced in Canada. A previous publication for the province of British Columbia (Occupational mortality in British Columbia 1950-1978) was published in 1986 as Statistics Canada catalogue no. 84-544 (ISBN 0-660-59382-32872-X).

    This new publication helps identify occupational groups across Canada with excessive mortality due to specific causes. It also provides a Canadian monitoring system to detect previously unsuspected associations between, for example, cancer and occupation and provide a powerful tool for both generating and testing hypotheses.

    The publication gives the results of a longitudinal follow-up of the 10% Canadian Occupational Cohort, a sample of 700,000 individuals, both women and men, in the Canadian workforce during the period 1965-71, linked to the Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB) for 1965-1991.

    This publication is likely to be of interest to the medical and research community, workers' compensation and safety boards, ministries of health and labour, regulatory agencies and the general public.

    Release date: 2000-09-07

  • Public use microdata: 82M0010X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) program is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994. The institutional component includes long-term residents (expected to stay longer than six months) in health care facilities with four or more beds in Canada with the principal exclusion of the Yukon and the Northwest Teritories. The document has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the 1996-1997 microdata file containing survey results. The main variables include: demography, health status, chronic conditions, restriction of activity, socio-demographic, and others.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 82M0018S
    Description:

    Health Canada sponsored a content buy-in to the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) 1994-95. The buy-in was collected as a supplementary survey for selected persons aged 12 years and older who are part of the core NPHS sample. The supplements are not collected for the sample buy-ins, which were done in some provinces, and they are not collected for the Yukon and Northwest Territories.

    The information was collected quarterly, as a component of the NPHS Computer-Assisted Interviewing application. The NPHS supplements cover a variety of topics, including nutrition, smoking, injury prevention and safety, breast-feeding, consumption of alcohol and other drugs during pregnancy, sexual health and health care services.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 89M0007X
    Description:

    Information in this microdata file refers to survey data collected in September - November, 1994 for persons 15 years of age and older in Canada's ten provinces. The survey's main data objectives were to measure the prevalence and patterns of alcohol and other drug use, to assess harm and other consequences of drug use and to evaluate trends in recent patterns of use. Canada's Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (CADS) also updates and expands upon data collected in the first survey, the National Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (NADS), conducted in 1989.

    Release date: 2000-07-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045065
    Description:

    Oral contraceptive users - many of whom smoke heavily - tend to be young, unmarried, sexually active women who are relatively well-educated and who have prescription drug insurance coverage.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045066
    Description:

    Entry into home care was related to an increase in perceived emotional support and a transition to living alone, even when several demographic and health factors were taken into account.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045067
    Description:

    Although health status is strongly associated with residence in a long-term health care facility, the absence of a spouse, low income, low education, and advanced age are also important factors.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045064
    Description:

    Lower mortality rates overall, and for cardiovascular disease in particular, as well as lower odds of heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and activity limitation, suggest that recent cohorts are healthier than previous cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X1999003
    Description:

    The Winter 1999 issue of Health reports is a special issue on the theme, How healthy are Canadians? It contains articles on: life expectancy; children's health status; health in mid-life; health among older adults; pychological health and depression; income inequality and mortality among working-age people in Canada and the United States; personal health practices, specifically smoking, drinking, physical activity and weight; and recent trends in health care services.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034933
    Description:

    Most Canadians enjoy good health in the middle years, although, not surprisingly, health declines with age.

    The prevalence of several chronic conditions and activity limitations due to a health problem has declined for those aged 45 to 64 over the past 20 years. At the same time, the prevalence of asthma and migraine headaches has increased for women aged 45 to 64; diabetes and asthma have increased among men in the same age group.

    Lower levels of education and income are associated with an increased likelihood of a decline in health and with chronic illness.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034932
    Description:

    The 20th century saw a dramatic decline in infant mortality in Canada and an accompanying decline in regional disparities in infant mortality.

    Income-related differences in infant mortality diminished substantially; however, by 1996, rates in the poorest neighbourhoods were still two-thirds higher than those in the richest neighbourhoods.

    Infant mortality in Canada's poorest neighbourhoods is now significantly lower than the national rate for the United States. However, it is less impressive than what has been attained in parts of Europe, such as France and Sweden. The infant mortality rate in Canada's richest neighbourhoods is currently only about as low as the national rate for Sweden.

    In recent years in Canada, income-related disparities in infant mortality have ceased to diminish, although regional disparities have continued to decline.

    Since 1971, Canada has seen dramatic reductions in child mortality due to most external causes of death (accidents, poisoning and violence). Nevertheless, there has been an increase in suicides among children.

    Most children in Canada are in very good health. However, socioeconomic differences are evident from an early age. The children of parents with a low level of education are more likely to have poorer perceived health and are less likely to enjoy unbroken good health.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034935
    Description:

    Depression is twice as prevalent in women as in men. Depression is much more common among younger women than older women.

    Depression is a chronic disease - one episode is highly predictive of future episodes.

    Social support may be a protective factor. Women who lacked emotional support had higher odds of a future depressive episode compared with women with emotional support.

    There is a strong association between smoking and depression, but the research evidence concerning the underlying reason is complex.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034937
    Description:

    The proportion of young adults aged 20 to 24 who are at least moderately physically active in their leisure time increased from 1994/95 to 1998/99.

    The prevalence of smoking among teen girls aged 15 to 19 is higher than among teenage boys.

    Heavier drinking (at least five alcoholic drinks per occasion) increased among both males and females from 1994/95 to1998/99. Fully 45% of males aged 20 to 24 did so at least monthly in 1998/99.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034931
    Description:

    Life expectancy in Canada is excellent -among the highest in the world.

    Over 90% of Canada's 136 health regions, containing about 99% of the total population, have life expectancy values within 2.8 years of the overall Canada value.

    The health regions with the lowest life expectancies tend to be in remote regions or northern parts of certain provinces and have significant Aboriginal populations. The lower life expectancies are not associated with any one specific cause; rather, the mortality rates in these regions are higher for most causes of death.

    Mortality patterns are similar for men and women in the low life expectancy health regions.

    Most health regions with higher life expectancy are in and west of Ontario. Mortality rates are generally at least 10% lower for all causes than the Canadian average.

    Consistent with other measures of the health of the population, there is an association with socioeconomic factors: life expectancy increases as the rate of unemployment decreases and the level of education increases.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034938
    Description:

    In 1998/99, Canadians with low incomes were more likely than those with higher incomes to be heavy users of physician services, to visit emergency departments, to be admitted to hospital, to take multiple medications, and to require home care services.

    Despite an increase in coverage in most provinces for prescription drug and dental insurance, significant differences in use of these services remain. Youth, older adults and Canadians with low incomes are less likely to have insurance coverage for dental care and prescription drugs.

    The percentage of Canadians who said they had health care needs that were not met increased from 4% in 1994/95 (1.1 million people) to 6% in 1998/99 (1.5 million people).

    The likelihood of going to hospital increases with age. It also increases with having a lower income, having less than a secondary level of education, believing oneself to be in poor health, and being a smoker, physically inactive, and overweight.

    The risk of hospitalization is similar for both female smokers and male smokers. This represents an important change from past studies, which showed smaller relative risks of hospitalization for female smokers than for male smokers.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034934
    Description:

    Our improving life expectancy in Canada does not necessarily mean more years in poor health. Older adults can expect an improved quality as well as an extended quantity of life compared with 20 years ago.

    Aging does not necessarily result in a continuous decline in health. Close to half of older Canadians who reported fair or poor health in 1994/95 reported an improvement in their health in 1998/99.

    The rate of institutionalization for Canadians aged 65 or older declined from 16% in 1981 to 14% in 1996, even with increases in life expectancy.

    The rate of activity limitation among adults aged 65 to 74 who live at home has declined since 1978; among adults aged 75 or older who live at home, the rate has not changed since 1978.

    The socioeconomic trends observed in younger age groups continue among older adults, although less so. Seniors who did not graduate from high school have increased odds of dying; those with low incomes have increased odds of institutionalization.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014890
    Description:

    Workers who are spending longer hours on the job may be putting certain aspects of their health at risk. For some of these people, changing to a substantially longer work week may increase the chances of weight gain, smoking or alcohol consumption. (Adapted from an article in the Autumn 1999 issue of Health Reports.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015646
    Description:

    The current economic context obliges all partners of health-care systems, whether public or private, to identify those factors that determine the use of health-care services. To increase our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have established a new database. For a representative sample of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional micro-data on the level of health of individuals and on their socioeconomic characteristics, and detailed longitudinal data on the use of health-care services have been linked. In this presentation, we will discuss the general context of the linkage of records from various organizations, the protection of privacy and confidentiality. We will also present results of studies which should not have been performed in the absence of the linked database.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0009X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) used the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw the initial sample of approximately 20,000 households starting in 1994 and for the sample top-up this third cycle. The survey is conducted every two years. The sample collection is distributed over four quarterly periods followed by a follow-up period and the whole process takes a year. In each household, some limited health information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The survey is designed to collect information on the health of the Canadian population and related socio-demographic information. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and continues every second year thereafter. The survey is designed to produce both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. The questionnaires includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health, a health index, chronic conditions and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other mediciations. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use and physical activity. A special focus content for this cycle includes family medical history with questions about certain chronic conditions among immediate family members and when they were acquired. As well, a section on self care has also been included this cycle. The socio-demographic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Table: 84-546-X
    Description:

    This CD-ROM is the first Canada-wide publication of occupational mortality risks produced in Canada. A previous publication for the province of British Columbia (Occupational mortality in British Columbia 1950-1978) was published in 1986 as Statistics Canada catalogue no. 84-544 (ISBN 0-660-59382-32872-X).

    This new publication helps identify occupational groups across Canada with excessive mortality due to specific causes. It also provides a Canadian monitoring system to detect previously unsuspected associations between, for example, cancer and occupation and provide a powerful tool for both generating and testing hypotheses.

    The publication gives the results of a longitudinal follow-up of the 10% Canadian Occupational Cohort, a sample of 700,000 individuals, both women and men, in the Canadian workforce during the period 1965-71, linked to the Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB) for 1965-1991.

    This publication is likely to be of interest to the medical and research community, workers' compensation and safety boards, ministries of health and labour, regulatory agencies and the general public.

    Release date: 2000-09-07

  • Public use microdata: 82M0010X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) program is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994. The institutional component includes long-term residents (expected to stay longer than six months) in health care facilities with four or more beds in Canada with the principal exclusion of the Yukon and the Northwest Teritories. The document has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the 1996-1997 microdata file containing survey results. The main variables include: demography, health status, chronic conditions, restriction of activity, socio-demographic, and others.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 82M0018S
    Description:

    Health Canada sponsored a content buy-in to the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) 1994-95. The buy-in was collected as a supplementary survey for selected persons aged 12 years and older who are part of the core NPHS sample. The supplements are not collected for the sample buy-ins, which were done in some provinces, and they are not collected for the Yukon and Northwest Territories.

    The information was collected quarterly, as a component of the NPHS Computer-Assisted Interviewing application. The NPHS supplements cover a variety of topics, including nutrition, smoking, injury prevention and safety, breast-feeding, consumption of alcohol and other drugs during pregnancy, sexual health and health care services.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 89M0007X
    Description:

    Information in this microdata file refers to survey data collected in September - November, 1994 for persons 15 years of age and older in Canada's ten provinces. The survey's main data objectives were to measure the prevalence and patterns of alcohol and other drug use, to assess harm and other consequences of drug use and to evaluate trends in recent patterns of use. Canada's Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (CADS) also updates and expands upon data collected in the first survey, the National Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (NADS), conducted in 1989.

    Release date: 2000-07-07

Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035387
    Description:

    This article looks briefly at changes in health in the 20th century, with special focus on the concerns of Canadians in childhood, mid-life and old age.

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015299
    Description:

    This article examines trends in teenage pregnancy in Canada, focussing on induced abortions, live births and fetal loss among women aged 15 to 19 in 1997.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015301
    Description:

    This article examines associations between selected work- and non-work-related factors and the incidence of chronic back problems over the next two years.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015300
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of proxy reporting in the Natiional Population Health (NPHS). It also explores associations between proxy reporting status and the prevalence of selected health problems, and investigates the relationship between changes in proxy reporting status and two-year incidence of health problems.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015302
    Description:

    This article examines changes in household spending on health care between 1978 and 1998. It also provides a detailed look at household spending on health care in 1998.

    Release date: 2000-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025167
    Description:

    This article uses the measure of dependence-free life expectancy to ask whether the additional years of life gained over the last century are being lived in good health.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045065
    Description:

    Oral contraceptive users - many of whom smoke heavily - tend to be young, unmarried, sexually active women who are relatively well-educated and who have prescription drug insurance coverage.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045066
    Description:

    Entry into home care was related to an increase in perceived emotional support and a transition to living alone, even when several demographic and health factors were taken into account.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045067
    Description:

    Although health status is strongly associated with residence in a long-term health care facility, the absence of a spouse, low income, low education, and advanced age are also important factors.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045064
    Description:

    Lower mortality rates overall, and for cardiovascular disease in particular, as well as lower odds of heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and activity limitation, suggest that recent cohorts are healthier than previous cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X1999003
    Description:

    The Winter 1999 issue of Health reports is a special issue on the theme, How healthy are Canadians? It contains articles on: life expectancy; children's health status; health in mid-life; health among older adults; pychological health and depression; income inequality and mortality among working-age people in Canada and the United States; personal health practices, specifically smoking, drinking, physical activity and weight; and recent trends in health care services.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034933
    Description:

    Most Canadians enjoy good health in the middle years, although, not surprisingly, health declines with age.

    The prevalence of several chronic conditions and activity limitations due to a health problem has declined for those aged 45 to 64 over the past 20 years. At the same time, the prevalence of asthma and migraine headaches has increased for women aged 45 to 64; diabetes and asthma have increased among men in the same age group.

    Lower levels of education and income are associated with an increased likelihood of a decline in health and with chronic illness.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034932
    Description:

    The 20th century saw a dramatic decline in infant mortality in Canada and an accompanying decline in regional disparities in infant mortality.

    Income-related differences in infant mortality diminished substantially; however, by 1996, rates in the poorest neighbourhoods were still two-thirds higher than those in the richest neighbourhoods.

    Infant mortality in Canada's poorest neighbourhoods is now significantly lower than the national rate for the United States. However, it is less impressive than what has been attained in parts of Europe, such as France and Sweden. The infant mortality rate in Canada's richest neighbourhoods is currently only about as low as the national rate for Sweden.

    In recent years in Canada, income-related disparities in infant mortality have ceased to diminish, although regional disparities have continued to decline.

    Since 1971, Canada has seen dramatic reductions in child mortality due to most external causes of death (accidents, poisoning and violence). Nevertheless, there has been an increase in suicides among children.

    Most children in Canada are in very good health. However, socioeconomic differences are evident from an early age. The children of parents with a low level of education are more likely to have poorer perceived health and are less likely to enjoy unbroken good health.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034935
    Description:

    Depression is twice as prevalent in women as in men. Depression is much more common among younger women than older women.

    Depression is a chronic disease - one episode is highly predictive of future episodes.

    Social support may be a protective factor. Women who lacked emotional support had higher odds of a future depressive episode compared with women with emotional support.

    There is a strong association between smoking and depression, but the research evidence concerning the underlying reason is complex.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034937
    Description:

    The proportion of young adults aged 20 to 24 who are at least moderately physically active in their leisure time increased from 1994/95 to 1998/99.

    The prevalence of smoking among teen girls aged 15 to 19 is higher than among teenage boys.

    Heavier drinking (at least five alcoholic drinks per occasion) increased among both males and females from 1994/95 to1998/99. Fully 45% of males aged 20 to 24 did so at least monthly in 1998/99.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034931
    Description:

    Life expectancy in Canada is excellent -among the highest in the world.

    Over 90% of Canada's 136 health regions, containing about 99% of the total population, have life expectancy values within 2.8 years of the overall Canada value.

    The health regions with the lowest life expectancies tend to be in remote regions or northern parts of certain provinces and have significant Aboriginal populations. The lower life expectancies are not associated with any one specific cause; rather, the mortality rates in these regions are higher for most causes of death.

    Mortality patterns are similar for men and women in the low life expectancy health regions.

    Most health regions with higher life expectancy are in and west of Ontario. Mortality rates are generally at least 10% lower for all causes than the Canadian average.

    Consistent with other measures of the health of the population, there is an association with socioeconomic factors: life expectancy increases as the rate of unemployment decreases and the level of education increases.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034938
    Description:

    In 1998/99, Canadians with low incomes were more likely than those with higher incomes to be heavy users of physician services, to visit emergency departments, to be admitted to hospital, to take multiple medications, and to require home care services.

    Despite an increase in coverage in most provinces for prescription drug and dental insurance, significant differences in use of these services remain. Youth, older adults and Canadians with low incomes are less likely to have insurance coverage for dental care and prescription drugs.

    The percentage of Canadians who said they had health care needs that were not met increased from 4% in 1994/95 (1.1 million people) to 6% in 1998/99 (1.5 million people).

    The likelihood of going to hospital increases with age. It also increases with having a lower income, having less than a secondary level of education, believing oneself to be in poor health, and being a smoker, physically inactive, and overweight.

    The risk of hospitalization is similar for both female smokers and male smokers. This represents an important change from past studies, which showed smaller relative risks of hospitalization for female smokers than for male smokers.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034934
    Description:

    Our improving life expectancy in Canada does not necessarily mean more years in poor health. Older adults can expect an improved quality as well as an extended quantity of life compared with 20 years ago.

    Aging does not necessarily result in a continuous decline in health. Close to half of older Canadians who reported fair or poor health in 1994/95 reported an improvement in their health in 1998/99.

    The rate of institutionalization for Canadians aged 65 or older declined from 16% in 1981 to 14% in 1996, even with increases in life expectancy.

    The rate of activity limitation among adults aged 65 to 74 who live at home has declined since 1978; among adults aged 75 or older who live at home, the rate has not changed since 1978.

    The socioeconomic trends observed in younger age groups continue among older adults, although less so. Seniors who did not graduate from high school have increased odds of dying; those with low incomes have increased odds of institutionalization.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014890
    Description:

    Workers who are spending longer hours on the job may be putting certain aspects of their health at risk. For some of these people, changing to a substantially longer work week may increase the chances of weight gain, smoking or alcohol consumption. (Adapted from an article in the Autumn 1999 issue of Health Reports.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82F0077X1999001
    Release date: 2000-02-16

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015646
    Description:

    The current economic context obliges all partners of health-care systems, whether public or private, to identify those factors that determine the use of health-care services. To increase our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have established a new database. For a representative sample of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional micro-data on the level of health of individuals and on their socioeconomic characteristics, and detailed longitudinal data on the use of health-care services have been linked. In this presentation, we will discuss the general context of the linkage of records from various organizations, the protection of privacy and confidentiality. We will also present results of studies which should not have been performed in the absence of the linked database.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

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