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All (37)

All (37) (25 of 37 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113220
    Description:

    Commuting is, to a large extent, an urban phenomenon. Close to 80% of commuting takes place between municipalities within larger urban centres. But commuting patterns are becoming increasingly complex and rural commuting is more complex than commonly believed. For persons in rural and small-town areas, rural-to-rural commuting is as large as rural-to-urban commuting. Moreover, rural jobs are more than twice as reliant on in-commuting rural workers as they are on in-commuting urban workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613190
    Description:

    Past studies of illness-related work absences have focused on annual figures and have not differentiated between full- and part-week absences. But the two have quite different seasonal patterns and long-term trends.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613189
    Description:

    The strong growth of telework in the 1990s seems to have stalled since the turn of the century. Despite significant improvements in the infrastructure, the fall-off in telework popularity has been pervasive.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-001-X20070019644
    Description:

    The North American experience with international migration stands in unique contrast to much of the rest of the world. This paper uses microdata drawn from the national censuses of Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and applies the same methodological framework to these data to examine the impact of international migration on the labour market. We find a numerically comparable and statistically significant inverse relation between immigrant-induced shifts in labour supply and wages in each of the three countries: A 10% labour supply shift is associated with about a 3% to 4% opposite-signed change in wages. Despite the similarity in the wage elasticity, the impact of international migration on the wage structure differs significantly across countries. In Canada, international migration substantially narrowed wage inequality because immigrants in Canada tend to be disproportionately high-skilled. In the United States, international migration substantially increased wage inequality because immigrants in the United States tend to be disproportionately low-skilled. In Mexico, however, emigration rates are highest in the middle of the skill distribution and lowest at the extremes. As a result, international migration greatly increased relative wages in the middle of the Mexican skill distribution and lowered relative wages at the extremes. Paradoxically, the large-scale migration of workers from Mexico may have slightly reduced the relative wage of the low-skill workers remaining in that country.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813170
    Description:

    Improvements during the 1980s and 1990s in Canada's strike and lockout statistics appear to have stalled somewhat in recent years. The drop in time lost to industrial disputes at the beginning of the decade was offset by increases in 2004 and 2005. It is too early to say if this is the beginning of a new trend. What can be done, however, is to gain an understanding of recent stoppages by looking at the main areas of dispute, the jurisdictions in which the stoppages occurred, and how they were resolved.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513163
    Description:

    Finding the right person for the job is the goal of every hiring decision. In most cases, a personal interview combined with a skill-specific test will be enough for both parties to see if they are compatible. However, for dangerous jobs or where public safety or security is at stake, more stringent requirements need to be met. Medical examinations, security checks, and drugs tests are three screening techniques employers use.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510813148
    Description:

    Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410813125
    Description:

    This article discusses recent trends in the union movement, including numbers of members, the proportion of women, the transition from goods-producing to service industries, the shift in share from private- to public-sector unions, and in-roads among part-time workers and in smaller workplaces.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046806
    Description:

    This article examines the entry of women into the paid labour force, their continued concentration in certain kinds of employment and the increasing tendency for men to do the kinds of jobs traditionally performed by women.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813098
    Description:

    This article examines the grievance system, or the dispute- or complaint-resolution system, in the workplace.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310513090
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of employees to be covered by extended health, dental or disability insurance plans compared with the self-employed.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813096
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035374
    Description:

    This article examines the issue of non-union members who are covered by collective agreements, comparing the Canadian picture in the late 1990s with that of the United States. An accompanying update, which covers the first half of 2000, provides Perspectives annual socio-demograhic and economic profile of union members.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025069
    Description:

    Employment and unemployment rates have historically been used as indicators of labour market conditions. This study evaluates the performance of another indicator, the Help-wanted Index, and re-examines the association between it and employment rates, unemployment rates and hirings from 1981 to 1999.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034686
    Description:

    This update of Perspectives' socio-demographic and economic profile of union members provides unionization rates according to the new North American Industry Classification System and the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification. The update, which extends to the provincial level, also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013594
    Description:

    Factors such as age, family circumstances, work schedules and leave entitlements all play a role in work absences.Using data from the redesigned Labour Force Survey and the 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements, this article provides an up-to-date, in-depth look at the effect of these and other factors. For the first time, maternity leave can be excluded from these statistics.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043386
    Description:

    This article traces union membership over the last 30 years. Itlooks at current demographic and labour market characteristics of union members, as well as wages, benefits and work arrangements of both union and non-union members. Also examined are wage increases vis-à-vis inflation rates, and the state of labour unrest over the past two decades. An international look at union rates is also provided. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day this year.)

    Release date: 1997-12-10

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Analysis (37)

Analysis (37) (25 of 37 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113220
    Description:

    Commuting is, to a large extent, an urban phenomenon. Close to 80% of commuting takes place between municipalities within larger urban centres. But commuting patterns are becoming increasingly complex and rural commuting is more complex than commonly believed. For persons in rural and small-town areas, rural-to-rural commuting is as large as rural-to-urban commuting. Moreover, rural jobs are more than twice as reliant on in-commuting rural workers as they are on in-commuting urban workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613190
    Description:

    Past studies of illness-related work absences have focused on annual figures and have not differentiated between full- and part-week absences. But the two have quite different seasonal patterns and long-term trends.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613189
    Description:

    The strong growth of telework in the 1990s seems to have stalled since the turn of the century. Despite significant improvements in the infrastructure, the fall-off in telework popularity has been pervasive.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-001-X20070019644
    Description:

    The North American experience with international migration stands in unique contrast to much of the rest of the world. This paper uses microdata drawn from the national censuses of Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and applies the same methodological framework to these data to examine the impact of international migration on the labour market. We find a numerically comparable and statistically significant inverse relation between immigrant-induced shifts in labour supply and wages in each of the three countries: A 10% labour supply shift is associated with about a 3% to 4% opposite-signed change in wages. Despite the similarity in the wage elasticity, the impact of international migration on the wage structure differs significantly across countries. In Canada, international migration substantially narrowed wage inequality because immigrants in Canada tend to be disproportionately high-skilled. In the United States, international migration substantially increased wage inequality because immigrants in the United States tend to be disproportionately low-skilled. In Mexico, however, emigration rates are highest in the middle of the skill distribution and lowest at the extremes. As a result, international migration greatly increased relative wages in the middle of the Mexican skill distribution and lowered relative wages at the extremes. Paradoxically, the large-scale migration of workers from Mexico may have slightly reduced the relative wage of the low-skill workers remaining in that country.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813170
    Description:

    Improvements during the 1980s and 1990s in Canada's strike and lockout statistics appear to have stalled somewhat in recent years. The drop in time lost to industrial disputes at the beginning of the decade was offset by increases in 2004 and 2005. It is too early to say if this is the beginning of a new trend. What can be done, however, is to gain an understanding of recent stoppages by looking at the main areas of dispute, the jurisdictions in which the stoppages occurred, and how they were resolved.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513163
    Description:

    Finding the right person for the job is the goal of every hiring decision. In most cases, a personal interview combined with a skill-specific test will be enough for both parties to see if they are compatible. However, for dangerous jobs or where public safety or security is at stake, more stringent requirements need to be met. Medical examinations, security checks, and drugs tests are three screening techniques employers use.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510813148
    Description:

    Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410813125
    Description:

    This article discusses recent trends in the union movement, including numbers of members, the proportion of women, the transition from goods-producing to service industries, the shift in share from private- to public-sector unions, and in-roads among part-time workers and in smaller workplaces.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046806
    Description:

    This article examines the entry of women into the paid labour force, their continued concentration in certain kinds of employment and the increasing tendency for men to do the kinds of jobs traditionally performed by women.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813098
    Description:

    This article examines the grievance system, or the dispute- or complaint-resolution system, in the workplace.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310513090
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of employees to be covered by extended health, dental or disability insurance plans compared with the self-employed.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813096
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035374
    Description:

    This article examines the issue of non-union members who are covered by collective agreements, comparing the Canadian picture in the late 1990s with that of the United States. An accompanying update, which covers the first half of 2000, provides Perspectives annual socio-demograhic and economic profile of union members.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025069
    Description:

    Employment and unemployment rates have historically been used as indicators of labour market conditions. This study evaluates the performance of another indicator, the Help-wanted Index, and re-examines the association between it and employment rates, unemployment rates and hirings from 1981 to 1999.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034686
    Description:

    This update of Perspectives' socio-demographic and economic profile of union members provides unionization rates according to the new North American Industry Classification System and the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification. The update, which extends to the provincial level, also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013594
    Description:

    Factors such as age, family circumstances, work schedules and leave entitlements all play a role in work absences.Using data from the redesigned Labour Force Survey and the 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements, this article provides an up-to-date, in-depth look at the effect of these and other factors. For the first time, maternity leave can be excluded from these statistics.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043386
    Description:

    This article traces union membership over the last 30 years. Itlooks at current demographic and labour market characteristics of union members, as well as wages, benefits and work arrangements of both union and non-union members. Also examined are wage increases vis-à-vis inflation rates, and the state of labour unrest over the past two decades. An international look at union rates is also provided. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day this year.)

    Release date: 1997-12-10

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