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All (67)

All (67) (25 of 67 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311851
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on languages of work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on the use of English, French and other languages at work. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, Quebec and the rest of Canada, and selected census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201200111750
    Description:

    This article provides estimates of the expected working life and post-retirement life-expectancy of workers when they reach 50 years of age. Estimates for various educational attainment categories are also provided, by taking both voluntary and involuntary retirements into account.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100411434
    Description:

    As the recovery matured during the year, some economic trends closely resembled the performance of the economy before the recession. This was most evident in commodity prices, the stock market and the exchange rate. However, the pattern of net lending and borrowing showed a fundamental shift occurred during the recession and into the recovery.

    Release date: 2011-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100311422
    Description:

    Business investment has played a key role in the recent recession and recovery. Energy and mining led the recovery in 2010, and intentions point to continued growth in 2011. Manufacturers also expect to invest more in 2011, although investment spending in this sector continues to diverge widely between expanding and contracting industries.

    Release date: 2011-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000411150
    Description:

    The global recession of 2008-2009 was less severe and shorter in Canada. While exports and corporate profits fell sharply due to the global recession, domestic spending was sustained by strong balance sheets and savings built up in previous years and a financial system that emerged largely unscathed from the crisis in the US and Europe. The industrial pattern of the recession in Canada was quite similar to previous recessions.

    Release date: 2010-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000111075
    Description:

    Since 1980, labour productivity has risen during recessions in Canada and the US, with the exception of Canada during 2008-2009. A detailed examination of each cyclical downturn since 1980 shows that employers have moved faster to cut labour inputs during recessions, especially in the US.

    Release date: 2010-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713233
    Description:

    Workers at the low end of the earnings scale, workers with less education, non-unionized workers and women are all less likely than other workers to receive employer-sponsored training. But they are also less likely to decline it when it is offered. Within each of the first three categories, women lag behind men in receiving training. Controlling for various individual, job and workplace characteristics helps explain some of these persistent labour market differences between men and women.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110782
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a demographic portrait of justice-related occupations and their evolution between 1991 and 2006. Four groups are analysed in more detail: police officers, private security officers, court workers and correctional service officers. Most of the data analysed are from the 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, and some complementary information from other sources is also used. The evolution of the age structure of these groups is analyzed and compared to the age structure of all Canadian workers. Questions related to the aging and renewal of the workforce are also addressed.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800410559
    Description:

    Despite the turmoil in financial markets and a slowdown in the US, Canada's growth was remarkably steady in 2007. This reflects the ongoing boom in the resource sector and the boost the rising loonie gave to domestic spending.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710313183
    Description:

    A variety of factors contributed to the slowdown of output growth relative to employment growth during 2006. However, 2006 was not unique, gross domestic product and job growth rates have converged frequently in recent years, including most of 2002 and 2003. After reviewing the sources of last year's productivity slowdown by industry, the negative impact of labour shortages on the quality of labour, especially in western Canada, is examined

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070049615
    Description:

    Canadians proved increasingly adaptable to the changes in the economy, moving to Alberta in increasing numbers to find jobs while at the same time responding to the challenge of an aging population and globalization.

    Release date: 2007-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070039602
    Description:

    The productivity slowdown during 2006 largely originated in the mining and manufacturing industries. The drop in mining was part of a long-term trend, while for manufacturing it was mostly cyclical. Many sectors struggled with labour quality as a result of shortages, especially in western Canada.

    Release date: 2007-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060059196
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the reasons behind the recent rebound in the British Columbia economy from its doldrums in the 1990s. It also examines how the current boom in British Columbia differs from Alberta and what can be learned from Alberta's experience.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311851
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on languages of work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on the use of English, French and other languages at work. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, Quebec and the rest of Canada, and selected census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

Analysis (65)

Analysis (65) (25 of 65 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201200111750
    Description:

    This article provides estimates of the expected working life and post-retirement life-expectancy of workers when they reach 50 years of age. Estimates for various educational attainment categories are also provided, by taking both voluntary and involuntary retirements into account.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100411434
    Description:

    As the recovery matured during the year, some economic trends closely resembled the performance of the economy before the recession. This was most evident in commodity prices, the stock market and the exchange rate. However, the pattern of net lending and borrowing showed a fundamental shift occurred during the recession and into the recovery.

    Release date: 2011-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100311422
    Description:

    Business investment has played a key role in the recent recession and recovery. Energy and mining led the recovery in 2010, and intentions point to continued growth in 2011. Manufacturers also expect to invest more in 2011, although investment spending in this sector continues to diverge widely between expanding and contracting industries.

    Release date: 2011-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000411150
    Description:

    The global recession of 2008-2009 was less severe and shorter in Canada. While exports and corporate profits fell sharply due to the global recession, domestic spending was sustained by strong balance sheets and savings built up in previous years and a financial system that emerged largely unscathed from the crisis in the US and Europe. The industrial pattern of the recession in Canada was quite similar to previous recessions.

    Release date: 2010-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000111075
    Description:

    Since 1980, labour productivity has risen during recessions in Canada and the US, with the exception of Canada during 2008-2009. A detailed examination of each cyclical downturn since 1980 shows that employers have moved faster to cut labour inputs during recessions, especially in the US.

    Release date: 2010-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713233
    Description:

    Workers at the low end of the earnings scale, workers with less education, non-unionized workers and women are all less likely than other workers to receive employer-sponsored training. But they are also less likely to decline it when it is offered. Within each of the first three categories, women lag behind men in receiving training. Controlling for various individual, job and workplace characteristics helps explain some of these persistent labour market differences between men and women.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110782
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a demographic portrait of justice-related occupations and their evolution between 1991 and 2006. Four groups are analysed in more detail: police officers, private security officers, court workers and correctional service officers. Most of the data analysed are from the 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, and some complementary information from other sources is also used. The evolution of the age structure of these groups is analyzed and compared to the age structure of all Canadian workers. Questions related to the aging and renewal of the workforce are also addressed.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800410559
    Description:

    Despite the turmoil in financial markets and a slowdown in the US, Canada's growth was remarkably steady in 2007. This reflects the ongoing boom in the resource sector and the boost the rising loonie gave to domestic spending.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710313183
    Description:

    A variety of factors contributed to the slowdown of output growth relative to employment growth during 2006. However, 2006 was not unique, gross domestic product and job growth rates have converged frequently in recent years, including most of 2002 and 2003. After reviewing the sources of last year's productivity slowdown by industry, the negative impact of labour shortages on the quality of labour, especially in western Canada, is examined

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070049615
    Description:

    Canadians proved increasingly adaptable to the changes in the economy, moving to Alberta in increasing numbers to find jobs while at the same time responding to the challenge of an aging population and globalization.

    Release date: 2007-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070039602
    Description:

    The productivity slowdown during 2006 largely originated in the mining and manufacturing industries. The drop in mining was part of a long-term trend, while for manufacturing it was mostly cyclical. Many sectors struggled with labour quality as a result of shortages, especially in western Canada.

    Release date: 2007-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060059196
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the reasons behind the recent rebound in the British Columbia economy from its doldrums in the 1990s. It also examines how the current boom in British Columbia differs from Alberta and what can be learned from Alberta's experience.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060029094
    Description:

    Most of the new trends that began in 2001 intensified last year, notably the growth in natural resources and construction and losses in factories and the ICT sector. This shift also equalized job growth in urban and rural areas. Almost all job growth was for older workers, reflecting both their increasing share of the population and growing attachment to the labour force.

    Release date: 2006-02-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016225
    Description:

    The European Union Labour Forces Survey (LFS) is based on national surveys that were originally very different. For the past decade, under pressure from increasingly demanding users (particularly with respect to timeliness, comparability and flexibility), the LFS has been subjected to a constant process of quality improvement.

    The following topics are presented in this paper:A. the quality improvement process, which comprises screening national survey methods, target structure, legal foundations, quality reports, more accurate and more explicit definitions of components, etc.;B. expected or achieved results, which include an ongoing survey producing quarterly results within reasonable time frames, comparable employment and unemployment rates over time and space in more than 25 countries, specific information on current political topics, etc.;C. continuing shortcomings, such as implementation delays in certain countries, possibilities of longitudinal analysis, public access to microdata, etc.; D. future tasks envisioned, such as adaptation of the list of ISCO and ISCED variables and nomenclatures (to take into account evolution in employment and teaching methods), differential treatment of structural variables and increased recourse to administrative files (to limit respondent burden), harmonization of questionnaires, etc.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

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