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All (42)

All (42) (25 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154898
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine job vacancies for entry-level positions (job vacancies that require no work experience) from the employer perspective. The JVWS provides answers to the following questions: How many entry-level job vacancies are available? What are their characteristics? Which occupations offer entry-level positions? Are some education groups more affected than others?

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154878
    Description:

    This study provides additional insight into labour demand and supply based on the joint availability of job vacancy and unemployment data over the past two years (2015 and 2016). Specifically, it uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) and Labour Force Survey (LFS) to answer the following questions: To what extent are job vacancies and unemployment related? What can the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio tell us? To what extent do occupations differ in their relative degree of being slack (more workers than jobs) or tight (more jobs than workers)? How does the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio differ by education level?

    Release date: 2017-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611406
    Description:

    Between 2000 and 2008, Canada enjoyed steady, rapid employment growth, with an annual growth rate of 2%. Subsequently, as a result of the global economic downturn, Canada's labour market suffered substantial employment losses, particularly in late 2008 and the first few months of 2009.

    In this article, Labour Force Survey data are used to explore changes in employment in apprenticeable occupations over the 2008 to 2010 period, comparing those changes with those observed in all other occupations combined. Employment change is examined from the perspective of selected demographic characteristics, such as age group, level of education, sex and selected employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111394
    Description:

    The gender gap in hourly wages narrowed between the late 1980s and the late 2000s. This article analyses the narrowing wage gap according to the changing characteristics of men and women in paid work, the changes in pay received for those characteristics, and the extent to which who works in each period affects the results.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000511367
    Description:

    This article draws a profile of trade qualifiers in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program but has acquired enough practical work experience to write the examination to obtain the certificate of qualification (or certificate of competence) issued by the provincial or territorial authorities responsible for certifying trades workers. Trade qualifiers accounted for 43% of certificates of qualification issued in the apprenticeable trades in 2007.

    Release date: 2010-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113156
    Description:

    Trucking plays a major role in Canada's economy. But because of the sector's steady growth, an aging workforce, and the declining popularity of the occupation, the industry may soon face a shortage of qualified truckers. A recent overall picture of truck drivers based on various sources is presented.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513143
    Description:

    This article investigates factors influencing the chances of find a job for people who were unemployed for more than six months in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Results for the short-term jobless are included for comparison.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413118
    Description:

    This paper examines the costs of long-term unemployment. In economic terms, it leads to lower tax revenues, lower productivity and costlier social and health care programs. On a personal level, it is associated with financial difficulties, loss of self-esteem and health problems.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410213113
    Description:

    Why are so many seniors still at work? Some enjoy their job and intend on working indefinitely, while others feel forced to work for economic reasons. The 2001 Census is used to update an earlier study focussing on the occupations of seniors who continue to work beyond the age of 65, the traditional age of retirement.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036754
    Description:

    This article examines some of the many factors that influence the well-being of Canada's culture sector and its workforce: the country's general economic conditions; government programs and policies; and consumer demand, of both domestic and imported culture goods and services.

    The forces of economic, social, political and technological change are radically transforming the world of culture and its labour force. The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of the culture workforce to meet increased demand for culture goods and services. This period of growth paused with the 1990/91 recession: jobs, earnings and revenues all fell off. With the end of the recession, the labour market rebounded and culture workers rode this high employment wave throughout the remainder of the decade.

    Countries have become more conscious of the role that culture plays in their development, their identity and the sustenance of their value systems. In many countries culture sectors are now targets of international economic development policies. Global trade and the continued high demand in Canada for imported culture goods and services make the culture economy in this country (and, in turn, employment in the culture sector) variable and highly competitive.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310913100
    Description:

    This article examines the many dimensions of seasonality in employment to determine the extent to which each contributes to frequent reliance on Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046498
    Description:

    This study examines the effects of motherhood and the timing of motherhood on the wages of Canadian women.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213084
    Description:

    This paper looks at the availability of qualified workers as baby boomers retire, a key challenge facing employers over the first decades of the 21st century. It also examines which industries and occupations may be affected more than others.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126036
    Description:

    The issue of male-female wage inequality is complex, and requires analysis from a number of different perspectives. This article demonstrates the importance of measurement, decomposition techniques and differences in the gap along the wage scale.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111301
    Description:

    This section provides series relating to the labour force, employment, unemployment and job vacancies. For the most part, the series are obtained from publications of Statistics Canada, formerly the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Some of the older series are directly from census tabulations while others are derived from such tabulations but incorporate adjustments to improve the consistency of the series through time. Many of the series of more recent vintage are derived from the Labour Force Survey. Also included are series from the Statistics Canada Employment Survey, the Statistics Canada Job Vacancy Survey, the set of Help-Wanted Indexes developed in the Department of Finance and taken over subsequently by Statistics Canada, and a few other series.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

Analysis (41)

Analysis (41) (25 of 41 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154898
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine job vacancies for entry-level positions (job vacancies that require no work experience) from the employer perspective. The JVWS provides answers to the following questions: How many entry-level job vacancies are available? What are their characteristics? Which occupations offer entry-level positions? Are some education groups more affected than others?

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154878
    Description:

    This study provides additional insight into labour demand and supply based on the joint availability of job vacancy and unemployment data over the past two years (2015 and 2016). Specifically, it uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) and Labour Force Survey (LFS) to answer the following questions: To what extent are job vacancies and unemployment related? What can the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio tell us? To what extent do occupations differ in their relative degree of being slack (more workers than jobs) or tight (more jobs than workers)? How does the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio differ by education level?

    Release date: 2017-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611406
    Description:

    Between 2000 and 2008, Canada enjoyed steady, rapid employment growth, with an annual growth rate of 2%. Subsequently, as a result of the global economic downturn, Canada's labour market suffered substantial employment losses, particularly in late 2008 and the first few months of 2009.

    In this article, Labour Force Survey data are used to explore changes in employment in apprenticeable occupations over the 2008 to 2010 period, comparing those changes with those observed in all other occupations combined. Employment change is examined from the perspective of selected demographic characteristics, such as age group, level of education, sex and selected employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111394
    Description:

    The gender gap in hourly wages narrowed between the late 1980s and the late 2000s. This article analyses the narrowing wage gap according to the changing characteristics of men and women in paid work, the changes in pay received for those characteristics, and the extent to which who works in each period affects the results.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000511367
    Description:

    This article draws a profile of trade qualifiers in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program but has acquired enough practical work experience to write the examination to obtain the certificate of qualification (or certificate of competence) issued by the provincial or territorial authorities responsible for certifying trades workers. Trade qualifiers accounted for 43% of certificates of qualification issued in the apprenticeable trades in 2007.

    Release date: 2010-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113156
    Description:

    Trucking plays a major role in Canada's economy. But because of the sector's steady growth, an aging workforce, and the declining popularity of the occupation, the industry may soon face a shortage of qualified truckers. A recent overall picture of truck drivers based on various sources is presented.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513143
    Description:

    This article investigates factors influencing the chances of find a job for people who were unemployed for more than six months in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Results for the short-term jobless are included for comparison.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413118
    Description:

    This paper examines the costs of long-term unemployment. In economic terms, it leads to lower tax revenues, lower productivity and costlier social and health care programs. On a personal level, it is associated with financial difficulties, loss of self-esteem and health problems.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410213113
    Description:

    Why are so many seniors still at work? Some enjoy their job and intend on working indefinitely, while others feel forced to work for economic reasons. The 2001 Census is used to update an earlier study focussing on the occupations of seniors who continue to work beyond the age of 65, the traditional age of retirement.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036754
    Description:

    This article examines some of the many factors that influence the well-being of Canada's culture sector and its workforce: the country's general economic conditions; government programs and policies; and consumer demand, of both domestic and imported culture goods and services.

    The forces of economic, social, political and technological change are radically transforming the world of culture and its labour force. The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of the culture workforce to meet increased demand for culture goods and services. This period of growth paused with the 1990/91 recession: jobs, earnings and revenues all fell off. With the end of the recession, the labour market rebounded and culture workers rode this high employment wave throughout the remainder of the decade.

    Countries have become more conscious of the role that culture plays in their development, their identity and the sustenance of their value systems. In many countries culture sectors are now targets of international economic development policies. Global trade and the continued high demand in Canada for imported culture goods and services make the culture economy in this country (and, in turn, employment in the culture sector) variable and highly competitive.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310913100
    Description:

    This article examines the many dimensions of seasonality in employment to determine the extent to which each contributes to frequent reliance on Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046498
    Description:

    This study examines the effects of motherhood and the timing of motherhood on the wages of Canadian women.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213084
    Description:

    This paper looks at the availability of qualified workers as baby boomers retire, a key challenge facing employers over the first decades of the 21st century. It also examines which industries and occupations may be affected more than others.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126036
    Description:

    The issue of male-female wage inequality is complex, and requires analysis from a number of different perspectives. This article demonstrates the importance of measurement, decomposition techniques and differences in the gap along the wage scale.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

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