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All (32)

All (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114094
    Description:

    This article examines the share of adults aged 25 to 65 with a university degree who have lower literacy skills, lower numeracy skills, or both, and the factors most likely to be associated with lower literacy or numeracy skills among university graduates. In this article, individuals with lower literacy and lower numeracy are defined as those who scored at level 2 or below (out of 5 levels) in tests administered to survey respondents who participated in the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311851
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on languages of work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on the use of English, French and other languages at work. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, Quebec and the rest of Canada, and selected census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311500
    Description:

    Self-employment is an important source of jobs for immigrants, more so than for non-immigrants. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine how self-employed immigrants differ from their non-immigrant counterparts across a number of personal and job characteristics. It also compares the reasons immigrants and non-immigrants report for entering and staying in self-employment, based on data from the Survey of Self-Employment.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910113222
    Description:

    Traditional age-earnings profiles, based on cross-sectional data, typically follow an inverted U-shaped pattern with annual earnings peaking around middle age. With longitudinal data on hourly earnings, the picture changes considerably.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113220
    Description:

    Commuting is, to a large extent, an urban phenomenon. Close to 80% of commuting takes place between municipalities within larger urban centres. But commuting patterns are becoming increasingly complex and rural commuting is more complex than commonly believed. For persons in rural and small-town areas, rural-to-rural commuting is as large as rural-to-urban commuting. Moreover, rural jobs are more than twice as reliant on in-commuting rural workers as they are on in-commuting urban workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070019568
    Description:

    A look at the hours worked by employees over a five-year period and how this affected their well-being.

    Release date: 2007-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513164
    Description:

    Between 1971 and 2005, Canada's labour force became more educated in line with the increased credentials of new entrants, while the aging of the workforce shifted the experience profile upwards. However, this was not reflected in unemployment rates, which were for the most part slightly higher in 2005 than in 1971. What factors are at play? The article looks at specific age-education combinations to yield a more nuanced long-term perspective on current labour market conditions.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038967
    Description:

    In recent years, commuting patterns have become more complex as employment has grown more rapidly in the suburbs than in city core areas. Faced with few convenient public transit options, the increasing numbers of people who now commute cross-town to jobs in these suburbs overwhelmingly drive to work. This article examines commuting patterns between 1996 and 2001 as they relate to recent job growth in the suburbs. It briefly looks at the demographic characteristics of commuters and explores some of the implications that changing work locations and commute patterns have for infrastructure in Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030096579
    Description:

    This paper looks at the surge in demand for people skilled in computer specialties after the rapid growth of the information, communication and technology (ICT) industry in the 1990s. It uses data from the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 2003-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026526
    Description:

    This study examines the labour market outcomes of university and college graduates who entered the work force at three points of the economic cycle: 1986, 1990 and 1995. It uses data from the National Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024603
    Description:

    Hours polarization, or the move away from the standard work week to either a shorter or longer work week, is a continuing trend in Canada. This study looks at how hours polarization has grown in the 1990s. (Based on a paper presented at Statistics Canada's Economic Conference 1999.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311851
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on languages of work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on the use of English, French and other languages at work. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, Quebec and the rest of Canada, and selected census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

Analysis (31)

Analysis (31) (25 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114094
    Description:

    This article examines the share of adults aged 25 to 65 with a university degree who have lower literacy skills, lower numeracy skills, or both, and the factors most likely to be associated with lower literacy or numeracy skills among university graduates. In this article, individuals with lower literacy and lower numeracy are defined as those who scored at level 2 or below (out of 5 levels) in tests administered to survey respondents who participated in the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311500
    Description:

    Self-employment is an important source of jobs for immigrants, more so than for non-immigrants. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine how self-employed immigrants differ from their non-immigrant counterparts across a number of personal and job characteristics. It also compares the reasons immigrants and non-immigrants report for entering and staying in self-employment, based on data from the Survey of Self-Employment.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910113222
    Description:

    Traditional age-earnings profiles, based on cross-sectional data, typically follow an inverted U-shaped pattern with annual earnings peaking around middle age. With longitudinal data on hourly earnings, the picture changes considerably.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113220
    Description:

    Commuting is, to a large extent, an urban phenomenon. Close to 80% of commuting takes place between municipalities within larger urban centres. But commuting patterns are becoming increasingly complex and rural commuting is more complex than commonly believed. For persons in rural and small-town areas, rural-to-rural commuting is as large as rural-to-urban commuting. Moreover, rural jobs are more than twice as reliant on in-commuting rural workers as they are on in-commuting urban workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070019568
    Description:

    A look at the hours worked by employees over a five-year period and how this affected their well-being.

    Release date: 2007-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513164
    Description:

    Between 1971 and 2005, Canada's labour force became more educated in line with the increased credentials of new entrants, while the aging of the workforce shifted the experience profile upwards. However, this was not reflected in unemployment rates, which were for the most part slightly higher in 2005 than in 1971. What factors are at play? The article looks at specific age-education combinations to yield a more nuanced long-term perspective on current labour market conditions.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038967
    Description:

    In recent years, commuting patterns have become more complex as employment has grown more rapidly in the suburbs than in city core areas. Faced with few convenient public transit options, the increasing numbers of people who now commute cross-town to jobs in these suburbs overwhelmingly drive to work. This article examines commuting patterns between 1996 and 2001 as they relate to recent job growth in the suburbs. It briefly looks at the demographic characteristics of commuters and explores some of the implications that changing work locations and commute patterns have for infrastructure in Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030096579
    Description:

    This paper looks at the surge in demand for people skilled in computer specialties after the rapid growth of the information, communication and technology (ICT) industry in the 1990s. It uses data from the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 2003-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026526
    Description:

    This study examines the labour market outcomes of university and college graduates who entered the work force at three points of the economic cycle: 1986, 1990 and 1995. It uses data from the National Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024603
    Description:

    Hours polarization, or the move away from the standard work week to either a shorter or longer work week, is a continuing trend in Canada. This study looks at how hours polarization has grown in the 1990s. (Based on a paper presented at Statistics Canada's Economic Conference 1999.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980013842
    Description:

    This study presents estimates of job reallocation, calculated as gross job gains plus gross job losses; compares job reallocation in the service sector to that in the goods-producing sector; explains why innovative industries do not necessarily have similar employment patterns; and examines why some industries that are less technologically sophisticated appear to exhibit the same job reallocation patterns as some innovative industries.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

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