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All (71)

All (71) (25 of 71 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913256
    Description:

    This article examines long-term trends in employment for postsecondary students. The rate of employment, hours of work and employment earnings of male and female students are covered. How other student characteristics relate to employment is also addressed. Particular attention is paid to student employment during labour market downturns.

    Release date: 2010-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010813255
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810213204
    Description:

    The pay structure for Canada's workers has changed over the past decade. Pay rates have risen in Alberta, especially since 2004. In Ontario and Quebec, earnings in manufacturing have not fallen substantially, despite sharp decreases in employment. Even after the turbulence of the 2001 to 2004 period, average earnings in the CT sector ended up rising 12% in real terms. Along with changes in trade patterns and technology use, demographic trends have also influenced labour market conditions and earnings. This article examines the evolution of earnings in Canada from 1997 to 2007.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813192
    Description:

    For some years now, attention has been focused on the predicted retirement patterns of the baby-boom generation since a wave of early departures could seriously disrupt the labour force. However, recent studies and indicators suggest that baby boomers may not in fact be collectively fleeing employment for 'freedom 55. In 2006, a record proportion of 60 to 64 year-olds were in the labour force (45%) and the retirement age remained steady at 61.5. The article examines labour market trends of the population aged 55 to 64 and the employment characteristics of workers in this age group vis à vis those aged 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710313184
    Description:

    The effects of literacy and numeracy skills on the employability and incomes of high school dropouts are compared with those of graduates. Regression analysis based on the demographic characteristics and family backgrounds of early school leavers indicates that increasing proficiency in literacy and numeracy significantly improves the probability of being employed, the number of hours worked, and income.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070069980
    Description:

    The labour force participation rate will inevitably decline over the next two decades. This reflects the retirement of the boomer generation and a low birth rate in recent years. Various scenarios involving increased immigration and keeping older workers in the labour force longer can mitigate but not reverse these trends

    Release date: 2007-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070009627
    Description:

    This report examines immigrant settlement in terms of the subjective assessments and perceptions of immigrants themselves. Overall, it provides a broad overview of new immigrants' perceptions, with emphasis on their responses to a broad range of questions rather than a single issue. Differences are examined across a limited set of characteristics, with particular focus on admission categories.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111302
    Description:

    The statistics of this section are in eight parts as follows: labour income (series E1-40); employment, earnings and hours of work (series E41-135); employer labour cost (series E136-151); unemployment insurance (series E152-171); employment service (series E172-174); labour unions and strikes and lockouts (series E175-197); index numbers of wage rates, wage rates and salaries (series E198-375); workmen's compensation (series E376-389).

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013567
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) attempts to measure the degree of intergenerational redistribution that exists within a given fiscal and demographic structure. This approach produces a more comprehensive measure of the extent of intergenerational redistribution stemming from government programs than traditional measures that are based solely on government debt and deficits.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (68)

Analysis (68) (25 of 68 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913256
    Description:

    This article examines long-term trends in employment for postsecondary students. The rate of employment, hours of work and employment earnings of male and female students are covered. How other student characteristics relate to employment is also addressed. Particular attention is paid to student employment during labour market downturns.

    Release date: 2010-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010813255
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810213204
    Description:

    The pay structure for Canada's workers has changed over the past decade. Pay rates have risen in Alberta, especially since 2004. In Ontario and Quebec, earnings in manufacturing have not fallen substantially, despite sharp decreases in employment. Even after the turbulence of the 2001 to 2004 period, average earnings in the CT sector ended up rising 12% in real terms. Along with changes in trade patterns and technology use, demographic trends have also influenced labour market conditions and earnings. This article examines the evolution of earnings in Canada from 1997 to 2007.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813192
    Description:

    For some years now, attention has been focused on the predicted retirement patterns of the baby-boom generation since a wave of early departures could seriously disrupt the labour force. However, recent studies and indicators suggest that baby boomers may not in fact be collectively fleeing employment for 'freedom 55. In 2006, a record proportion of 60 to 64 year-olds were in the labour force (45%) and the retirement age remained steady at 61.5. The article examines labour market trends of the population aged 55 to 64 and the employment characteristics of workers in this age group vis à vis those aged 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710313184
    Description:

    The effects of literacy and numeracy skills on the employability and incomes of high school dropouts are compared with those of graduates. Regression analysis based on the demographic characteristics and family backgrounds of early school leavers indicates that increasing proficiency in literacy and numeracy significantly improves the probability of being employed, the number of hours worked, and income.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070069980
    Description:

    The labour force participation rate will inevitably decline over the next two decades. This reflects the retirement of the boomer generation and a low birth rate in recent years. Various scenarios involving increased immigration and keeping older workers in the labour force longer can mitigate but not reverse these trends

    Release date: 2007-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070009627
    Description:

    This report examines immigrant settlement in terms of the subjective assessments and perceptions of immigrants themselves. Overall, it provides a broad overview of new immigrants' perceptions, with emphasis on their responses to a broad range of questions rather than a single issue. Differences are examined across a limited set of characteristics, with particular focus on admission categories.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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