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All (29)

All (29) (25 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713214
    Description:

    Canada's military makes up a small but significant segment of Canadian society and is an important part of the country's national image, both at home and abroad. After declining through the 1990s, the forces have grown since 2001, reaching 88,000 in 2006. This article profiles the personnel of the Canadian Forces as a special occupational group distinct from the rest of the Canadian labour force. It also compares the military's prevalence of rates of work stress and other work-related mental health issues with those of the civilian working population and investigates whether any specific groups experience a higher prevalence.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210466
    Description:

    Work stress is widely recognized as a major challenge to both the individual and the economy. It can come from many sources and affect people in different ways. As well, a variety of mitigating factors enter the equation. This article investigates levels, sources and effects of work stress for various socio-demographic and occupational groups.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113156
    Description:

    Trucking plays a major role in Canada's economy. But because of the sector's steady growth, an aging workforce, and the declining popularity of the occupation, the industry may soon face a shortage of qualified truckers. A recent overall picture of truck drivers based on various sources is presented.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813097
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors that influence the decision to hire domestic help.

    Release date: 2003-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313088
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the statistics compiled from Human Resources and Development Canada data to determine whether new parents have responded to recent changes to the maternity, parental and adoption benefits available under the Employment Insurance program.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010045727
    Description:

    This article examines trends in two groups of part-time workers: those working very short hours and those doing closer to full time.

    Release date: 2001-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034685
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been paid in recent years to self-employment in Canada, especially to workers' reasons for choosing this option. Have they been "pushed" by lack of full-time paid jobs or "pulled" by the positive benefits of self-employment? This article looks at the characteristics of the self-employed and the growth of self-employment in Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19970044038
    Description:

    Profiles are available by type of business (unincorporated, incorporated, and both combined) for about 680 different industries in Canada. They are also produced for each province and territory, but with reduced industry detail. This article focuses on revenue, profit, assets and equity.

    Release date: 1998-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980033947
    Description:

    As a complement to "Working at home," published in the Summer 1998 issue, this study focuses on the self-employed who work from home. Who are they? What do they do? Why do they work from home? These are some of the questions addressed.

    Release date: 1998-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980023824
    Description:

    Working at home is becoming more popular. Who works at home? What are the conditions, pay and benefits? How many hours does it involve? This article provides a look at this growing phenomenon.

    Release date: 1998-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043385
    Description:

    The proportion of non-permanent jobs is relatively high in eastern Canada, a finding only partly explained by the prevalence of seasonal work. This article provides a regional analysis of seasonal, temporary and occasional jobs. It also asks whether non-permanent jobs include fewer benefits than permanent ones.Where possible, the study examines subprovincial data.

    Release date: 1997-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033209
    Description:

    Many Canadians believe that job instability and job loss have increased in the 1990s. Using a new longitudinal data source, this article explores the role of the business cycle, changes in industrial demand, and firm size in the growth in permanent layoffs. An overview of the work displacement process is also included. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer, February 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012992
    Description:

    Jobs have been declining in the clothing industry since the late 1980s while production has grown. This article examines this trend, profiles those employed in the industry since 1981, and discusses factors most likely to affect future employment trends. National, provincial and

    international data are also presented.

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003127
    Description:

    Between 1975 and 1993, part-time jobs grew much faster than full-time jobs. The article examines the labour market by looking at jobs rather than workers

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400244
    Description:

    This article profiles Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries over the last decade with a focus on the recent recession.

    Release date: 1994-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200353
    Description:

    More than one-quarter of all time-loss claims due to work accidents are for back injuries. This article traces the pattern of growth in back-injury claims accepted by Workers' Compensation Boards during the last decade.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200347
    Description:

    This paper identifies the characteristics of workers affected by permanent layoffs and the types of industries and firms in which they work.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

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Analysis (29)

Analysis (29) (25 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713214
    Description:

    Canada's military makes up a small but significant segment of Canadian society and is an important part of the country's national image, both at home and abroad. After declining through the 1990s, the forces have grown since 2001, reaching 88,000 in 2006. This article profiles the personnel of the Canadian Forces as a special occupational group distinct from the rest of the Canadian labour force. It also compares the military's prevalence of rates of work stress and other work-related mental health issues with those of the civilian working population and investigates whether any specific groups experience a higher prevalence.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210466
    Description:

    Work stress is widely recognized as a major challenge to both the individual and the economy. It can come from many sources and affect people in different ways. As well, a variety of mitigating factors enter the equation. This article investigates levels, sources and effects of work stress for various socio-demographic and occupational groups.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113156
    Description:

    Trucking plays a major role in Canada's economy. But because of the sector's steady growth, an aging workforce, and the declining popularity of the occupation, the industry may soon face a shortage of qualified truckers. A recent overall picture of truck drivers based on various sources is presented.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813097
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors that influence the decision to hire domestic help.

    Release date: 2003-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313088
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the statistics compiled from Human Resources and Development Canada data to determine whether new parents have responded to recent changes to the maternity, parental and adoption benefits available under the Employment Insurance program.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010045727
    Description:

    This article examines trends in two groups of part-time workers: those working very short hours and those doing closer to full time.

    Release date: 2001-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034685
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been paid in recent years to self-employment in Canada, especially to workers' reasons for choosing this option. Have they been "pushed" by lack of full-time paid jobs or "pulled" by the positive benefits of self-employment? This article looks at the characteristics of the self-employed and the growth of self-employment in Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19970044038
    Description:

    Profiles are available by type of business (unincorporated, incorporated, and both combined) for about 680 different industries in Canada. They are also produced for each province and territory, but with reduced industry detail. This article focuses on revenue, profit, assets and equity.

    Release date: 1998-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980033947
    Description:

    As a complement to "Working at home," published in the Summer 1998 issue, this study focuses on the self-employed who work from home. Who are they? What do they do? Why do they work from home? These are some of the questions addressed.

    Release date: 1998-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980023824
    Description:

    Working at home is becoming more popular. Who works at home? What are the conditions, pay and benefits? How many hours does it involve? This article provides a look at this growing phenomenon.

    Release date: 1998-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043385
    Description:

    The proportion of non-permanent jobs is relatively high in eastern Canada, a finding only partly explained by the prevalence of seasonal work. This article provides a regional analysis of seasonal, temporary and occasional jobs. It also asks whether non-permanent jobs include fewer benefits than permanent ones.Where possible, the study examines subprovincial data.

    Release date: 1997-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033209
    Description:

    Many Canadians believe that job instability and job loss have increased in the 1990s. Using a new longitudinal data source, this article explores the role of the business cycle, changes in industrial demand, and firm size in the growth in permanent layoffs. An overview of the work displacement process is also included. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer, February 1997.)

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012992
    Description:

    Jobs have been declining in the clothing industry since the late 1980s while production has grown. This article examines this trend, profiles those employed in the industry since 1981, and discusses factors most likely to affect future employment trends. National, provincial and

    international data are also presented.

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003127
    Description:

    Between 1975 and 1993, part-time jobs grew much faster than full-time jobs. The article examines the labour market by looking at jobs rather than workers

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400244
    Description:

    This article profiles Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries over the last decade with a focus on the recent recession.

    Release date: 1994-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200353
    Description:

    More than one-quarter of all time-loss claims due to work accidents are for back injuries. This article traces the pattern of growth in back-injury claims accepted by Workers' Compensation Boards during the last decade.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200347
    Description:

    This paper identifies the characteristics of workers affected by permanent layoffs and the types of industries and firms in which they work.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

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