Statistics by subject – Labour

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513229
    Description:

    Longitudinal data show that disability can be temporary or episodic. Between 1999 and 2004, only 13% of those reporting a disability were affected for the entire 6 years. The longer the disability period, the more likely the individuals were to have less education, be women, be older, live alone and work fewer hours per year. Moreover, the effects of a disability were often felt outside the actual period of the disability.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126391
    Description:

    This article evaluates the relative importance of retirement and involuntary job loss for older workers. It also looks at the consequences of involuntary job loss; for example, reduced job opportunities and lower-quality or lower-wage jobs.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014886
    Description:

    Earnings of lawyers continue to exceed the overal average. This study presents a profile of lawyers and highlights the changes that have taken place in their demographic characteristics between 1970 and 1995, and in their earnings between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044756
    Description:

    Earnings of physicians continue to exceed the overall average. This article presents a demographic and earnings profile of the medical profession and highlights changes between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021601
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturers surveyed earlier this year reported some hiring problems. A glance at the type of labour shortages cited by small and large firms.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041575
    Description:

    An analysis of families in the top percentile of the income distribution, focusing on their sources of income.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300257
    Description:

    A study on the evolution of the average annual wages of men and women since the 1920s. The impact of overall economic activity and the characteristics of wage-earners are discussed.

    Release date: 1993-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300258
    Description:

    A note on anticipating employment trends in manufacturing

    Release date: 1993-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100256
    Description:

    Over the last 20 years, the increasing participation of women in the labour force has been one of the most significant changes in Canada. With that in mind, the author draws on data from previous censuses to review changes in women's earnings and work patterns, and the consequent impact on family income.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

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Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513229
    Description:

    Longitudinal data show that disability can be temporary or episodic. Between 1999 and 2004, only 13% of those reporting a disability were affected for the entire 6 years. The longer the disability period, the more likely the individuals were to have less education, be women, be older, live alone and work fewer hours per year. Moreover, the effects of a disability were often felt outside the actual period of the disability.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126391
    Description:

    This article evaluates the relative importance of retirement and involuntary job loss for older workers. It also looks at the consequences of involuntary job loss; for example, reduced job opportunities and lower-quality or lower-wage jobs.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014886
    Description:

    Earnings of lawyers continue to exceed the overal average. This study presents a profile of lawyers and highlights the changes that have taken place in their demographic characteristics between 1970 and 1995, and in their earnings between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044756
    Description:

    Earnings of physicians continue to exceed the overall average. This article presents a demographic and earnings profile of the medical profession and highlights changes between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021601
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturers surveyed earlier this year reported some hiring problems. A glance at the type of labour shortages cited by small and large firms.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041575
    Description:

    An analysis of families in the top percentile of the income distribution, focusing on their sources of income.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300257
    Description:

    A study on the evolution of the average annual wages of men and women since the 1920s. The impact of overall economic activity and the characteristics of wage-earners are discussed.

    Release date: 1993-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300258
    Description:

    A note on anticipating employment trends in manufacturing

    Release date: 1993-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100256
    Description:

    Over the last 20 years, the increasing participation of women in the labour force has been one of the most significant changes in Canada. With that in mind, the author draws on data from previous censuses to review changes in women's earnings and work patterns, and the consequent impact on family income.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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