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All (19)

All (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114115
    Description:

    This article provides information on the labour market participation of Canadians aged 25 to 64, who have a physical or mental disability. These could include problems with vision, hearing, mobility, flexibility, dexterity, pain, learning, as well as developmental, mental or psychological problems. The factors associated with increased labour market participation of people with disabilities are examined, as well as the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2014-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114011
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey to examine the migration patterns of ‘infrastructure tradespersons’ over the period 2006 to 2011. In this study, infrastructure tradespersons are defined as Canadian residents aged 25 to 44 with a certification in trades and whose major field of study was in construction trades, mechanics and repair, precision production, or heavy equipment machinery/crane operation.

    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311850
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20041127746
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of three distinct groups of non-standard workers: the self-employed, employees with permanent part-time jobs, and temporary employees. The economic consequences of non-standard work depend greatly on whether the situation is short-term or long-term.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313116
    Description:

    Although minimum wage workers are often young people living with their parents, other workers in this category are trying to support families. To evaluate the effects of a change in the minimum wage, it is essential to know who work for minimum wage and the types of jobs they hold.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213085
    Description:

    This article looks at the types of jobs created in Canada in 2002.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115980
    Description:

    Most analyses of part-time work naturally focus on employed persons, but the Labour Force Survey also asks the unemployed whether they are seeking a full- or part-time job. This article looks at trends in job seeking between 1976 and 2000, and the contribution of demographic and other factors to changes in the overall shares of the two groups of seekers.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19910032426
    Description:

    Has recovery begun? An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1991.

    Release date: 1991-09-05

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311850
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114115
    Description:

    This article provides information on the labour market participation of Canadians aged 25 to 64, who have a physical or mental disability. These could include problems with vision, hearing, mobility, flexibility, dexterity, pain, learning, as well as developmental, mental or psychological problems. The factors associated with increased labour market participation of people with disabilities are examined, as well as the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2014-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114011
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey to examine the migration patterns of ‘infrastructure tradespersons’ over the period 2006 to 2011. In this study, infrastructure tradespersons are defined as Canadian residents aged 25 to 44 with a certification in trades and whose major field of study was in construction trades, mechanics and repair, precision production, or heavy equipment machinery/crane operation.

    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20041127746
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of three distinct groups of non-standard workers: the self-employed, employees with permanent part-time jobs, and temporary employees. The economic consequences of non-standard work depend greatly on whether the situation is short-term or long-term.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313116
    Description:

    Although minimum wage workers are often young people living with their parents, other workers in this category are trying to support families. To evaluate the effects of a change in the minimum wage, it is essential to know who work for minimum wage and the types of jobs they hold.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213085
    Description:

    This article looks at the types of jobs created in Canada in 2002.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115980
    Description:

    Most analyses of part-time work naturally focus on employed persons, but the Labour Force Survey also asks the unemployed whether they are seeking a full- or part-time job. This article looks at trends in job seeking between 1976 and 2000, and the contribution of demographic and other factors to changes in the overall shares of the two groups of seekers.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19910032426
    Description:

    Has recovery begun? An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1991.

    Release date: 1991-09-05

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