Statistics by subject – Labour

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (27)

All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211639
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of labour market trends in 2011, focusing on changes between December 2010 and December 2011.

    Release date: 2012-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411579
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2010 and the first half of 2011. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211452
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111400
    Description:

    A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013259
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2009 and the first half of 2010. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010413247
    Description:

    In 2009, the labour market contracted after 16 straight years of employment growth. Using a number of sources, this review highlights the trends behind the headline unemployment rate: where jobs were lost, who was most affected and how hours of work changed. The report also identifies some relatively bright spots and draws comparisons with the U.S. and other advanced economies.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910913236
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between health and work. Poor mental and physical health were found to decrease the probability of being employed, particularly among men. For women, mental health problems were also associated with working fewer hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213224
    Description:

    Following six years of strong employment growth, 2008 started well as Canada's employment rate hit a new high and the unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low. In the last quarter of the year, however, job losses in cyclically sensitive industries such as manufacturing, natural resources and construction led to a drop in overall employment.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810313205
    Description:

    Hours of work can vary dramatically from job to job. And some research has indicated that the greater inequality of earnings into the mid-1990s was accompanied by increasing polarization of working hours. More recently, attention has focused on a decline in average working hours. This article quantifies changes in average work hours since the 1970s and examines how changes in the distribution of work hours contribute to the overall trend.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019184
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine trends in the labour market experiences of young men and women who are full-time students: younger students aged 15 to 17 years (of normal high school age) and older students aged 18 to 24 years old (a typical age for attending postsecondary institutions). The analysis also distinguishes between employment during the school year (September to April) and employment during the summer months.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511113152
    Description:

    After a period of decline from the late 1980s to mid-1990s, the youth employment rate (aged 15 to 24) rebounded between 1997 and 2004. Most of the jobs were in industries that traditionally hire large numbers of young people, including food services. The article documents the growth in youth employment by age, sex, industry and province.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211639
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of labour market trends in 2011, focusing on changes between December 2010 and December 2011.

    Release date: 2012-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411579
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2010 and the first half of 2011. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211452
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111400
    Description:

    A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013259
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2009 and the first half of 2010. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010413247
    Description:

    In 2009, the labour market contracted after 16 straight years of employment growth. Using a number of sources, this review highlights the trends behind the headline unemployment rate: where jobs were lost, who was most affected and how hours of work changed. The report also identifies some relatively bright spots and draws comparisons with the U.S. and other advanced economies.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910913236
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between health and work. Poor mental and physical health were found to decrease the probability of being employed, particularly among men. For women, mental health problems were also associated with working fewer hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213224
    Description:

    Following six years of strong employment growth, 2008 started well as Canada's employment rate hit a new high and the unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low. In the last quarter of the year, however, job losses in cyclically sensitive industries such as manufacturing, natural resources and construction led to a drop in overall employment.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810313205
    Description:

    Hours of work can vary dramatically from job to job. And some research has indicated that the greater inequality of earnings into the mid-1990s was accompanied by increasing polarization of working hours. More recently, attention has focused on a decline in average working hours. This article quantifies changes in average work hours since the 1970s and examines how changes in the distribution of work hours contribute to the overall trend.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019184
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine trends in the labour market experiences of young men and women who are full-time students: younger students aged 15 to 17 years (of normal high school age) and older students aged 18 to 24 years old (a typical age for attending postsecondary institutions). The analysis also distinguishes between employment during the school year (September to April) and employment during the summer months.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511113152
    Description:

    After a period of decline from the late 1980s to mid-1990s, the youth employment rate (aged 15 to 24) rebounded between 1997 and 2004. Most of the jobs were in industries that traditionally hire large numbers of young people, including food services. The article documents the growth in youth employment by age, sex, industry and province.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: