Statistics by subject – Labour

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713233
    Description:

    Workers at the low end of the earnings scale, workers with less education, non-unionized workers and women are all less likely than other workers to receive employer-sponsored training. But they are also less likely to decline it when it is offered. Within each of the first three categories, women lag behind men in receiving training. Controlling for various individual, job and workplace characteristics helps explain some of these persistent labour market differences between men and women.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413141
    Description:

    Prolonged periods of low earnings can limit an individual's capacity to cope with income losses or unexpected expenses, and makes economic self-sufficiency difficult. The ability to escape low earnings is linked to a number of factors, including age, firm size, and changing jobs.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410113111
    Description:

    Many employers offer registered pension plans to their employees, but group registered retired saving plans (RRSPs) are becoming more common. This product looks at how well full-time permanent employees in the private sector in 2001 understood their retirement pension plan coverage.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046806
    Description:

    This article examines the entry of women into the paid labour force, their continued concentration in certain kinds of employment and the increasing tendency for men to do the kinds of jobs traditionally performed by women.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013101
    Description:

    This paper looks at 'non-standard,' 'contingent' and 'precarious' employment situations, which differ from the traditional model of a stable, full-time job.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025072
    Description:

    This article examines available empirical evidence about Canada's "brain drain" - the loss of knowledge workers to the United States. It also looks at Canada's "brain gain" - the acquisition of knowledge workers from the rest of the world. (Adapted from an article in the Spring 2000 issue of Education Quarterly Review).

    Release date: 2000-06-07

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Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713233
    Description:

    Workers at the low end of the earnings scale, workers with less education, non-unionized workers and women are all less likely than other workers to receive employer-sponsored training. But they are also less likely to decline it when it is offered. Within each of the first three categories, women lag behind men in receiving training. Controlling for various individual, job and workplace characteristics helps explain some of these persistent labour market differences between men and women.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413141
    Description:

    Prolonged periods of low earnings can limit an individual's capacity to cope with income losses or unexpected expenses, and makes economic self-sufficiency difficult. The ability to escape low earnings is linked to a number of factors, including age, firm size, and changing jobs.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410113111
    Description:

    Many employers offer registered pension plans to their employees, but group registered retired saving plans (RRSPs) are becoming more common. This product looks at how well full-time permanent employees in the private sector in 2001 understood their retirement pension plan coverage.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046806
    Description:

    This article examines the entry of women into the paid labour force, their continued concentration in certain kinds of employment and the increasing tendency for men to do the kinds of jobs traditionally performed by women.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013101
    Description:

    This paper looks at 'non-standard,' 'contingent' and 'precarious' employment situations, which differ from the traditional model of a stable, full-time job.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025072
    Description:

    This article examines available empirical evidence about Canada's "brain drain" - the loss of knowledge workers to the United States. It also looks at Canada's "brain gain" - the acquisition of knowledge workers from the rest of the world. (Adapted from an article in the Spring 2000 issue of Education Quarterly Review).

    Release date: 2000-06-07

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