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All (861)

All (861) (25 of 861 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    There is only a small body of international literature and little Canadian evidence related to exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018012
    Description:

    This study investigates the extent to which income tax reassessments and delayed tax filing affect the reliability of Canadian administrative tax datasets used for economic analysis. The study is based on individual income tax records from the T1 Personal Master File and Historical Personal Master File for selected years from 1990 to 2010. These datasets contain tax records for approximately 100% of initial and all income tax filers, who submitted returns to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) before specific processing cut-off dates.

    Release date: 2018-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154898
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine job vacancies for entry-level positions (job vacancies that require no work experience) from the employer perspective. The JVWS provides answers to the following questions: How many entry-level job vacancies are available? What are their characteristics? Which occupations offer entry-level positions? Are some education groups more affected than others?

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017038
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic looks at Canadians’ average commute time, how they get to work, as well as the average commute time for those living in Canada’s largest census metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017037
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic looks at occupations with lower and higher median age, and the proportion of women employed in various occupations.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017036
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic provides a portrait of education in Canada, including the educational attainment of the working-age population as well as highlights on Aboriginal peoples and where newcomers to Canada are completing their education. The infographic also looks at fields of study and the earnings of Canadians at different levels of education.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017400
    Description:

    Despite a large literature estimating the effects of income taxation on the labour decisions of young and middle-aged workers, little is known about the extent to which older workers respond to changes in their income taxes. This paper explores this unresolved empirical issue, using longitudinal administrative data on more than one million individuals from Canada and exploiting a recent tax reform in the empirical identification strategy that explicitly targeted older couples. The findings offer new insight into the “black box” of intra-household labour supply and inform the optimal designs of income tax and retirement income systems.

    Release date: 2017-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017076
    Description:

    Despite a long-standing interest in labour mobility among researchers and policy makers, relatively little has been known about the barriers impeding the mobility of unemployed Canadians. Using data from the 2016 General Social Survey, this study informs this discussion. It provides, for the first time in Canada, representative survey-based information on barriers to labour mobility collected directly from unemployed individuals aged 15 to 64 who were not students.

    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017010
    Description:

    Using an employer–employee matched dataset of administrative tax records on most Canadian firms and the full populations of their workers, this paper documents relationships between firm size, industry, and the typical ages of firms’ workforces. In particular, the paper considers both differences in levels for the calendar years 2003 to 2010 inclusive, as well as changes in the age composition of firms’ workforces over this time as observed in a longitudinal analysis.

    Release date: 2017-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154878
    Description:

    This study provides additional insight into labour demand and supply based on the joint availability of job vacancy and unemployment data over the past two years (2015 and 2016). Specifically, it uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) and Labour Force Survey (LFS) to answer the following questions: To what extent are job vacancies and unemployment related? What can the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio tell us? To what extent do occupations differ in their relative degree of being slack (more workers than jobs) or tight (more jobs than workers)? How does the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio differ by education level?

    Release date: 2017-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017397
    Description:

    Rates of low income among immigrants continue to be high relative to the Canadian-born population. This paper examines the rate of chronic low income among immigrants aged 25 or older in Canada during the 2000s. Chronic low income is defined as having a family income under a low income cut-off for five consecutive years or more. A regionally adjusted low-income measure is used for the analysis.

    Release date: 2017-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017009
    Description:

    This document describes the procedures for using linked administrative data sources to estimate paid parental leave rates in Canada and the issues surrounding this use.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2017004
    Description:

    This month’s edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at labour force participation, unemployment, full-time and part-time work, and real wages for young workers in Canada from 1946 to 2015.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017073
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides Canadian evidence of recent changes in intergenerational income mobility in Canada. The study uses a unique Canadian database that directly links children and parents. The analysis focuses on absolute income mobility—often seen as an indicator of economic opportunity in a society.

    Release date: 2017-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on key changes in the Canadian economic data since oil prices began to decline in mid-2014. The presentation highlights recent trends related to economic growth and labour market conditions, the impact of lower oil prices in current dollar terms and in volume terms, and the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on merchandise trade and manufacturing.

    This presentation complements the release of Recent Developments in the Canadian Economy: Spring 2017. The graphs are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7th, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2017001
    Description:

    This report provides an up-to-date overview of the labour market involvement of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in Canada's ten provinces during and after the 2008/2009 economic downturn, as compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Using annual averages from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), covering the period of 2007 to 2015, the main focus is on Aboriginal people in the core working ages (25 to 54 years), although youth (aged 15 to 24 years) and older adults (aged 55 years and older) are considered separately. In addition to Aboriginal group, labour market indicators are distinguished by gender, geography (province/region of residence), education, lone parenthood, and marital status. The distribution of work characteristics (e.g., self-employment, sector of employment, usual work hours, wages, job tenure, industry, and occupation) by Aboriginal group are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

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Analysis (861)

Analysis (861) (25 of 861 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    There is only a small body of international literature and little Canadian evidence related to exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018012
    Description:

    This study investigates the extent to which income tax reassessments and delayed tax filing affect the reliability of Canadian administrative tax datasets used for economic analysis. The study is based on individual income tax records from the T1 Personal Master File and Historical Personal Master File for selected years from 1990 to 2010. These datasets contain tax records for approximately 100% of initial and all income tax filers, who submitted returns to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) before specific processing cut-off dates.

    Release date: 2018-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154898
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine job vacancies for entry-level positions (job vacancies that require no work experience) from the employer perspective. The JVWS provides answers to the following questions: How many entry-level job vacancies are available? What are their characteristics? Which occupations offer entry-level positions? Are some education groups more affected than others?

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017038
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic looks at Canadians’ average commute time, how they get to work, as well as the average commute time for those living in Canada’s largest census metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017037
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic looks at occupations with lower and higher median age, and the proportion of women employed in various occupations.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017036
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic provides a portrait of education in Canada, including the educational attainment of the working-age population as well as highlights on Aboriginal peoples and where newcomers to Canada are completing their education. The infographic also looks at fields of study and the earnings of Canadians at different levels of education.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017400
    Description:

    Despite a large literature estimating the effects of income taxation on the labour decisions of young and middle-aged workers, little is known about the extent to which older workers respond to changes in their income taxes. This paper explores this unresolved empirical issue, using longitudinal administrative data on more than one million individuals from Canada and exploiting a recent tax reform in the empirical identification strategy that explicitly targeted older couples. The findings offer new insight into the “black box” of intra-household labour supply and inform the optimal designs of income tax and retirement income systems.

    Release date: 2017-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017076
    Description:

    Despite a long-standing interest in labour mobility among researchers and policy makers, relatively little has been known about the barriers impeding the mobility of unemployed Canadians. Using data from the 2016 General Social Survey, this study informs this discussion. It provides, for the first time in Canada, representative survey-based information on barriers to labour mobility collected directly from unemployed individuals aged 15 to 64 who were not students.

    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017010
    Description:

    Using an employer–employee matched dataset of administrative tax records on most Canadian firms and the full populations of their workers, this paper documents relationships between firm size, industry, and the typical ages of firms’ workforces. In particular, the paper considers both differences in levels for the calendar years 2003 to 2010 inclusive, as well as changes in the age composition of firms’ workforces over this time as observed in a longitudinal analysis.

    Release date: 2017-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154878
    Description:

    This study provides additional insight into labour demand and supply based on the joint availability of job vacancy and unemployment data over the past two years (2015 and 2016). Specifically, it uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) and Labour Force Survey (LFS) to answer the following questions: To what extent are job vacancies and unemployment related? What can the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio tell us? To what extent do occupations differ in their relative degree of being slack (more workers than jobs) or tight (more jobs than workers)? How does the unemployment-to-job-vacancy ratio differ by education level?

    Release date: 2017-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017397
    Description:

    Rates of low income among immigrants continue to be high relative to the Canadian-born population. This paper examines the rate of chronic low income among immigrants aged 25 or older in Canada during the 2000s. Chronic low income is defined as having a family income under a low income cut-off for five consecutive years or more. A regionally adjusted low-income measure is used for the analysis.

    Release date: 2017-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017009
    Description:

    This document describes the procedures for using linked administrative data sources to estimate paid parental leave rates in Canada and the issues surrounding this use.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2017004
    Description:

    This month’s edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at labour force participation, unemployment, full-time and part-time work, and real wages for young workers in Canada from 1946 to 2015.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017073
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides Canadian evidence of recent changes in intergenerational income mobility in Canada. The study uses a unique Canadian database that directly links children and parents. The analysis focuses on absolute income mobility—often seen as an indicator of economic opportunity in a society.

    Release date: 2017-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on key changes in the Canadian economic data since oil prices began to decline in mid-2014. The presentation highlights recent trends related to economic growth and labour market conditions, the impact of lower oil prices in current dollar terms and in volume terms, and the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on merchandise trade and manufacturing.

    This presentation complements the release of Recent Developments in the Canadian Economy: Spring 2017. The graphs are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7th, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2017001
    Description:

    This report provides an up-to-date overview of the labour market involvement of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in Canada's ten provinces during and after the 2008/2009 economic downturn, as compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Using annual averages from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), covering the period of 2007 to 2015, the main focus is on Aboriginal people in the core working ages (25 to 54 years), although youth (aged 15 to 24 years) and older adults (aged 55 years and older) are considered separately. In addition to Aboriginal group, labour market indicators are distinguished by gender, geography (province/region of residence), education, lone parenthood, and marital status. The distribution of work characteristics (e.g., self-employment, sector of employment, usual work hours, wages, job tenure, industry, and occupation) by Aboriginal group are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

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