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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5080
    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4439
    Release date: 2006-11-03

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5087
    Release date: 2006-06-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5085
    Release date: 2006-06-21

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006001
    Description:

    A Preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the sample for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). For the majority of the longitudinal respondents, this occurs when a new panel is introduced and the preliminary information is collected during the first Labour interview. However, all persons living with a longitudinal respondent are also interviewed for SLID. Thus Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first Labour interview after they join the household. Longitudinal persons who have turned 16 while their household is in the SLID sample are then eligible for SLID interviews so they are asked the Preliminary interview questions during their first Labour interview.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2005 Preliminary questionnaire (for the 2004 reference year).

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006003
    Description:

    The Survey of Income and Labour Dynamics (SLID) interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire.

    In previous years, SLID conducted a Labour interview each January and a separate Income interview in May. In 2005 (reference year 2004) the two interviews were combined and collected in one interview in January.

    A labour and income interview is collected for all respondents 16 years of age and over. Respondents have the option of answering income questions during the interview, or of giving Statistics Canada permission to use their income tax records.

    In January 2005, data was collected for reference year 2004 from panels 3 and 4. Panel 3, in its sixth and final year, consisted of approximately 17,000 households and panel 4, in its third year, also consisted of approximately 17,000 households.

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2005 Labour and Income interview (for the 2004 reference year) including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006002
    Description:

    In previous years, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducted a Labour interview each January and a separate Income interview in May. In 2005 (reference year 2004) the two interviews were combined and collected in one interview in January.

    The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing. Thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for Labour and Income are documented in other SLID research papers. This document presents the information for the 2005 Entry Exit portion of the Labour Income interview (for the 2004 reference year).

    The Entry Exit Component consists of five separate modules. The Entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in Entry, the Demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the Relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The Exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the Tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2006-03-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2006003
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2006. Some of these modifications include changes to the population estimates, improvements to the public and private sector estimates and historical updates to several small Census Agglomerations (CA).

    Release date: 2006-01-25

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005007
    Description:

    Every January, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire.

    A labour interview is collected for all respondents 16 years of age and over. In January, 2004 data was collected for reference year 2003 from panels 3 and 4. Panel 3, in its fifth year, consisted of approximately 17,000 households and panel 4, in its second year, also consisted of approximately 17,000 households.

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2004 Labour interview (for the 2003 reference year) including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2005-06-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005008
    Description:

    In May 2004 the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) collected data on income from both its third and fourth panels. Panel 3 was in its fifth year of collection and panel 4 was in its second year.

    Respondents had the option of answering income questions in an interview, or of giving permission to Statistics Canada to allow SLID to use the information on their income tax return.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2004 Income questionnaire (for the 2003 reference year).

    Release date: 2005-06-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005006
    Description:

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the sample for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). For the majority of the longitudinal respondents, this occurs when a new panel is introduced and the preliminary information is collected during the first Labour interview. However, all persons living with a longitudinal respondent are also interviewed for SLID. Thus Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first Labour interview after they join the household. Longitudinal persons who have turned 16 while their household is in the SLID sample are then eligible for SLID interviews so they are asked the Preliminary interview questions during their first Labour interview.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2004 Preliminary questionnaire (for the 2003 reference year).

    Release date: 2005-06-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005005
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts two annual interviews: the Labour interview in January and the Income interview in May. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing. Thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for Labour and Income are documented in other SLID research papers. This document presents the information for the 2004 Entry Exit portion of the Labour and the Income interviews (for the 2003 reference year).

    The Entry Exit Component consists of five separate modules. The Entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update household composition and place of residence. For each person identified in Entry, the Demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the Relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. Relationship data is not collected in the May Income interview. The Exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the Tracing module is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2005-06-16

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005008
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D. In this report we shall present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2005002
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2005. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2001 Census, updates to industry and occupation classification systems and sample redesign changes.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Index and guides: 92-397-X
    Description:

    This report covers concepts and definitions, the imputation method and data quality for this variable. The 2001 Census collected information on three types of unpaid work performed during the week preceding the Census: looking after children, housework and caring for seniors. The 2001 data on unpaid work are compared with the 1996 Census data and with the data from the General Social Survey (use of time in 1998). The report also includes historical tables.

    Release date: 2005-01-11

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007451
    Description:

    Our social contacts and networks influence many aspects of our lives. Both workers and employers use "social networks" in various ways. Information from personal and professional contacts may lead to a better "match" between a worker and a job than do hirings through purely formal means without access to information from personal contacts. This improved match may also lead to better job outcomes. Social networks could also been seen to be limiting or exclusive of some workers. This presentation discusses findings from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics on the use of personal and professional networks in obtaining work. Who uses social networks to find work? What types of work are obtained? Is there a relationship between the use of personal or professional contacts and job outcomes? These are questions of interest for workers, employers and professionals in human resources and employment services.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007458
    Description:

    This paper examines whether permanent layoff rates have increased in Canada between the 1980s and the 1990s, using data from the Longitudinal Worker File - a 10% random sample of all Canadian employees.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5048
    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004009
    Description:

    This study profiles full-time, full-year Canadian workers with low weekly earnings in their main job in 1996, and examines their upward mobility in 2001 using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics.

    Release date: 2004-08-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5062
    Release date: 2004-08-30

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004071
    Description:

    This paper looks at non-farm trends for rural women using data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Index and guides: 92-388-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information to help users interpret and make use of census occupation data. It gives an overview of the collection, coding (to the 2001 National Occupational Classification), edit and imputation of the occupation data from the 2001 Census. The report describes procedural changes between the 2001 and earlier censuses, and provides an analysis of the quality level of the 2001 Census occupation data. Finally, it details the revision of the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification used in the 1991 and 1996 Censuses to the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics used in 2001. The historical comparability of data coded to the two classifications is discussed. Appendices to the report include a table showing historical data for the 1991, 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

    Release date: 2004-07-15

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