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All (40)

All (40) (25 of 40 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1993002
    Description:

    The paper provides question wording, lays out the possible responses, and maps out the flow of the questions for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview questionnaire.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1993004
    Description:

    This paper provides a description of the data collection procedures and the question wordings for the income and wealth portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), as well as some rationale for the chosen direction.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1993014
    Description:

    This paper presents the results from test 3A of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), conducted in January 1993, with a view to identify any necessary changes to the questions or to the algorithm used to derive labour force status.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1994004
    Description:

    This report describes major expected uses for the data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1994005
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure and detailed content of the first labour interview questionnaire for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1995010
    Description:

    This paper provides a graphical description of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) information.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1995013
    Description:

    This paper describes the empirical data that will be available from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) to help explain the choices women make in balancing home, family and work aspects of their lives.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995083
    Description:

    This paper examines the robustness of a measure of the average complete duration of unemployment in Canada to a host of assumptions used in its derivation. In contrast to the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is a lagging cyclical indicator, this statistic is a coincident indicator of the business cycle. The impact of using a steady state as opposed to a non steady state assumption, as well as the impact of various corrections for response bias are explored. It is concluded that a non steady state estimator would be a valuable compliment to the statistics on unemployment duration that are currently released by many statistical agencies, and particularly Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995084
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to introduce in a new measure of the average duration of unemployment spells using Canadian data. The paper summarizes the work of Corak (1993) and Corak and Heisz (1994) on the average complete duration of unemployment in a non-technical way by focusing on the distinction between it and the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is regularly released by Statistics Canada. It is pointed out that the latter is a lagging cyclical indicator. The average complete duration of unemployment is a more accurate indicator of prevailing labour market conditions, but some assumptions required in its derivation also imply that it lags actual developments.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Public use microdata: 71M0008X
    Description:

    The objectives of this survey were:- to estimate the hours of work that could be made available by a voluntary reduction in work-time by employed labour force participants, excluding the self-employed;- to determine whether those who voluntarily reduce their work-time would use their extra time in activities that would have an indirect impact on the availability of employment;- to determine which is the primary factor of interest in reducing work-time: dissatisfaction with own work, the weight of responsibilities or the attractiveness of other activities;- to determine preferences for various reduced work-time patterns (ie. shorter work day, shorter work week, or work fewer years);- to determine what regional, occupational, income or other demographic characteristics are associated with preferences for increased work-time.

    Release date: 1995-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042457
    Description:

    One of the most radical changes in Canadian society in the past 30 years has been the growth of dual-earner husband-wife families. Using the most recent data on families with employment income, this article examines couples in which wives earn more than their husbands, to see how they differ from the majority of working husband-wife families (those in which the husband is the main breadwinner).

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042459
    Description:

    Although most employed Canadians still work in one full-time, permanent paid job, various forms of non-standard work have become more common. In 1994, the General Social Survey collected data on a variety of forms of non-standard work arrangements, updating information gathered in 1989. This study uses data from both years to analyze the growth and changes in the distribution of non-standard work.

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995086
    Description:

    This study examines the factors influencing a firm's decision to train, using data taken from several recent Statistic Canada surveys that explore advanced technology use by Canadian manufacturing plants. Advanced technology adoption has been both rapid and pervasive, leading to concerns about whether technology use is associated with an increase or a decrease in workers' skills. Based on the data collected through two surveys, this paper examines the relationship between technology use and the skill level of workers. It does so by first reporting on the opinions of managers of Canadian manufacturing establishments, who indicate that technology use leads to skill increases. Second, this paper examines the relationship between a plant's decision to train and certain other characteristics of the plant, including its technology use. Third, it investigates the factors related to the location of training in order to determine whether the training done by plants imparts primarily generic skills or plant-specific skills. Finally, it reports on survey results that show plants that introduced new technologies had to increase their expenditures for training.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Public use microdata: 89M0004X
    Description:

    The objective of this survey was to determine:- how the work patterns of pregnant women have been affected;- how adequate the income support systems for women are (private and public) both before and after the birth of their child;- have these women experienced any difficulties in returning to work afterwards?- for women who have not returned to the workforce, what are the reasons for their choice?

    Release date: 1995-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031641
    Description:

    In 1994, for the first time in four years, employers expanded their workforces significantly. A look at recent changes in paid employment, earnings and hours across detailed industries.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031636
    Description:

    Since the late seventies, 25 to 29 year-olds with only a secondary school education have had more difficulty finding employment, and much more difficulty obtaining well-paid work. A glance at the changes over time in the labour market "success" of 25 to 29 year-old secondary school graduates.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031640
    Description:

    Starting in 1991, the participation rate of women has declined and shows no sign of resuming its long-standing upward trend. This note explores the rates of adult women aged 25 to 54 by different characteristics.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031639
    Description:

    Has the economy lost its capacity to generate enough full-time full-year employment to keep up with the growth in the working-age population? This article examines full-time and full-year employment rates by province from 1983 to 1993.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995079
    Description:

    The key hypothesis of this paper is that time use data bases make possible a broader view of the benefits and costs of human capital than is otherwise possible. This achievement is enabled by a set of integrated information on not only educational attainment but also on time devoted to formal and informal study, to paid and unpaid work of economic value, to work of civic value, to leisure activities, and to the educating of children by parents. It is argued that such information is central to human capital theory, though much of it, especially on the leisure costs of investment in human capital, has been hitherto ignored. This new information is important because it can be used to inform the debate over the key issues in this field -- for example, the value of increased public support to formal education -- by measuring previously overlooked aspects of the benefits and costs of investment in human capital.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995080
    Description:

    Inequality in weekly earnings increased in the eighties in Canada. The growth in inequality occurred in conjunction with three facts. First, real hourly wages of young workers dropped more than 10%. Second, the percentage of employees working 35-40 hours per week in their main job fell and the fraction of employees working 50 hours or more per week rose. Third, there was a growing tendency for highly paid workers to work long workweeks. We argue that any set of explanations of the increase in weekly earnings inequality must reconcile these three facts. Sectoral changes in the distribution of employment by industry and union status explain roughly 30% of the rise in inequality. The reduction in real minimum wages and the decline of average firm size explain very little of the growth in age-earnings differentials. Skill-biased technological change could have increased both the dispersion of hourly wages and the dispersion of weekly hours of work and thus, is consistent a priori with the movements observed. Yet other factors may have played an equally important - if not more important - role. The growth in competitive pressures, possible shifts in the bargaining power (between firms and labour) towards firms, the greater locational mobility of firms, the increase in Canada's openness to international trade, the rise in fixed costs of labour and possibly in training costs may be major factors behind the growth in weekly earnings inequality in Canada.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Table: 71F0005X
    Description:

    The document contains summary results of a household survey, conducted in 1994, on the human, social and economic impact of departures from federal government jobs in the National Capital Region in 1991 and 1992.

    SDDS Survey ID Number:4410

    Survey Title:Tracking Study of Federal Employees

    Release date: 1995-07-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Public use microdata: 87M0008X
    Description:

    This survey collected information on the distance travelled from main residence to place of work as well as the mode of transportation.

    Release date: 1995-06-08

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Public use microdata: 71M0008X
    Description:

    The objectives of this survey were:- to estimate the hours of work that could be made available by a voluntary reduction in work-time by employed labour force participants, excluding the self-employed;- to determine whether those who voluntarily reduce their work-time would use their extra time in activities that would have an indirect impact on the availability of employment;- to determine which is the primary factor of interest in reducing work-time: dissatisfaction with own work, the weight of responsibilities or the attractiveness of other activities;- to determine preferences for various reduced work-time patterns (ie. shorter work day, shorter work week, or work fewer years);- to determine what regional, occupational, income or other demographic characteristics are associated with preferences for increased work-time.

    Release date: 1995-12-21

  • Public use microdata: 89M0004X
    Description:

    The objective of this survey was to determine:- how the work patterns of pregnant women have been affected;- how adequate the income support systems for women are (private and public) both before and after the birth of their child;- have these women experienced any difficulties in returning to work afterwards?- for women who have not returned to the workforce, what are the reasons for their choice?

    Release date: 1995-09-29

  • Table: 71F0005X
    Description:

    The document contains summary results of a household survey, conducted in 1994, on the human, social and economic impact of departures from federal government jobs in the National Capital Region in 1991 and 1992.

    SDDS Survey ID Number:4410

    Survey Title:Tracking Study of Federal Employees

    Release date: 1995-07-07

  • Public use microdata: 87M0008X
    Description:

    This survey collected information on the distance travelled from main residence to place of work as well as the mode of transportation.

    Release date: 1995-06-08

  • Public use microdata: 71M0006X
    Description:

    The purpose of this survey was to identify: the actual and the desired participation patterns of persons inactive due to labour market conditions or their own preferences; the type of work desired by such individuals; those persons who have become discouraged looking for work and believe that no suitable jobs were available; and those persons who were seriously interested in taking a job but who knew that jobs were not available in their community until some future time, due to seasonal or economic conditions.

    Release date: 1995-05-22

  • Public use microdata: 95M0007X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Individual File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Individuals CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-04-11

  • Public use microdata: 95M0008X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Households and Housing File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Households and Housing CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-03-31

Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (25 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995083
    Description:

    This paper examines the robustness of a measure of the average complete duration of unemployment in Canada to a host of assumptions used in its derivation. In contrast to the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is a lagging cyclical indicator, this statistic is a coincident indicator of the business cycle. The impact of using a steady state as opposed to a non steady state assumption, as well as the impact of various corrections for response bias are explored. It is concluded that a non steady state estimator would be a valuable compliment to the statistics on unemployment duration that are currently released by many statistical agencies, and particularly Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995084
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to introduce in a new measure of the average duration of unemployment spells using Canadian data. The paper summarizes the work of Corak (1993) and Corak and Heisz (1994) on the average complete duration of unemployment in a non-technical way by focusing on the distinction between it and the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is regularly released by Statistics Canada. It is pointed out that the latter is a lagging cyclical indicator. The average complete duration of unemployment is a more accurate indicator of prevailing labour market conditions, but some assumptions required in its derivation also imply that it lags actual developments.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042457
    Description:

    One of the most radical changes in Canadian society in the past 30 years has been the growth of dual-earner husband-wife families. Using the most recent data on families with employment income, this article examines couples in which wives earn more than their husbands, to see how they differ from the majority of working husband-wife families (those in which the husband is the main breadwinner).

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042459
    Description:

    Although most employed Canadians still work in one full-time, permanent paid job, various forms of non-standard work have become more common. In 1994, the General Social Survey collected data on a variety of forms of non-standard work arrangements, updating information gathered in 1989. This study uses data from both years to analyze the growth and changes in the distribution of non-standard work.

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995086
    Description:

    This study examines the factors influencing a firm's decision to train, using data taken from several recent Statistic Canada surveys that explore advanced technology use by Canadian manufacturing plants. Advanced technology adoption has been both rapid and pervasive, leading to concerns about whether technology use is associated with an increase or a decrease in workers' skills. Based on the data collected through two surveys, this paper examines the relationship between technology use and the skill level of workers. It does so by first reporting on the opinions of managers of Canadian manufacturing establishments, who indicate that technology use leads to skill increases. Second, this paper examines the relationship between a plant's decision to train and certain other characteristics of the plant, including its technology use. Third, it investigates the factors related to the location of training in order to determine whether the training done by plants imparts primarily generic skills or plant-specific skills. Finally, it reports on survey results that show plants that introduced new technologies had to increase their expenditures for training.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031641
    Description:

    In 1994, for the first time in four years, employers expanded their workforces significantly. A look at recent changes in paid employment, earnings and hours across detailed industries.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031636
    Description:

    Since the late seventies, 25 to 29 year-olds with only a secondary school education have had more difficulty finding employment, and much more difficulty obtaining well-paid work. A glance at the changes over time in the labour market "success" of 25 to 29 year-old secondary school graduates.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031640
    Description:

    Starting in 1991, the participation rate of women has declined and shows no sign of resuming its long-standing upward trend. This note explores the rates of adult women aged 25 to 54 by different characteristics.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031639
    Description:

    Has the economy lost its capacity to generate enough full-time full-year employment to keep up with the growth in the working-age population? This article examines full-time and full-year employment rates by province from 1983 to 1993.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995079
    Description:

    The key hypothesis of this paper is that time use data bases make possible a broader view of the benefits and costs of human capital than is otherwise possible. This achievement is enabled by a set of integrated information on not only educational attainment but also on time devoted to formal and informal study, to paid and unpaid work of economic value, to work of civic value, to leisure activities, and to the educating of children by parents. It is argued that such information is central to human capital theory, though much of it, especially on the leisure costs of investment in human capital, has been hitherto ignored. This new information is important because it can be used to inform the debate over the key issues in this field -- for example, the value of increased public support to formal education -- by measuring previously overlooked aspects of the benefits and costs of investment in human capital.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995080
    Description:

    Inequality in weekly earnings increased in the eighties in Canada. The growth in inequality occurred in conjunction with three facts. First, real hourly wages of young workers dropped more than 10%. Second, the percentage of employees working 35-40 hours per week in their main job fell and the fraction of employees working 50 hours or more per week rose. Third, there was a growing tendency for highly paid workers to work long workweeks. We argue that any set of explanations of the increase in weekly earnings inequality must reconcile these three facts. Sectoral changes in the distribution of employment by industry and union status explain roughly 30% of the rise in inequality. The reduction in real minimum wages and the decline of average firm size explain very little of the growth in age-earnings differentials. Skill-biased technological change could have increased both the dispersion of hourly wages and the dispersion of weekly hours of work and thus, is consistent a priori with the movements observed. Yet other factors may have played an equally important - if not more important - role. The growth in competitive pressures, possible shifts in the bargaining power (between firms and labour) towards firms, the greater locational mobility of firms, the increase in Canada's openness to international trade, the rise in fixed costs of labour and possibly in training costs may be major factors behind the growth in weekly earnings inequality in Canada.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021598
    Description:

    Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article takes a first national look at the work experience of people of different ages, fields of work and levels of education.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021601
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturers surveyed earlier this year reported some hiring problems. A glance at the type of labour shortages cited by small and large firms.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021591
    Description:

    How many combined weekly hours do dual-earner couples usually work? A discussion of the differing effects of the presence and age of children on the hours worked and a look at some characteristics of the spouses.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021600
    Description:

    Lack of sleep is not the only cause of daytime sleepiness; many other things can induce it, including excessive warmth, boredom, or performing a demanding but uninteresting task. This study measures tiredness based on respondent assessment of drowsiness during working hours.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 73-505-X
    Description:

    Many Canadians have come to frequently rely on unemployment insurance. To some important degree, this reflects the structure of jobs and the human resource decisions of firms. In particular, many employers tend to rely on temporary layoffs as a means of adjusting to periods of depressed sales. How should frequent use of unemployment insurance be interpreted? Does it arise from changes in worker behaviour in response to the availability and generosity of benefits? Or does it reflect broader forces associated with the availability of jobs and the structure of employment relations between workers and firms? Just what role do firms play in determining how the program is used? These are some of the questions addressed in this publication. It also contains a series of data appendices that document unemployment insurance benefits and taxes at a detailed industry level.

    Release date: 1995-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995077
    Description:

    Labour economists have developed elaborate theoretical models and conducted very advanced econometric analysis of the decision making of households. But this emphasis on the supply side of the labour market has not been matched by any corresponding degree of sophistication in empirical analysis of the demand side of the labour market. This has been due in part to the lack of appropriate data. This paper outlines why demand side data which outlines the behaviour of firms in the labour market is necessary for the advancement of labour market analysis. It also discusses the constraints which existing data collection methods impose on labour economics. The paper suggests types of data which might be collected, alternative methodologies for an establishment/worker survey, and discusses some of the theoretical and empirical difficulties that might be encountered in such an exercise.

    Release date: 1995-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995074
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of small and medium-sized firms that perform training. It uses data taken from a recent Statistics Canada survey that permit firms' training decisions to be analyzed within the broader context of their many activities and strategies.

    The study finds strong evidence for the hypothesis that human capital development facilitated by training is complementary to innovation and technological change. Training incidence is found to be closely related to the importance that a firm gives to research and development, the use of new technologies, and numerous other strategies that are related to innovation. Training is also greater where a firm emphasizes quality and a comprehensive human-resource strategy. The results point to the inherent complementarity of technology and human resources policy.

    Release date: 1995-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011776
    Description:

    The automotive industry comprises not only the manufacture or assembly of automotive parts and vehicles, but also the distribution, servicing and maintenance of the finished products. This article looks at the workforce involved in this important industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011777
    Description:

    During the last decade, time lost from work because of illness or disability declined, while days lost as a result of personal or family responsibilities increased. This study examines rates and levels by industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011781
    Description:

    A summary of the one-day Symposium on the Greying of the Workforce, which explored the myths and realities of the situation facing older workers, as well as the implications for the coming decades.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Reference (7)

Reference (7) (7 of 7 results)

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