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All (53) (25 of 53 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126036
    Description:

    The issue of male-female wage inequality is complex, and requires analysis from a number of different perspectives. This article demonstrates the importance of measurement, decomposition techniques and differences in the gap along the wage scale.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115980
    Description:

    Most analyses of part-time work naturally focus on employed persons, but the Labour Force Survey also asks the unemployed whether they are seeking a full- or part-time job. This article looks at trends in job seeking between 1976 and 2000, and the contribution of demographic and other factors to changes in the overall shares of the two groups of seekers.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001180
    Description:

    This study examines provincial differences in productivity (GDP per job) using decomposition and regression analysis. In the first stage of the study, the relative size of productivity differences across provinces is examined. Then, these differences are decomposed into two components - the first is the portion of the difference that arises from industry-mix, and the second is due to "real" productivity differences at the industry level. The paper also examines the contributions of the "new" and "old" economy sectors to differences in provincial productivity. Finally, regression analysis is performed in order to determine the statistical significance of interprovincial productivity differences. The paper finds that British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Quebec do not differ significantly from another in terms of GDP per job after differences in industry mix are considered. Manitoba and the Atlantic Provinces lag behind the others. Most of the difference in the latter two cases stems from "real" differences at the industry level rather than from the effect of differences in industry mix. The Natural Resources sector plays an important role in bolstering the performance of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001169
    Description:

    This paper documents the changing geography of the Canadian manufacturing sector over a twenty-two year period (1976-1997). It does so by looking at the shifts in employment, as well as other measures of industrial change, across different levels of the rural/urban hierarchy - central cities, adjacent suburbs, medium and small cities, and rural areas.

    The analysis demonstrates that the most dramatic shifts in manufacturing employment were from the central cities of large metropolitan regions to their suburbs. Paralleling trends in the United States, rural regions of Canada have increased their share of manufacturing employment. Rising rural employment shares were due to declining employment shares of small cities and, to lesser degree, large urban regions. Increasing rural employment was particularly prominent in Quebec, where employment shifted away from the Montreal region. By way of contrast, Ontario's rural regions only maintained their share of employment and the Toronto region increased its share of provincial employment over the period. The changing fortunes of rural and urban areas was not the result of across-the-board shifts in manufacturing employment, but was the net outcome of differing locational patterns across industries.

    Change across the rural/urban hierarchy is also measured in terms of wage and productivity levels, diversity, and volatility. In contrast to the United States, wages and productivity in Canada do not consistently decline moving down the rural/urban hierarchy from the largest cities to the most rural parts of the country. Only after controlling for the types of manufacturing industries found in rural and urban regions is it apparent that wages and productivity decline with the size of place. The analysis also demonstrates that over time most rural and urban regions are diversifying across a wider variety of manufacturing industries and that shifts in employment shares across industries - a measure of economic instability - has for some rural/urban classifications increased modestly.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001177
    Description:

    Recent research has suggested that investment has shifted from urban areas to more rural locales. However, Canadian manufacturing remains predominantly an urban activity with more than 40% of manufacturing employment located in Canada's three largest urban regions. This paper examines the changing manufacturing landscapes of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and outlines the shifts in industry mix, employment, and wage levels that have taken place over the period between 1976 and 1997. The analysis uses a longitudinal plant-level database based upon the Annual Survey of Manufactures conducted by Statistics Canada.

    Toronto and Vancouver both experience growth in the manufacturing sector, while Montreal experiences decline driven by differences in their industrial structure. Manufacturing activity has increased in a number of sectors of Toronto's economy, but has been particularly influenced by the growing automotive sector that ties the city to a large North American market. Montreal has experienced declines across most of the manufacturing industries. A heavy concentration of employment in labour intensive industries such as textiles and clothing, which have experienced severe declines across Canada, has amplified the level of decline in Montreal. However, Montreal has seen some growth in science-based industries. While Vancouver's manufacturing economy is much smaller in absolute terms, maintaining slightly less than a 5% share of national manufacturing employment, it has exhibited higher levels of long-run growth and restructuring than its eastern counterparts.

    A second focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between economic volatility and diversity in the manufacturing sector using a number of statistical measures. Toronto and Montreal have diverse industrial structures, although each has become slightly more concentrated over the study period. In Montreal, this is due to the increasing importance of other industries, as the clothing and textiles industry declines. In Toronto, this can be attributed to the increased importance of the food and transportation equipment industries. Vancouver has become increasingly diversified over the study period, reflecting the growth and dynamism of this sector. The mature manufacturing economies of Toronto and Montreal exhibit lower levels of volatility than their western counterpart.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001002
    Description:

    This paper examines the job vacancy rate in Canada in order to estimate companies' hiring intentions and the future direction of labour demand. It uses data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES).

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001176
    Description:

    Since the Job Vacancy Survey conducted by Statistics Canada between 1971 and 1978, there is no data which directly measures job vacancies in Canada. Using data from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we attempt to fill this gap. We study the determinants of job vacancies at the location level. We find that workplaces with high vacancy rates consist of at least two types: 1) those employing a highly skilled workforce, innovating, adopting new technologies increasing skill requirements, facing significant international competition and operating in tight local labour markets, and 2) those which are non-unionized, operate in retail trade and consumer services industries and are not part of a multi-location firm. As a result, a substantial share of job vacancies are not in the high-technology sectors. More than 40% of all job vacancies and 50% of long-term vacancies originate from retail trade and consumer services industries.

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001163
    Description:

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical investigation of the effects of inter-provincial migration on individuals' earnings based on the newly available Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD). The main results are based on a difference model which estimates the effects of mobility on (log) earnings which implicitly controls for initial earnings levels and other fixed effects, as well as other influences captured by the regressors included in the models. Inter-provincial mobility is found to be associated with statistically significant and in many cases quantitatively substantial changes in individuals' earnings, with these effects varying by age, sex, and province of origin. Pre- and post-move earnings profiles are also analysed, offering support for the validity of the difference model approach and indicating that movers are quickly integrated into local labour markets after their moves. Implications are discussed and possible directions for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105962
    Description:

    A note on the effect of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington on the labour market in Canada, specifically absences from work and hours lost.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105960
    Description:

    This study looks at the results of permanent layoffs from full-time jobs. How long does it take laid-off workers to find a new job? What factors affect the length of joblessness? For those who are successful in finding a new job, what is the wage gap between the old job and the new one? What factors influence this wage gap?

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001175
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector experience occupational skill shortages, and to the extent that they do, whether these shortages appear to act as impediments to advanced technology adoption. Plants adopting advanced technology report shortages, particularly when it comes to professionals, such as scientists and engineers, and to technical specialists. Whether these shortages pose labour-market problems depends very much on the solutions adapted by the establishments experiencing the shortages. This paper finds that labour shortages did not appear to block technology adoption since those establishments that reported shortages were also the most technologically advanced. Although they faced a greater need for skilled labour, they were able to solve their shortages.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0033M
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is developing a body of knowledge on the nonprofit sector in Canada through the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project. The results of research studies are reported periodically in a series of brief reports posted on Statistics Canada's website. The findings will be of interest to those researching the voluntary sector or working in nonprofit organizations.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001036
    Description:

    This paper offers insights into the dynamics of services trade in an increasingly globalized economy, particularly with respect to Canada. It begins by describing the contribution of the services industries to Canada's output and employment, before offering a statistical review of trade in services for Canada and some other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813096
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001166
    Description:

    This study assesses two potential problems with respect to the reporting of Employment Insurance (EI) and Social Assistance (SA) benefits in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): (a) under-reporting of the monthly number of beneficiaries; and (b) a tendency to incorrectly report receiving benefits throughout the year, while in fact benefits may have been received only in certain months, leading to artificial spikes in the January starts and December terminations of benefit spells (seam effect). The results of the analysis show the following:

    (1) The rate of under-reporting of EI in SLID is about 15%. Although it varies by month (from 0% to 30%), it is fairly stable from year to year.

    (2) There are significant spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations of EI benefit spells. However, the spikes in January starts appear to represent a real phenomenon, rather than a seam problem. They mirror closely the pattern of establishment of new EI claims (the latter increase significantly in January as a result of the decline in employment following the Christmas peak demand). There are no corresponding statistics for EI claim terminations to assess the nature of December spikes.

    (3) The rate of under-reporting of SA in SLID is about 50%, significantly greater than for EI. The rate of under-reporting goes down to about 20% to 30%, if we assume that those who received SA, but did not report in which months they received benefits, received benefits throughout the year.

    (4) There are large spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations. As in the case of EI, the SA could reflect a real phenomenon. After all, SA starts and terminations are affected by labour market conditions, in the same way EI starts and terminations are affected. However, the SA spikes are much larger than the EI spikes, which increases the probability that, at least in part, are due to a seam effect.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001149
    Description:

    This paper extends earlier work by updating the structure and policy parameters of payroll taxes in Canada. Drawing from a newly available dataset, it also reports trends on the level, growth and role of each component of these taxes in recent years. Finally, it compares Canadian payroll taxes to those of the world's leading developed countries. The following highlights the main findings.

    Payroll taxes in Canada have grown considerably since the early 1980s, constituting an increasingly important source of revenues for both the federal and provincial governments. However, the rapid expansion observed in earlier years has in large part slowed down in the early 1990s. Payroll tax revenues collected from employees and employers in the country have stabilized at around 5.7% of GDP or 14.0% of total federal and provincial government revenues since 1992; the effective total payroll tax rate has levelled off at around $12.20 for every $100 of wages and salaries since 1994.

    The structure, level, growth, and role of each component of payroll taxes vary considerably from one province to another. Yet, EI premiums have remarkably been the largest component of these taxes in every province in both the 1980s and the 1990s, regardless of whether there are provincial payroll taxes; rising EI premiums have also consistently been the leading contributor to the expansion of total payroll taxes during this period.

    Despite rapid growth in the 1980s and early 1990s, Canadian payroll taxes remain one of the lowest in the world's major developed economies. According to data compiled by the OECD, total payroll tax revenues in Canada amounted to 6.0% of GDP in 1996 --- that is 14% lower than that of the United States (at 7.0% of GDP); the lowest in the G7 nations; and the 9th lowest among the 29 OECD member states.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001001
    Description:

    This report examines the results of the 1999 round of the Workplace and Employee Survey on the role that human resource practices play in facilitating workplace change. It focusses on practices such as workplace training, variable pay and employee involvement (job rotation, cross-training and teamwork), their association with change and whom they impact.

    Release date: 2001-09-06

  • Technical products: 71-586-X
    Description:

    This paper is a response to the requests of Canadian policy makers and researchers to develop a comprehensive index of total labour costs for the Canadian economy. This Labour Cost Index (LCI), which measures both wage and non-wage costs, would be free from the influence of employment shifts in industries and occupations.

    This paper provides a review of the U.S. Employment Cost Index (ECI). The paper describes the LCI in general terms and compares this measure of labour cost with some other Canadian labour market indicators. The paper lists some of the uses and limitations of labour cost index based on the experiences of some other countries with such an index. The paper outlines the proposed plans and micro data model to be tested to develop a Canadian LCI. The major milestones and development issues are summarized in the paper.

    Release date: 2001-08-24

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001051
    Description:

    This paper looks at the changing trends in paid and unpaid farm work as well as farmers reporting another professional activity.

    Release date: 2001-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015854
    Description:

    This paper looks at a range of estimators applicable to a regularly repeated household survey with controlled overlap between successive surveys. The paper shows how the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) based on a fixed window of time points can be improved by applying the technique of generalised regression. This improved estimator is compared to the AK estimator of Gurney and Daly (1965) and the modified regression estimator of Singh, Kennedy, Wu and Brisebois (1997), using data from the Australian Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001001
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of the producer services sector in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2001-07-04

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

Analysis (42)

Analysis (42) (25 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126036
    Description:

    The issue of male-female wage inequality is complex, and requires analysis from a number of different perspectives. This article demonstrates the importance of measurement, decomposition techniques and differences in the gap along the wage scale.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115980
    Description:

    Most analyses of part-time work naturally focus on employed persons, but the Labour Force Survey also asks the unemployed whether they are seeking a full- or part-time job. This article looks at trends in job seeking between 1976 and 2000, and the contribution of demographic and other factors to changes in the overall shares of the two groups of seekers.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001180
    Description:

    This study examines provincial differences in productivity (GDP per job) using decomposition and regression analysis. In the first stage of the study, the relative size of productivity differences across provinces is examined. Then, these differences are decomposed into two components - the first is the portion of the difference that arises from industry-mix, and the second is due to "real" productivity differences at the industry level. The paper also examines the contributions of the "new" and "old" economy sectors to differences in provincial productivity. Finally, regression analysis is performed in order to determine the statistical significance of interprovincial productivity differences. The paper finds that British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Quebec do not differ significantly from another in terms of GDP per job after differences in industry mix are considered. Manitoba and the Atlantic Provinces lag behind the others. Most of the difference in the latter two cases stems from "real" differences at the industry level rather than from the effect of differences in industry mix. The Natural Resources sector plays an important role in bolstering the performance of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001169
    Description:

    This paper documents the changing geography of the Canadian manufacturing sector over a twenty-two year period (1976-1997). It does so by looking at the shifts in employment, as well as other measures of industrial change, across different levels of the rural/urban hierarchy - central cities, adjacent suburbs, medium and small cities, and rural areas.

    The analysis demonstrates that the most dramatic shifts in manufacturing employment were from the central cities of large metropolitan regions to their suburbs. Paralleling trends in the United States, rural regions of Canada have increased their share of manufacturing employment. Rising rural employment shares were due to declining employment shares of small cities and, to lesser degree, large urban regions. Increasing rural employment was particularly prominent in Quebec, where employment shifted away from the Montreal region. By way of contrast, Ontario's rural regions only maintained their share of employment and the Toronto region increased its share of provincial employment over the period. The changing fortunes of rural and urban areas was not the result of across-the-board shifts in manufacturing employment, but was the net outcome of differing locational patterns across industries.

    Change across the rural/urban hierarchy is also measured in terms of wage and productivity levels, diversity, and volatility. In contrast to the United States, wages and productivity in Canada do not consistently decline moving down the rural/urban hierarchy from the largest cities to the most rural parts of the country. Only after controlling for the types of manufacturing industries found in rural and urban regions is it apparent that wages and productivity decline with the size of place. The analysis also demonstrates that over time most rural and urban regions are diversifying across a wider variety of manufacturing industries and that shifts in employment shares across industries - a measure of economic instability - has for some rural/urban classifications increased modestly.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001177
    Description:

    Recent research has suggested that investment has shifted from urban areas to more rural locales. However, Canadian manufacturing remains predominantly an urban activity with more than 40% of manufacturing employment located in Canada's three largest urban regions. This paper examines the changing manufacturing landscapes of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and outlines the shifts in industry mix, employment, and wage levels that have taken place over the period between 1976 and 1997. The analysis uses a longitudinal plant-level database based upon the Annual Survey of Manufactures conducted by Statistics Canada.

    Toronto and Vancouver both experience growth in the manufacturing sector, while Montreal experiences decline driven by differences in their industrial structure. Manufacturing activity has increased in a number of sectors of Toronto's economy, but has been particularly influenced by the growing automotive sector that ties the city to a large North American market. Montreal has experienced declines across most of the manufacturing industries. A heavy concentration of employment in labour intensive industries such as textiles and clothing, which have experienced severe declines across Canada, has amplified the level of decline in Montreal. However, Montreal has seen some growth in science-based industries. While Vancouver's manufacturing economy is much smaller in absolute terms, maintaining slightly less than a 5% share of national manufacturing employment, it has exhibited higher levels of long-run growth and restructuring than its eastern counterparts.

    A second focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between economic volatility and diversity in the manufacturing sector using a number of statistical measures. Toronto and Montreal have diverse industrial structures, although each has become slightly more concentrated over the study period. In Montreal, this is due to the increasing importance of other industries, as the clothing and textiles industry declines. In Toronto, this can be attributed to the increased importance of the food and transportation equipment industries. Vancouver has become increasingly diversified over the study period, reflecting the growth and dynamism of this sector. The mature manufacturing economies of Toronto and Montreal exhibit lower levels of volatility than their western counterpart.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001002
    Description:

    This paper examines the job vacancy rate in Canada in order to estimate companies' hiring intentions and the future direction of labour demand. It uses data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES).

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001176
    Description:

    Since the Job Vacancy Survey conducted by Statistics Canada between 1971 and 1978, there is no data which directly measures job vacancies in Canada. Using data from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we attempt to fill this gap. We study the determinants of job vacancies at the location level. We find that workplaces with high vacancy rates consist of at least two types: 1) those employing a highly skilled workforce, innovating, adopting new technologies increasing skill requirements, facing significant international competition and operating in tight local labour markets, and 2) those which are non-unionized, operate in retail trade and consumer services industries and are not part of a multi-location firm. As a result, a substantial share of job vacancies are not in the high-technology sectors. More than 40% of all job vacancies and 50% of long-term vacancies originate from retail trade and consumer services industries.

    Release date: 2001-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001163
    Description:

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical investigation of the effects of inter-provincial migration on individuals' earnings based on the newly available Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD). The main results are based on a difference model which estimates the effects of mobility on (log) earnings which implicitly controls for initial earnings levels and other fixed effects, as well as other influences captured by the regressors included in the models. Inter-provincial mobility is found to be associated with statistically significant and in many cases quantitatively substantial changes in individuals' earnings, with these effects varying by age, sex, and province of origin. Pre- and post-move earnings profiles are also analysed, offering support for the validity of the difference model approach and indicating that movers are quickly integrated into local labour markets after their moves. Implications are discussed and possible directions for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105962
    Description:

    A note on the effect of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington on the labour market in Canada, specifically absences from work and hours lost.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105960
    Description:

    This study looks at the results of permanent layoffs from full-time jobs. How long does it take laid-off workers to find a new job? What factors affect the length of joblessness? For those who are successful in finding a new job, what is the wage gap between the old job and the new one? What factors influence this wage gap?

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001175
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector experience occupational skill shortages, and to the extent that they do, whether these shortages appear to act as impediments to advanced technology adoption. Plants adopting advanced technology report shortages, particularly when it comes to professionals, such as scientists and engineers, and to technical specialists. Whether these shortages pose labour-market problems depends very much on the solutions adapted by the establishments experiencing the shortages. This paper finds that labour shortages did not appear to block technology adoption since those establishments that reported shortages were also the most technologically advanced. Although they faced a greater need for skilled labour, they were able to solve their shortages.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0033M
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is developing a body of knowledge on the nonprofit sector in Canada through the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project. The results of research studies are reported periodically in a series of brief reports posted on Statistics Canada's website. The findings will be of interest to those researching the voluntary sector or working in nonprofit organizations.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001036
    Description:

    This paper offers insights into the dynamics of services trade in an increasingly globalized economy, particularly with respect to Canada. It begins by describing the contribution of the services industries to Canada's output and employment, before offering a statistical review of trade in services for Canada and some other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813096
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001166
    Description:

    This study assesses two potential problems with respect to the reporting of Employment Insurance (EI) and Social Assistance (SA) benefits in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): (a) under-reporting of the monthly number of beneficiaries; and (b) a tendency to incorrectly report receiving benefits throughout the year, while in fact benefits may have been received only in certain months, leading to artificial spikes in the January starts and December terminations of benefit spells (seam effect). The results of the analysis show the following:

    (1) The rate of under-reporting of EI in SLID is about 15%. Although it varies by month (from 0% to 30%), it is fairly stable from year to year.

    (2) There are significant spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations of EI benefit spells. However, the spikes in January starts appear to represent a real phenomenon, rather than a seam problem. They mirror closely the pattern of establishment of new EI claims (the latter increase significantly in January as a result of the decline in employment following the Christmas peak demand). There are no corresponding statistics for EI claim terminations to assess the nature of December spikes.

    (3) The rate of under-reporting of SA in SLID is about 50%, significantly greater than for EI. The rate of under-reporting goes down to about 20% to 30%, if we assume that those who received SA, but did not report in which months they received benefits, received benefits throughout the year.

    (4) There are large spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations. As in the case of EI, the SA could reflect a real phenomenon. After all, SA starts and terminations are affected by labour market conditions, in the same way EI starts and terminations are affected. However, the SA spikes are much larger than the EI spikes, which increases the probability that, at least in part, are due to a seam effect.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001149
    Description:

    This paper extends earlier work by updating the structure and policy parameters of payroll taxes in Canada. Drawing from a newly available dataset, it also reports trends on the level, growth and role of each component of these taxes in recent years. Finally, it compares Canadian payroll taxes to those of the world's leading developed countries. The following highlights the main findings.

    Payroll taxes in Canada have grown considerably since the early 1980s, constituting an increasingly important source of revenues for both the federal and provincial governments. However, the rapid expansion observed in earlier years has in large part slowed down in the early 1990s. Payroll tax revenues collected from employees and employers in the country have stabilized at around 5.7% of GDP or 14.0% of total federal and provincial government revenues since 1992; the effective total payroll tax rate has levelled off at around $12.20 for every $100 of wages and salaries since 1994.

    The structure, level, growth, and role of each component of payroll taxes vary considerably from one province to another. Yet, EI premiums have remarkably been the largest component of these taxes in every province in both the 1980s and the 1990s, regardless of whether there are provincial payroll taxes; rising EI premiums have also consistently been the leading contributor to the expansion of total payroll taxes during this period.

    Despite rapid growth in the 1980s and early 1990s, Canadian payroll taxes remain one of the lowest in the world's major developed economies. According to data compiled by the OECD, total payroll tax revenues in Canada amounted to 6.0% of GDP in 1996 --- that is 14% lower than that of the United States (at 7.0% of GDP); the lowest in the G7 nations; and the 9th lowest among the 29 OECD member states.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2001001
    Description:

    This report examines the results of the 1999 round of the Workplace and Employee Survey on the role that human resource practices play in facilitating workplace change. It focusses on practices such as workplace training, variable pay and employee involvement (job rotation, cross-training and teamwork), their association with change and whom they impact.

    Release date: 2001-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015854
    Description:

    This paper looks at a range of estimators applicable to a regularly repeated household survey with controlled overlap between successive surveys. The paper shows how the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) based on a fixed window of time points can be improved by applying the technique of generalised regression. This improved estimator is compared to the AK estimator of Gurney and Daly (1965) and the modified regression estimator of Singh, Kennedy, Wu and Brisebois (1997), using data from the Australian Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001001
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of the producer services sector in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2001-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010055724
    Description:

    This article looks at the extent of computer use by Canadian workers.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035717
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market outcomes of culture graduates at the university level.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

Reference (7)

Reference (7) (7 of 7 results)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

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