Statistics by subject – Labour

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All (235)

All (235) (25 of 235 results)

Data (161)

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Analysis (71)

Analysis (71) (25 of 71 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003019
    Description:

    This paper examines the migration of head offices to other countries from 1999 to 2002. It uses data from Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013101
    Description:

    This paper looks at 'non-standard,' 'contingent' and 'precarious' employment situations, which differ from the traditional model of a stable, full-time job.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310913100
    Description:

    This article examines the many dimensions of seasonality in employment to determine the extent to which each contributes to frequent reliance on Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030116683
    Description:

    This paper examines the number of hours worked as a result of the August 2003 power outage in Ontario and Gatineau, Quebec.

    Release date: 2003-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003004
    Description:

    This paper examines the increasing importance of high-knowledge occupations over the period 1971 to 1996. It also examines changes that have occurred for different knowledge professions, including managers, professionals and technical occupations, by industry and by geographic area.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003004
    Description:

    This paper examines the emergence of the knowledge economy by studying the increasing importance of high-knowledge occupations from 1971 to 2001.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003003
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002). Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth.

    Release date: 2003-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003008
    Description:

    This report estimates the impact of participating in adult education and training on the employment and earnings of Canadians, using the data from the 1998 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS).

    Release date: 2003-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003215
    Description:

    Using census data covering the 1980 to 2000 period, we examine what outcomes would be necessary for cohorts of recent immigrants to achieve earnings parity with Canadian-born workers. Our results show that today's recent immigrants would have to experience a drastic rise of their relative age-earnings profile in the near future for their earnings to converge with their Canadian-born counterparts. The reason is simple: the greater relative earnings growth experienced by cohorts of recent immigrants has only partially offset the drastic deterioration in their relative earnings at entry.

    Release date: 2003-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003210
    Description:

    The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation is studied in order to determine the extent to which higher education in Canada has increasingly become the domain of students from well-to-do families. An analysis of two separate data sets suggests that individuals from higher income families are much more likely to attend university, but this has been a long-standing tendency and the participation gap between students from the highest and lowest income families has in fact narrowed. The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation did become stronger during the early to mid 1990s, but weakened thereafter. This pattern reflects the fact that policy changes increasing the maximum amount of a student loan as well as increases in other forms of support occurred only after tuition fees had already started increasing.

    Release date: 2003-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003200
    Description:

    Using a dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelor's graduates from the classes of 1974-1996, this study examine the real annual earnings of graduates across 20 major fields of study for significant changes in earnings across cohorts. Male graduates in more recent cohorts had lower mean earnings after graduation but higher returns to experience. Recent cohorts of women graduates had equal earnings levels after graduation and higher returns to experience. Mean earnings differed among fields of study, favouring applied degrees in teacher training, commerce, engineering, nursing and medical sciences, but cohort effects were statistically identical for graduates from all fields of study. These results show no evidence of a major change in earnings consistent with a decline in returns to a university education, or a shift in demand favouring specific degrees.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310913099
    Description:

    The article provides the latest facts and figures on retirement.

    Release date: 2003-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030096579
    Description:

    This paper looks at the surge in demand for people skilled in computer specialties after the rapid growth of the information, communication and technology (ICT) industry in the 1990s. It uses data from the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 2003-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813098
    Description:

    This article examines the grievance system, or the dispute- or complaint-resolution system, in the workplace.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613092
    Description:

    This article provides a look at some of the triggers of workplace stress among employed Canadians. It compares the self-employed and hired employees, full-time and part-time employees, and occupation groups.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003209
    Description:

    This paper investigates annual working hours in the United States and Canada over the period 1979 to 2000. The study finds that a working hours gap opened in the 1980s and expanded substantially in the 1990s. It investigates the possibility that labour supply differences, specifically (1) incentives resulting from wage inequality, or (2) differences in the employment engagement of women, youth or older men, explain this working hours gap. The study finds that the stylized facts do not lead one to a supply side explanation. In fact, the sluggish economic growth in Canada relative to the U.S. (reflected in the unemployment rate) during much of the 1990s provides the best explanation for the increase in the hours gap, suggesting that explanations for the divergence in hours worked between the U.S. and Canada should focus on the demand side of the labour market.

    Release date: 2003-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026621
    Description:

    This article examines triggers of workplace stress among employed Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-584-M
    Description:

    Analysts from Statistics Canada and Human Resources Canada are collaborating on a series of studies addressing topics such as an overview on the changing nature of work and the terms of work; the link between the education level of the establishment's workforce and its technology adoption and innovation practices; the effect of foreign competition on the productivity-enhancing behaviour of companies; which firms have high vacancy rates in Canada; a profile of job vacancies in Canada: and the effect of employer characteristics on the gender gap. These reports will be released sequentially throughout 2001.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2003008
    Description:

    This study investigates the relation between human resource management (HRM) practices, such as using financial (compensation pay) as well as non-financial benefits (employee involvement practices and training) to provide a more stimulating environment for its workers, and the novelty of innovation by Canadian establishments.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003016
    Description:

    This paper examines the influence of the dramatic expansion of self-employment on the Canadian business sector's growth in labour productivity. It compares Canadian and American experiences in this area from 1987 to 1998.

    Release date: 2003-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030086616
    Description:

    This paper examines the influence of the expansion of the unincorporated self-employed on growth in labour productivity in the business sector and compares Canadian and U.S. experiences over the 1987 to 1998 reference period.

    Release date: 2003-08-28

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Reference (3) (3 results)

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