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All (85)

All (85) (25 of 85 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20040007443
    Description:

    Estimates of the prevalence of symptoms consistent with bipolar I disorder among Canadians aged 15 or older are presented. Factors associated with employment among people who have the disorder are analysed.

    Release date: 2004-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004219
    Description:

    This study investigates trends in family income inequality in the 1980s and 1990s, with particular attention paid to the recovery period of the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004234
    Description:

    This article analyses the relationship between the quality of education that immigrants received in their home country, as measured by international test scores, and their success in the Canadian labour market.

    Release date: 2004-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004019
    Description:

    This study examines the effect of Christmas shopping on retail sales and employment during the months of November, December and January. The analysis focusses on stores registering significantly increased activity during the holiday season. These stores were grouped by the relative expensiveness of their most popular offerings during this period. This study uses data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey and the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004235
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the gender earnings gap among recent Canadian bachelor-level university graduates. Hours of work are the single most important influence on the gap; past work experience, job characteristics, family status, province of residence, and language have smaller and more mixed effects.

    Release date: 2004-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004006
    Description:

    In this bulletin, each industry is examined to assess the differences in occupational skill intensity between rural and urban Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-29

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007451
    Description:

    Our social contacts and networks influence many aspects of our lives. Both workers and employers use "social networks" in various ways. Information from personal and professional contacts may lead to a better "match" between a worker and a job than do hirings through purely formal means without access to information from personal contacts. This improved match may also lead to better job outcomes. Social networks could also been seen to be limiting or exclusive of some workers. This presentation discusses findings from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics on the use of personal and professional networks in obtaining work. Who uses social networks to find work? What types of work are obtained? Is there a relationship between the use of personal or professional contacts and job outcomes? These are questions of interest for workers, employers and professionals in human resources and employment services.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007458
    Description:

    This paper examines whether permanent layoff rates have increased in Canada between the 1980s and the 1990s, using data from the Longitudinal Worker File - a 10% random sample of all Canadian employees.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004007
    Description:

    This paper examines the issue of whether investment in information and communication technologies, combined with organizational changes and worker skills, contribute to better performance in Canadian firms.

    Release date: 2004-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2004046
    Description:

    This overview examines recent economic developments and trends in the major aggregates that comprise GDP, both income and expenditure-based, and includes tables of key variables for each of the provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2004-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411013128
    Description:

    Who were the low-wage earners in 2000, what proportion lived in low-income families, and how did the situation change between 1980 and 2000? Low wages need not mean economic hardship: for example young people living with their parents or spouses who are secondary earners may not be at risk. However, groups such as recent immigrants, lone mothers, and unattached individuals may well be at risk.

    Release date: 2004-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411013129
    Description:

    As a large number of people near the traditional retirement age, what are the social and economic consequences of a mass exit from the labour force? Would older workers remain on the job if mandatory retirement policies were eliminated or if, for example, incentives such as part-time work or more vacation leave were offered?

    Release date: 2004-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004231
    Description:

    In this paper, Canadian longitudinal tax-based data are used to estimate models of the receipt of social assistance, or welfare, in a given year as well as the underlying dynamics: entry onto social assistance from one year to another, exit from a given spell of social assistance and re-entry onto social assistance after the end of a previous spell.

    Release date: 2004-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004017
    Description:

    With the help of data from the censuses of 1981 through 2001, this study examines the evolution of employment incomes (expressed in 2001 constant dollars) of less educated couples and highly educated couples.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004230
    Description:

    This study explores the labour market performance of low and high educated couples using Census data for the period 1980 to 2000.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004232
    Description:

    This study extends previous work on the evolution of the education premium, and investigates the existence of diverging university/high school earnings ratio trends across industries in the knowledge-based economy. The study also discusses the changing demand for high-skilled workers by comparing relative wages of university graduates holding degrees in "applied" fields to those of other university graduates (the "field" premium).

    Release date: 2004-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410813125
    Description:

    This article discusses recent trends in the union movement, including numbers of members, the proportion of women, the transition from goods-producing to service industries, the shift in share from private- to public-sector unions, and in-roads among part-time workers and in smaller workplaces.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004229
    Description:

    This study examines trends in the internal migration of the Canadian-born and long-term immigrants into and out of Canada's three largest metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2004012
    Description:

    This monograph series features detailed studies from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) database by Canadian and U.S. literacy scholars and experts. Monographs focus on current policy issues and cover topics such as adult training, literacy skill match and mismatch in the workplace, seniors' literacy skills and health as well as literacy and economic security.

    Release date: 2004-09-07

Data (23)

Data (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Table: 95F0379X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0383X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0382X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0380X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0377X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0381X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0378X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0384X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0385X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0390X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Unpaid work,' which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians. This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyse the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyse how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 97F0022X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0022X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X
    Description:

    The tables under the topic "Canada's Workforce: Unpaid Work" present data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care, and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001049
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Canada's Work force: Unpaid work,' which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian work force, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyse the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyse how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0013XIE2001049.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001050
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Canada's Work force: Unpaid work,' which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian work force, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyse the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyse how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0013XIE2001050.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001041
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Work force: Unpaid Work," which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0013XIE2001041.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0011X2001060
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey .

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0011XIE2001060.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0011X2001061
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey .

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0011XIE2001061.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0012X2001048
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001048.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0012X2001050
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001050.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0012X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0012X2001047
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001047.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0024X2001016
    Description:

    These data tables present selected variables from the 2001 Census according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The tables allow the user to perform simple rank and sort functions. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories.

    The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

Analysis (48)

Analysis (48) (25 of 48 results)

Reference (14)

Reference (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007451
    Description:

    Our social contacts and networks influence many aspects of our lives. Both workers and employers use "social networks" in various ways. Information from personal and professional contacts may lead to a better "match" between a worker and a job than do hirings through purely formal means without access to information from personal contacts. This improved match may also lead to better job outcomes. Social networks could also been seen to be limiting or exclusive of some workers. This presentation discusses findings from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics on the use of personal and professional networks in obtaining work. Who uses social networks to find work? What types of work are obtained? Is there a relationship between the use of personal or professional contacts and job outcomes? These are questions of interest for workers, employers and professionals in human resources and employment services.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007458
    Description:

    This paper examines whether permanent layoff rates have increased in Canada between the 1980s and the 1990s, using data from the Longitudinal Worker File - a 10% random sample of all Canadian employees.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004009
    Description:

    This study profiles full-time, full-year Canadian workers with low weekly earnings in their main job in 1996, and examines their upward mobility in 2001 using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics.

    Release date: 2004-08-31

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004071
    Description:

    This paper looks at non-farm trends for rural women using data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Index and guides: 92-388-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information to help users interpret and make use of census occupation data. It gives an overview of the collection, coding (to the 2001 National Occupational Classification), edit and imputation of the occupation data from the 2001 Census. The report describes procedural changes between the 2001 and earlier censuses, and provides an analysis of the quality level of the 2001 Census occupation data. Finally, it details the revision of the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification used in the 1991 and 1996 Censuses to the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics used in 2001. The historical comparability of data coded to the two classifications is discussed. Appendices to the report include a table showing historical data for the 1991, 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

    Release date: 2004-07-15

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004007
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2003 labour interview of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), including question wording, possible responses and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2004-06-21

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004005
    Description:

    This document presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2003 preliminary questionnaire of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2004-06-18

  • Index and guides: 92-391-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information intended to facilitate the use and interpretation of census industry data. It provides an overview of the industry processing cycle, including elements such as regional processing, edit and imputation, and the tabulation of error rates. A detailed explanation of the automated coding systems used in the 2001 Census is also documented, in addition to notable changes in the imputation procedures. The report concludes with summary tables that indicate the level of data quality in the 2001 Census industry data. Appendices to the report contain historical data going back to the 1971 Census.

    Release date: 2004-06-02

  • Index and guides: 92-389-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information intended to facilitate the use and interpretation of census industry data. It provides an overview of the industry processing cycle, including elements such as regional processing, edit and imputation, and the tabulation of error rates. Notable changes in the industrial classification structure are discussed as well as differences in the coding procedures from the previous census (1996). The report concludes with summary tables that indicate the level of data quality in the 2001 Census industry data.

    Release date: 2004-05-04

  • Index and guides: 92-398-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information intended to facilitate the use and interpretation of census class of worker data. It provides an overview of the class of worker processing cycle including elements such as regional office processing, and edit and imputation. The report concludes with summary tables that indicate the level of data quality in the 2001 Census class of worker data.

    Release date: 2004-04-22

  • Technical products: 16-001-M2004001
    Description:

    The collection of firms producing environmental goods and delivering environmental services constitutes the 'environment industry.' This industry has grown significantly in the past 20 years and stands to continue this development in the future as emerging issues such as the level of greenhouse gas emissions are addressed.

    An important aspect in the evaluation of the industry's performance is in the area of job creation and employment generation. Related to the challenges involved in classifying firms to the environment industry is the issue of identifying the employees who work in environment-related activities. Currently, the published data on employment include only the total employment of those businesses producing environmental goods and services, i.e., employees who worked in the production/provision of goods and services that have both environmental and non-environmental applications.

    Release date: 2004-04-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004003
    Description:

    This study profiles Canadian workers with low weekly earnings in their main job in 1996 and examines their upward mobility in 2001, using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2004-03-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004067
    Description:

    This paper assesses the degree of spatial diversity exhibited across Canada by using 1996 Census of Population data, aggregated at the census division (CD) level. The approach taken in this research adopts a broad territorial focus, is exploratory in nature and emphasizes territorial performance in a comparative context.

    The study is based on a range of commonly used and understood demographic, social and economic variables. A factor analysis was conducted in order to identify underlying dimensions that characterize each CD across Canada. The factor analysis resulted in six factors, each of which provides a profile of the CDs on a number of key attributes.

    The research is primarily descriptive and will be of interest to a broad audience. It can be used to facilitate the diffusion of baseline data to a wide range of stakeholders, stimulate discussion on spatial diversity at the subprovincial level and enhance the debate on potential alternative development paths for each region. Note that this research is, in turn, constrained by the nature of the data available. The analysis is also static and focussed on a cross-section. The causes of the observed diversity are not explicitly accounted for in the study.

    Release date: 2004-03-17

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