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All (57) (25 of 57 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610913171
    Description:

    From 1995 to 2004, the proportion of women and men aged 25 to 54 in the labour force grew steadily. However, from 2004 into the first half of 2006, both women's and men's participation rates declined very slightly yet persistently. Is this the beginning of a new trend or does it merely reflect regular fluctuations in the economy? Particular attention is focused on women with young children.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006048
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2004-2005. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2006-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006287
    Description:

    We model the effects of product market competition on agency costs, and develop two main empirical predictions. First, competition, by reducing agency costs, unambiguously increases the importance firms place on quality improvements. This leads to higher powered incentives, and in turn to increased effort and quality. Second, these effects are increasing in the severity of agency problems, and should be stronger in large, hierarchical corporations (where agency problems are more severe) than in entrepreneurial firms. We test the predictions of our model using a unique dataset with both firm and employee characteristics.

    Release date: 2006-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006288
    Description:

    This paper exploits the unique strengths of the tax-based Longitudinal Administrative Database to measure the flows of Canadians to other countries and the patterns of return over the period from 1982 to 2003. Overall, approximately 0.1% (i.e., one tenth of 1%) of the adult population leaves the country in any given year. Departure rates have generally moved with the state of the Canadian economy, but the trends have clearly been driven by more than this: declining in the 1980s as the economy was going well; turning up towards the end of the decade, but before the economy began to stall in 1989; rising through the early part of the 1990s as the economy was mired in a deep recession, but then continuing to rise through 1997, by which time a strong recovery was underway; and then declining sharply since 2000-thus stemming what many had thought was an inexorable upwards trend-when economic factors were fairly stable. Departure rates decline with age (except for the youngest group); are lower for couples without children than other family types; are high for those in British Columbia, quite low for Francophone Quebecers, and very high for Anglophones in that province; are somewhat lower for those on Employment Insurance (formerly Unemployment Insurance) and substantially higher for those at higher-income levels; and are very much higher for recent immigrants. Departure rates for those at higher-income levels shifted upwards in the 1990s, but returned to pre-1990s rates in more recent years in the case of men, while the shift was maintained for women. Only a minority of those who leave ever return: about 15% within 5 years of their departure. Return rates have, however, increased significantly since 2000-mirroring to a large extent what was happening on the departure side.

    Release date: 2006-11-17

  • Public use microdata: 72M0002X
    Description:

    The primary objective of the Changes in Employment Survey (CIES) is to evaluate the impact of Bill C-12 on the Employment Insurance legislation and the degree to which program objectives have been achieved. Bill C-12 was introduced into legislation in part in July 1996, with the remainder coming into effect in January 1997. The legislation was designed to better reward work effort, to ensure adequate benefits by targeting those most in need, to encourage job creation, and to improve the perception of fairness. Specific aspects of these objectives were addressed in the survey. In addition, the survey attempts to get a measure of the aggregate impact of the legislation.

    Secondary objectives of the survey include the continuation of the information collected in the 1993 and 1995 Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Surveys. This includes collection of background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, assets and debts, expenditures, and utilization of Employment Insurance and Social Assistance.

    Microdata files for the Changes in Employment Survey (CIES) are now available for five reference periods. They are: Cohorts 1 and 2: January 1995 to September 1996; Cohorts 3 and 4: July 1995 to February 1997; Cohorts 5 and 6: January 1996 to September 1997; Cohorts 7 and 8: July 1996 to February 1998; and Cohorts 9 and 10: January 1997 to September 1998.

    Release date: 2006-11-16

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049495
    Description:

    This article describes stress levels among the employed population aged 18 to 75 and examines associations between stress and depression.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006286
    Description:

    We analyze the degree to which Canadian families are covered by private pension plans and document how their savings for retirement (made through contributions to tax-assisted retirement savings programs) have evolved over the last two decades. We find that two-parent families, lone-parent families and other individuals located in the bottom quintile of the earnings distribution are not better prepared for retirement than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. On the other hand, those located in the top quintile are better prepared than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. As a result, Canadian families' preparedness for retirement, which was fairly unequal in the mid-1980s, has become even more unequal over the last two decades. This finding has important implications for the future. Recent research has shown that the maturation of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPPs) has led to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the absence of offsetting trends, the growing inequality in Canadian families preparedness for retirement implies that that the distribution of family income among seniors should become more unequal in the years to come.

    Release date: 2006-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813169
    Description:

    Over the last four decades, the dramatic increase in dual-earner couples has also engendered an increase in wives as primary breadwinners. These women tend to be older and more educated than women who are secondary earners, and they are more frequently found in managerial and professional occupations. The article examines the earnings and characteristics of primary- and secondary-earner spouses.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813170
    Description:

    Improvements during the 1980s and 1990s in Canada's strike and lockout statistics appear to have stalled somewhat in recent years. The drop in time lost to industrial disputes at the beginning of the decade was offset by increases in 2004 and 2005. It is too early to say if this is the beginning of a new trend. What can be done, however, is to gain an understanding of recent stoppages by looking at the main areas of dispute, the jurisdictions in which the stoppages occurred, and how they were resolved.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006046
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities for the academic year 2005/2006. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2006. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff Survey and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2006) are not included in this bulletin. This information is available by special request to Client Services, Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics (see Contact information, below).

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006045
    Description:

    Based on data from cycle 3 of the Youth in Transition Survey, this report provides an overview of the school and labour market pathways undertaken by Canadian youth between December 1999 and December 2003. In particular, the report looks at the proportion of youth who completed high school and who participated in postsecondary education and labour market activities over that period. The report provides a starting point to understanding the nature of school-work transitions.

    Release date: 2006-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513164
    Description:

    Between 1971 and 2005, Canada's labour force became more educated in line with the increased credentials of new entrants, while the aging of the workforce shifted the experience profile upwards. However, this was not reflected in unemployment rates, which were for the most part slightly higher in 2005 than in 1971. What factors are at play? The article looks at specific age-education combinations to yield a more nuanced long-term perspective on current labour market conditions.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Public use microdata: 72M0002X
    Description:

    The primary objective of the Changes in Employment Survey (CIES) is to evaluate the impact of Bill C-12 on the Employment Insurance legislation and the degree to which program objectives have been achieved. Bill C-12 was introduced into legislation in part in July 1996, with the remainder coming into effect in January 1997. The legislation was designed to better reward work effort, to ensure adequate benefits by targeting those most in need, to encourage job creation, and to improve the perception of fairness. Specific aspects of these objectives were addressed in the survey. In addition, the survey attempts to get a measure of the aggregate impact of the legislation.

    Secondary objectives of the survey include the continuation of the information collected in the 1993 and 1995 Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Surveys. This includes collection of background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, assets and debts, expenditures, and utilization of Employment Insurance and Social Assistance.

    Microdata files for the Changes in Employment Survey (CIES) are now available for five reference periods. They are: Cohorts 1 and 2: January 1995 to September 1996; Cohorts 3 and 4: July 1995 to February 1997; Cohorts 5 and 6: January 1996 to September 1997; Cohorts 7 and 8: July 1996 to February 1998; and Cohorts 9 and 10: January 1997 to September 1998.

    Release date: 2006-11-16

  • Table: 65-507-M2006007
    Description:

    This paper will examine the overall impact of diamonds on the NWT since 1999 and provide data on production values from 2002 to 2005.

    The total impact of the discovery of diamonds in the NWT extends far beyond the scope of increased exports. Diamonds have had a significant effect on many aspects of the economy of the NWT. Manufacturing shipments, employment, GDP and income per capita have all seen remarkable turnarounds since the onset of production in 1999.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

Analysis (49)

Analysis (49) (25 of 49 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610913171
    Description:

    From 1995 to 2004, the proportion of women and men aged 25 to 54 in the labour force grew steadily. However, from 2004 into the first half of 2006, both women's and men's participation rates declined very slightly yet persistently. Is this the beginning of a new trend or does it merely reflect regular fluctuations in the economy? Particular attention is focused on women with young children.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006048
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2004-2005. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2006-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006287
    Description:

    We model the effects of product market competition on agency costs, and develop two main empirical predictions. First, competition, by reducing agency costs, unambiguously increases the importance firms place on quality improvements. This leads to higher powered incentives, and in turn to increased effort and quality. Second, these effects are increasing in the severity of agency problems, and should be stronger in large, hierarchical corporations (where agency problems are more severe) than in entrepreneurial firms. We test the predictions of our model using a unique dataset with both firm and employee characteristics.

    Release date: 2006-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006288
    Description:

    This paper exploits the unique strengths of the tax-based Longitudinal Administrative Database to measure the flows of Canadians to other countries and the patterns of return over the period from 1982 to 2003. Overall, approximately 0.1% (i.e., one tenth of 1%) of the adult population leaves the country in any given year. Departure rates have generally moved with the state of the Canadian economy, but the trends have clearly been driven by more than this: declining in the 1980s as the economy was going well; turning up towards the end of the decade, but before the economy began to stall in 1989; rising through the early part of the 1990s as the economy was mired in a deep recession, but then continuing to rise through 1997, by which time a strong recovery was underway; and then declining sharply since 2000-thus stemming what many had thought was an inexorable upwards trend-when economic factors were fairly stable. Departure rates decline with age (except for the youngest group); are lower for couples without children than other family types; are high for those in British Columbia, quite low for Francophone Quebecers, and very high for Anglophones in that province; are somewhat lower for those on Employment Insurance (formerly Unemployment Insurance) and substantially higher for those at higher-income levels; and are very much higher for recent immigrants. Departure rates for those at higher-income levels shifted upwards in the 1990s, but returned to pre-1990s rates in more recent years in the case of men, while the shift was maintained for women. Only a minority of those who leave ever return: about 15% within 5 years of their departure. Return rates have, however, increased significantly since 2000-mirroring to a large extent what was happening on the departure side.

    Release date: 2006-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049495
    Description:

    This article describes stress levels among the employed population aged 18 to 75 and examines associations between stress and depression.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006286
    Description:

    We analyze the degree to which Canadian families are covered by private pension plans and document how their savings for retirement (made through contributions to tax-assisted retirement savings programs) have evolved over the last two decades. We find that two-parent families, lone-parent families and other individuals located in the bottom quintile of the earnings distribution are not better prepared for retirement than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. On the other hand, those located in the top quintile are better prepared than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. As a result, Canadian families' preparedness for retirement, which was fairly unequal in the mid-1980s, has become even more unequal over the last two decades. This finding has important implications for the future. Recent research has shown that the maturation of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPPs) has led to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the absence of offsetting trends, the growing inequality in Canadian families preparedness for retirement implies that that the distribution of family income among seniors should become more unequal in the years to come.

    Release date: 2006-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813169
    Description:

    Over the last four decades, the dramatic increase in dual-earner couples has also engendered an increase in wives as primary breadwinners. These women tend to be older and more educated than women who are secondary earners, and they are more frequently found in managerial and professional occupations. The article examines the earnings and characteristics of primary- and secondary-earner spouses.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813170
    Description:

    Improvements during the 1980s and 1990s in Canada's strike and lockout statistics appear to have stalled somewhat in recent years. The drop in time lost to industrial disputes at the beginning of the decade was offset by increases in 2004 and 2005. It is too early to say if this is the beginning of a new trend. What can be done, however, is to gain an understanding of recent stoppages by looking at the main areas of dispute, the jurisdictions in which the stoppages occurred, and how they were resolved.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006046
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities for the academic year 2005/2006. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2006. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff Survey and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2006) are not included in this bulletin. This information is available by special request to Client Services, Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics (see Contact information, below).

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006045
    Description:

    Based on data from cycle 3 of the Youth in Transition Survey, this report provides an overview of the school and labour market pathways undertaken by Canadian youth between December 1999 and December 2003. In particular, the report looks at the proportion of youth who completed high school and who participated in postsecondary education and labour market activities over that period. The report provides a starting point to understanding the nature of school-work transitions.

    Release date: 2006-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513164
    Description:

    Between 1971 and 2005, Canada's labour force became more educated in line with the increased credentials of new entrants, while the aging of the workforce shifted the experience profile upwards. However, this was not reflected in unemployment rates, which were for the most part slightly higher in 2005 than in 1971. What factors are at play? The article looks at specific age-education combinations to yield a more nuanced long-term perspective on current labour market conditions.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413162
    Description:

    Some 720,000 work absences of two weeks or longer due to illness or disability were reported in 2003, 200,000 of which were work-related. With a median duration of 11 weeks, each of these long-term absences costs roughly $8,800. Furthermore, absences lasting upwards of four months were generally associated with negative health, stress, career stagnation, and heightened chances of being on leave again the following year.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610513163
    Description:

    Finding the right person for the job is the goal of every hiring decision. In most cases, a personal interview combined with a skill-specific test will be enough for both parties to see if they are compatible. However, for dangerous jobs or where public safety or security is at stake, more stringent requirements need to be met. Medical examinations, security checks, and drugs tests are three screening techniques employers use.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006003
    Description:

    The Survey of Income and Labour Dynamics (SLID) interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire.

    In previous years, SLID conducted a Labour interview each January and a separate Income interview in May. In 2005 (reference year 2004) the two interviews were combined and collected in one interview in January.

    A labour and income interview is collected for all respondents 16 years of age and over. Respondents have the option of answering income questions during the interview, or of giving Statistics Canada permission to use their income tax records.

    In January 2005, data was collected for reference year 2004 from panels 3 and 4. Panel 3, in its sixth and final year, consisted of approximately 17,000 households and panel 4, in its third year, also consisted of approximately 17,000 households.

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2005 Labour and Income interview (for the 2004 reference year) including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006001
    Description:

    A Preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the sample for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). For the majority of the longitudinal respondents, this occurs when a new panel is introduced and the preliminary information is collected during the first Labour interview. However, all persons living with a longitudinal respondent are also interviewed for SLID. Thus Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first Labour interview after they join the household. Longitudinal persons who have turned 16 while their household is in the SLID sample are then eligible for SLID interviews so they are asked the Preliminary interview questions during their first Labour interview.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2005 Preliminary questionnaire (for the 2004 reference year).

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006002
    Description:

    In previous years, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducted a Labour interview each January and a separate Income interview in May. In 2005 (reference year 2004) the two interviews were combined and collected in one interview in January.

    The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing. Thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for Labour and Income are documented in other SLID research papers. This document presents the information for the 2005 Entry Exit portion of the Labour Income interview (for the 2004 reference year).

    The Entry Exit Component consists of five separate modules. The Entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in Entry, the Demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the Relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The Exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the Tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2006-03-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2006003
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2006. Some of these modifications include changes to the population estimates, improvements to the public and private sector estimates and historical updates to several small Census Agglomerations (CA).

    Release date: 2006-01-25

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