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Analysis (32)

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008311
    Description:

    This paper examines the variability of workers' earnings in Canada over the 1982-to-2000 period by a graphical descriptive approach using the Longitudinal Administrative Data base file. Following Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994), we decompose the total variance of workers' earnings into a 'permanent' or long-run component between workers and a 'transitory' or year-to-year earnings instability component over time for given workers. The decomposition is applied to a five-year moving window. Several results are found. First, the general rise in total earnings variance over the period reflects quite different patterns of change for its separate components. Long-run earnings inequality has generally increased over the period, while year-to-year earnings instability has pretty steadily decreased. Changes in the total earnings variability have been driven primarily by changes in long-run earnings inequality. Second, the patterns of change in the two variance components showed substantial differences between men and women. Since the early 1990s, long-run earnings inequality continued to rise for men, but it markedly decreased for women. Since the late 1980s, earnings instability fell quite steadily for women, but it showed a more cyclical pattern for men. Third, the patterns across ages of the two variance components are almost opposite. Long-run earnings inequality generally rises with age, so it is markedly highest among older-age workers. Earnings instability, in contrast, generally declines with age, so it is markedly highest among entry-age workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013218
    Description:

    Interprovincial migration is a key component of demographic change in Canada. It also influences the supply of public services and tax revenues, the performance and efficiency of labour markets and productivity. As one would expect, people generally move from provinces with slack local labour markets to provinces with stronger labour markets. Improvements in labour market conditions and labour market outcomes tend to reduce out-migration rates. Migrants also record better earnings growth than non-migrants, especially when they are young.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113220
    Description:

    Commuting is, to a large extent, an urban phenomenon. Close to 80% of commuting takes place between municipalities within larger urban centres. But commuting patterns are becoming increasingly complex and rural commuting is more complex than commonly believed. For persons in rural and small-town areas, rural-to-rural commuting is as large as rural-to-urban commuting. Moreover, rural jobs are more than twice as reliant on in-commuting rural workers as they are on in-commuting urban workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810913216
    Description:

    In 2007, the proportion of employed people in Canada was at its highest level in at least three decades, while the national unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low of 5.8%. However, manufacturing employment in Canada, as in the United States, has been on a downward trend. Between 2002 and 2007 employment rates increased the most in the highest-paying industries and occupations. On the other hand, some job losses were experienced by machine operators and assembly workers. Retail trade had been the largest creator of new jobs but was surpassed in 2007 by construction, and health care and social assistance.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2008001
    Description:

    This is the first report in the series. This report presents the first national estimates on the labour market experiences of Aboriginal people living off-reserve from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). These estimates are based on the year 2007 and cover Aboriginal people living off-reserve in the ten provinces. This report examines the labour force characteristics of the Aboriginal people, namely the employment and unemployment rates as well as wages by Aboriginal identity. The report further looks at the estimates by non-Aboriginal as well as Aboriginal, North American Indian and Métis populations. Also included is limited analysis on the Inuit population using the 2006 Census results, since the LFS sample size was too small for this group. Data are presented for the following characteristics: age, sex, educational attainment, province or region and industry. Finally, trend analysis is provided for the four western provinces over a four year period. The previously released report (Catalogue no. 71-587-X) provided analysis for the western provinces from April 2004 to March 2005.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200801010713
    Description:

    While factory jobs have declined in recent years, this has been outweighed by gains elsewhere, often in high-paying occupations.

    Release date: 2008-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713214
    Description:

    Canada's military makes up a small but significant segment of Canadian society and is an important part of the country's national image, both at home and abroad. After declining through the 1990s, the forces have grown since 2001, reaching 88,000 in 2006. This article profiles the personnel of the Canadian Forces as a special occupational group distinct from the rest of the Canadian labour force. It also compares the military's prevalence of rates of work stress and other work-related mental health issues with those of the civilian working population and investigates whether any specific groups experience a higher prevalence.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810313205
    Description:

    Hours of work can vary dramatically from job to job. And some research has indicated that the greater inequality of earnings into the mid-1990s was accompanied by increasing polarization of working hours. More recently, attention has focused on a decline in average working hours. This article quantifies changes in average work hours since the 1970s and examines how changes in the distribution of work hours contribute to the overall trend.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008003
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. This third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups, using 2007 Labour Force Survey data now available.

    Release date: 2008-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008068
    Description:

    This study examines retirements since the turn of the millennium among permanent federal employees who occupy jobs subject to the Public Service Employment Act. This study presents statistics on retirements, retirement eligibility, and pensionable years accumulated by age and sex for fiscal year 2006/2007 and other selected fiscal years in the new millennium.

    Release date: 2008-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008002
    Description:

    The study is the second in a series of analytical articles on immigrants in the labour force based on data from the Labour Force Survey. It sheds light on the relationship between the region or country of birth for immigrants to Canada, when they landed in Canada, and their labour market outcomes (i.e., unemployment, employment and participation rates) in 2006.

    This second report builds on the findings from the original report. It addresses how well immigrants from specific regions or countries of birth fared in the Canadian labour market in 2006.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800410559
    Description:

    Despite the turmoil in financial markets and a slowdown in the US, Canada's growth was remarkably steady in 2007. This reflects the ongoing boom in the resource sector and the boost the rising loonie gave to domestic spending.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008062
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2007/2008. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by February 2008. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008309
    Description:

    The deterioration of immigrants' entry earnings in Canada in the past three decades has been well documented. This study provides further insights into the changing fortunes of immigrants by focusing on their earnings inequality and earnings instability. The analysis is based on a flexible econometric model that decomposes earnings inequality into current and long-term components. In addition to constructing earnings inequality and earnings instability profiles for different arrival cohorts, we also examine the underlying causes of earnings inequality, including the impact of foreign education, birthplace and the ability to speak English or French.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

Reference (18)

Reference (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Index and guides: 97-563-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following variables: After-tax income, Total income and its components, Income status as well as other related variables from the Income and earnings release.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008004
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008002
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008003
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008005
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008006
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008007
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008009
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008008
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Index and guides: 97-559-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topics: Labour market activity and Unpaid work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-06-10

  • Index and guides: 97-561-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Journey to work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-06-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2008002
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts an annual labour and income interview in January. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing; thus no paper questionnaire is required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for labour and income are documented in another SLID research paper. This document presents the information for the 2007 entry and exit portions of the labour and income interview (reference year 2006).

    The entry exit component consists of five separate modules. The entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in entry, the demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2008-05-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2008003
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey which collects information related to the standard of living of individuals and their families. By interviewing the same people over a period of six years, changes and the causes of these changes can be monitored.

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the SLID sample. Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first labour and income interview after they join the household. A labour and income interview is collected each year for all respondents 16 years of age and over.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2007 preliminary, labour and income questionnaire (for the 2006 reference year).

    Release date: 2008-05-30

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2008088
    Description:

    The results of this research show that exposure to global restructuring trends increases community vulnerability to population and employment decline. Similarly, other condititions of community distress, such as high unemployment rates and low participation rates, increase the vulnerability to decline. Community assets, such as human capital, economic diversification, and proximity to agglomerations, reduce vulnerability to population and employment decline.

    Release date: 2008-04-14

  • Index and guides: 97-561-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Journey to work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

  • Index and guides: 97-559-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topics: Labour market activity and Unpaid work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

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