Statistics by subject – Labour

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Analysis (28)

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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910913236
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between health and work. Poor mental and physical health were found to decrease the probability of being employed, particularly among men. For women, mental health problems were also associated with working fewer hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2009001
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. The third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups. The fourth report analyzed 2007 employment rates for immigrants based on where they obtained their highest postsecondary education. This fifth report analyzed employment quality characteristics of immigrants using 2008 data.

    Release date: 2009-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111023
    Description:

    A look at how the labour market changed between October 2008 and 2009.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713233
    Description:

    Workers at the low end of the earnings scale, workers with less education, non-unionized workers and women are all less likely than other workers to receive employer-sponsored training. But they are also less likely to decline it when it is offered. Within each of the first three categories, women lag behind men in receiving training. Controlling for various individual, job and workplace characteristics helps explain some of these persistent labour market differences between men and women.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313226
    Description:

    Employment in Canada continued to grow for most of 2008, although at a slower pace than in 2007, with losses in the final quarter of the year. Employment in the United States, however, showed pronounced monthly declines throughout 2008. Other major labour market indicators in Canada such as the employment rate, the unemployment rate and the participation rate all outperformed their U.S. counterparts, with Canada's weakness surfacing in manufacturing employment.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513229
    Description:

    Longitudinal data show that disability can be temporary or episodic. Between 1999 and 2004, only 13% of those reporting a disability were affected for the entire 6 years. The longer the disability period, the more likely the individuals were to have less education, be women, be older, live alone and work fewer hours per year. Moreover, the effects of a disability were often felt outside the actual period of the disability.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2009002
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides summary information about students' transitions from school to the labour market, based on data showing employment status, earnings, and the mobility of students and graduates across Canada. Charts and tables released at the same time as this fact sheet complement the text and summarize data for Canada, the provinces and the territories from the Labour Force Survey, the National Graduates Survey, and the Follow-up of Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009076
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2008/2009. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by April 2009. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213224
    Description:

    Following six years of strong employment growth, 2008 started well as Canada's employment rate hit a new high and the unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low. In the last quarter of the year, however, job losses in cyclically sensitive industries such as manufacturing, natural resources and construction led to a drop in overall employment.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213223
    Description:

    Manufacturing employment has been declining in most OECD countries. From 2004 to 2008, more than one in seven manufacturing jobs were lost in Canada, with almost all manufacturing industries sharing in the downturn. The majority of job losses were in Ontario, but other parts of the country were also affected. Canada's large metropolitan areas were the hardest hit.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910113222
    Description:

    Traditional age-earnings profiles, based on cross-sectional data, typically follow an inverted U-shaped pattern with annual earnings peaking around middle age. With longitudinal data on hourly earnings, the picture changes considerably.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110782
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a demographic portrait of justice-related occupations and their evolution between 1991 and 2006. Four groups are analysed in more detail: police officers, private security officers, court workers and correctional service officers. Most of the data analysed are from the 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, and some complementary information from other sources is also used. The evolution of the age structure of these groups is analyzed and compared to the age structure of all Canadian workers. Questions related to the aging and renewal of the workforce are also addressed.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

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Reference (2) (2 results)

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