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All (54) (25 of 54 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011096
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2009/2010. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2011-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201101211611
    Description:

    This paper reviews trends in the labour force participation rate from 1997 to the third quarter of 2011 and explores possible explanations as to why the participation rate was no longer increasing even before the onset of the 2008-2009 recession.

    Release date: 2011-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2011003
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the labour market outcomes of Aboriginal people during and after the labour market downturn. It covers the period of 2008 to 2010, using annual averages by several demographic and labour market activity indicators available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). It is divided by age group, as well as, when possible, by the Aboriginal identity groups: First Nations people living off-reserve and Métis. The Inuit population are included in the Aboriginal total but not separately as most estimates for this group were not reliable. The report also distinguishes Aboriginal labour market outcomes by gender, province or region and job characteristics such as industry, occupation, hours worked and highest level of education attained.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411593
    Description:

    Following an economic shock affecting a city or region, many residents - particularly those who have just lost their jobs - will likely look to migrate to another region to improve their economic situation. This study uses data from the 1997 to 2008 Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to evaluate the impact of regional economic shocks on the migration of residents. In particular, it examines the extent to which a deterioration in the relative economic position of a region and a decrease in personal income are linked to higher probabilities of migration.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2011-11-08

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411579
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2010 and the first half of 2011. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011094
    Description:

    Unlike the waves of immigrants who arrived in the 1950s and 1960s, those arriving in Canada since the 1970s have possessed relatively high educational levels, making an enormous contribution to the pool of individuals in Canada with postsecondary qualifications. Upon their arrival however, many immigrants initially face difficulties finding employment related to their field of study as well as finding jobs that pay relatively high wages.

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, the report presents a profile of internationally-educated paid workers and focus on the different characteristics and determinants more closely associated with an easier integration in the Canadian labour market: How likely are they to be working in their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What is their likelihood of having employment earnings at or above the median level of earnings associated with the occupation corresponding best to their field of study?

    Different aspects are taken into account when examining these labour market outcomes. These include the time elapsed since landing, region of education, type of credential, as well as diverse socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, age group, marital status, presence of children, province, territory and area of residence, language ability, and visible minority status. Results for internationally-educated immigrant paid workers are compared to their counterparts with a postsecondary credential earned in Canada and to the Canadian-born paid workers with a postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011337
    Description:

    Over the last three decades, Canada has experienced three recessions: one that started during the early 1980s; a second that began during the early 1990s; and the most recent one, which led to employment declines starting in October 2008. For each recession, this study: a) examines which workers were laid-off; b) quantifies layoff rates; and c) assesses the proportion of workers that found a job shortly after being laid-off. The layoff concept used includes temporary layoffs as well as permanent layoffs.

    Release date: 2011-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311538
    Description:

    This article examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). Though data are available for all 22 major trade groups, this article focuses on the top four in terms of total number of apprentices in 2009: electricians, carpenters, automotive service technicians, and plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters. The analysis first looks at trends in the total number of apprenticeship registrations for each of these four major trade groups and then discusses trends in new registrations, completions and discontinuations.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011093
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2006 Census of Population to examine the extent to which the location completion of highest postsecondary diploma/degree completion affects the relative labour market success of immigrants to in Canada. Using descriptive and multivariate techniques, different immigrant cohorts are compared to the Canadian-born with respect to labour force status, earnings and the match between occupation and required schooling. In line with prior Canadian research, we find that in comparison with the Canadian-born, immigrants, especially very-recent immigrants, are more likely to be out of the labour force and less likely to be paid employees, even after accounting for a set of pertinent variables drawn from prior research. When employed, they are much more likely to be overeducated and less likely to be correctly matched or self-employed. They are also more likely to face an earnings disadvantage in Canada's labour markets. Location of study plays a role. Those who completed their postsecondary education in the United Kingdom, France, the United States or, to some extent in Germany, were much more likely to do well on Canada's labour markets in terms of employment ratios and earnings, regardless of immigration cohort, compared to those who completed their postsecondary studies in any other foreign country, especially China, the Russian Federation, Pakistan or South Korea. This finding leads us to conclude that many prospective employers who use education to assess the potential productivity of prospective labour market participants may perceive the 'outcomes' of the British, American, French and German postsecondary education systems as having components that are more easily transferable to Canada than the 'outcomes' of the Chinese, Russian Federation, Pakistani and South Korean postsecondary education systems. Our results lend support to the idea that many Canadian employers and several other stakeholders (such as regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, etc.) may not value postsecondary educational qualifications from all source regions equally.

    Release date: 2011-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011091
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2010/2011. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2011. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

Data (16)

Data (16) (16 of 16 results)

Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (25 of 36 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011096
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2009/2010. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2011-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201101211611
    Description:

    This paper reviews trends in the labour force participation rate from 1997 to the third quarter of 2011 and explores possible explanations as to why the participation rate was no longer increasing even before the onset of the 2008-2009 recession.

    Release date: 2011-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2011003
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the labour market outcomes of Aboriginal people during and after the labour market downturn. It covers the period of 2008 to 2010, using annual averages by several demographic and labour market activity indicators available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). It is divided by age group, as well as, when possible, by the Aboriginal identity groups: First Nations people living off-reserve and Métis. The Inuit population are included in the Aboriginal total but not separately as most estimates for this group were not reliable. The report also distinguishes Aboriginal labour market outcomes by gender, province or region and job characteristics such as industry, occupation, hours worked and highest level of education attained.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411593
    Description:

    Following an economic shock affecting a city or region, many residents - particularly those who have just lost their jobs - will likely look to migrate to another region to improve their economic situation. This study uses data from the 1997 to 2008 Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to evaluate the impact of regional economic shocks on the migration of residents. In particular, it examines the extent to which a deterioration in the relative economic position of a region and a decrease in personal income are linked to higher probabilities of migration.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411579
    Description:

    This update provides unionization rates for 2010 and the first half of 2011. It also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011094
    Description:

    Unlike the waves of immigrants who arrived in the 1950s and 1960s, those arriving in Canada since the 1970s have possessed relatively high educational levels, making an enormous contribution to the pool of individuals in Canada with postsecondary qualifications. Upon their arrival however, many immigrants initially face difficulties finding employment related to their field of study as well as finding jobs that pay relatively high wages.

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, the report presents a profile of internationally-educated paid workers and focus on the different characteristics and determinants more closely associated with an easier integration in the Canadian labour market: How likely are they to be working in their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What is their likelihood of having employment earnings at or above the median level of earnings associated with the occupation corresponding best to their field of study?

    Different aspects are taken into account when examining these labour market outcomes. These include the time elapsed since landing, region of education, type of credential, as well as diverse socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, age group, marital status, presence of children, province, territory and area of residence, language ability, and visible minority status. Results for internationally-educated immigrant paid workers are compared to their counterparts with a postsecondary credential earned in Canada and to the Canadian-born paid workers with a postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011337
    Description:

    Over the last three decades, Canada has experienced three recessions: one that started during the early 1980s; a second that began during the early 1990s; and the most recent one, which led to employment declines starting in October 2008. For each recession, this study: a) examines which workers were laid-off; b) quantifies layoff rates; and c) assesses the proportion of workers that found a job shortly after being laid-off. The layoff concept used includes temporary layoffs as well as permanent layoffs.

    Release date: 2011-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311538
    Description:

    This article examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). Though data are available for all 22 major trade groups, this article focuses on the top four in terms of total number of apprentices in 2009: electricians, carpenters, automotive service technicians, and plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters. The analysis first looks at trends in the total number of apprenticeship registrations for each of these four major trade groups and then discusses trends in new registrations, completions and discontinuations.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011093
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2006 Census of Population to examine the extent to which the location completion of highest postsecondary diploma/degree completion affects the relative labour market success of immigrants to in Canada. Using descriptive and multivariate techniques, different immigrant cohorts are compared to the Canadian-born with respect to labour force status, earnings and the match between occupation and required schooling. In line with prior Canadian research, we find that in comparison with the Canadian-born, immigrants, especially very-recent immigrants, are more likely to be out of the labour force and less likely to be paid employees, even after accounting for a set of pertinent variables drawn from prior research. When employed, they are much more likely to be overeducated and less likely to be correctly matched or self-employed. They are also more likely to face an earnings disadvantage in Canada's labour markets. Location of study plays a role. Those who completed their postsecondary education in the United Kingdom, France, the United States or, to some extent in Germany, were much more likely to do well on Canada's labour markets in terms of employment ratios and earnings, regardless of immigration cohort, compared to those who completed their postsecondary studies in any other foreign country, especially China, the Russian Federation, Pakistan or South Korea. This finding leads us to conclude that many prospective employers who use education to assess the potential productivity of prospective labour market participants may perceive the 'outcomes' of the British, American, French and German postsecondary education systems as having components that are more easily transferable to Canada than the 'outcomes' of the Chinese, Russian Federation, Pakistani and South Korean postsecondary education systems. Our results lend support to the idea that many Canadian employers and several other stakeholders (such as regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, etc.) may not value postsecondary educational qualifications from all source regions equally.

    Release date: 2011-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011091
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2010/2011. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2011. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

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