Statistics by subject – Labour

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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013002
    Description:

    This article examines the social participation of full-time workers, both formal (i.e., volunteering for organizations) and informal (i.e., helping friends, neighbours). We also look at relatively unexplored factors of social participation, such as flexibility of working conditions, commuting time and worker categories.

    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-584-G
    Description:

    This book introduces technical aspects of the Statistics Canada Total Work Accounts System (TWAS). The TWAS is designed to facilitate the analysis of issues that require simultaneous consideration of both paid work and unpaid productive work. Its key contribution is to allocate the deemed output of each episode of unpaid work activity to a specific beneficiary or group of beneficiaries (called "destinations"). The guide presents the criteria used to decide the allocation of each work episode to one of the destinations, as well as the pseudo code for DESTIN, the key variable of the System. This pseudo code allows programmers to quickly create the actual programming code needed to derive the DESTIN variable in their own microdata files of diary-based time-use records. The guide also discusses illustrative applications of the System, as well as its key limitations.

    Release date: 2002-02-12

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Analysis (6)

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013002
    Description:

    This article examines the social participation of full-time workers, both formal (i.e., volunteering for organizations) and informal (i.e., helping friends, neighbours). We also look at relatively unexplored factors of social participation, such as flexibility of working conditions, commuting time and worker categories.

    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-584-G
    Description:

    This book introduces technical aspects of the Statistics Canada Total Work Accounts System (TWAS). The TWAS is designed to facilitate the analysis of issues that require simultaneous consideration of both paid work and unpaid productive work. Its key contribution is to allocate the deemed output of each episode of unpaid work activity to a specific beneficiary or group of beneficiaries (called "destinations"). The guide presents the criteria used to decide the allocation of each work episode to one of the destinations, as well as the pseudo code for DESTIN, the key variable of the System. This pseudo code allows programmers to quickly create the actual programming code needed to derive the DESTIN variable in their own microdata files of diary-based time-use records. The guide also discusses illustrative applications of the System, as well as its key limitations.

    Release date: 2002-02-12

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