Statistics by subject – Languages

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-657-X
    Description:

    This thematic series groups different statistical products related to ethnicity, languages, and immigration. It features analytical documents of varying scopes, such as population profiles, reference materials, data products (including tables and factsheets), among other document types.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-642-X
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Canada was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Canada based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-655-X
    Description:

    Many of the 60 or so Aboriginal languages in Canada are considered endangered to varying degrees for their long-term survival. Assessing language vitality or endangerment through the measurement of various factors can provide useful information to help ensure the continuity of a language. This paper illustrates how the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) can be used to measure some of the factors that provide information related to the vitality of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2014-10-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-549-X
    Description:

    The main objective of this document is to raise awareness among Statistics Canada data users of the different sources of language data available at Statistics Canada. Along with the census, surveys with an important sample of official-language minority groups and/or with information on languages are listed by themes. Users will find a description of the survey and its target population, sample sizes (total and according to available linguistic characteristics), available language variables based on questions asked, date of the first release, year for which the data is available and a direct internet link to additional information on the various surveys.

    Release date: 2013-05-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-651-X
    Description:

    This article presents employment and unemployment rates, and some information regarding salaries and industrial sectors of employees, for official-language minorities. These data are based on the Labour Force Survey and enable comparisons between official-language minority and majority according to their situation in the labour market for provinces or groups of provinces.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-550-X
    Description:

    This is an analytical report on Services to Official-Language Minorities by Health Professionals. This report explores the availability of health professionals who can work in either official language to serve the needs of official language minorities and compares the number of those professionals with the distribution of minority and majority populations in each region of the country.

    Release date: 2009-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 12F0089X
    Description:

    This special study, conducted on behalf of Treasury Board Secretariat, was designed to collect information on the use of both official languages at work in the bilingual regions of Québec. The 2,100 federal employees contacted for the study were asked about their communications with their headquarters, and with central agencies. Communications through various media, such as telephone, e-mail and fax, were examined, as well as draft documents and participation in meetings.

    Release date: 2001-08-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-573-X
    Description:

    The international Adult Literacy Survey of 1994 is an important source of information about the literacy levels of Canadians as well as the factors that can explain the disparities between certain sub-populations. The current study shows and tries to explain some of the disparities between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

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Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-657-X
    Description:

    This thematic series groups different statistical products related to ethnicity, languages, and immigration. It features analytical documents of varying scopes, such as population profiles, reference materials, data products (including tables and factsheets), among other document types.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-642-X
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Canada was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Canada based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-655-X
    Description:

    Many of the 60 or so Aboriginal languages in Canada are considered endangered to varying degrees for their long-term survival. Assessing language vitality or endangerment through the measurement of various factors can provide useful information to help ensure the continuity of a language. This paper illustrates how the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) can be used to measure some of the factors that provide information related to the vitality of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2014-10-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-549-X
    Description:

    The main objective of this document is to raise awareness among Statistics Canada data users of the different sources of language data available at Statistics Canada. Along with the census, surveys with an important sample of official-language minority groups and/or with information on languages are listed by themes. Users will find a description of the survey and its target population, sample sizes (total and according to available linguistic characteristics), available language variables based on questions asked, date of the first release, year for which the data is available and a direct internet link to additional information on the various surveys.

    Release date: 2013-05-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-651-X
    Description:

    This article presents employment and unemployment rates, and some information regarding salaries and industrial sectors of employees, for official-language minorities. These data are based on the Labour Force Survey and enable comparisons between official-language minority and majority according to their situation in the labour market for provinces or groups of provinces.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-550-X
    Description:

    This is an analytical report on Services to Official-Language Minorities by Health Professionals. This report explores the availability of health professionals who can work in either official language to serve the needs of official language minorities and compares the number of those professionals with the distribution of minority and majority populations in each region of the country.

    Release date: 2009-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 12F0089X
    Description:

    This special study, conducted on behalf of Treasury Board Secretariat, was designed to collect information on the use of both official languages at work in the bilingual regions of Québec. The 2,100 federal employees contacted for the study were asked about their communications with their headquarters, and with central agencies. Communications through various media, such as telephone, e-mail and fax, were examined, as well as draft documents and participation in meetings.

    Release date: 2001-08-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-573-X
    Description:

    The international Adult Literacy Survey of 1994 is an important source of information about the literacy levels of Canadians as well as the factors that can explain the disparities between certain sub-populations. The current study shows and tries to explain some of the disparities between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

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