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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2015012
    Description:

    This study examines the language practices of children from minority francophone communities outside Quebec. It describes children’s language practices and identifies the key factors in the predominant use of French or English in their personal, extracurricular and leisure activities. These activities include watching television, using the Internet, participating in organized sports and non-sport activities, and reading. The analyses and results presented use data from the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM), conducted by Statistics Canada in 2006.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-642-X
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Canada was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Canada based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012011
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Newfoundland and Labrador was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the eleventh of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Newfoundland and Labrador contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012010
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Prince Edward Island was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the tenth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Prince Edward Island contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012009
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Nova Scotia was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the ninth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Nova Scotia contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related. Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012008
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Manitoba was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the eighth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Manitoba contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011007
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Alberta was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the seventh of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Alberta contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2011-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011006
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Saskatchewan was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the sixth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Release date: 2011-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011092
    Description:

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is designed to provide policy-oriented indicators of the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. PISA data shed light on a range of factors that contribute to successful students, schools and education systems. This report summarises the results from PISA 2009 for students in the minority-language school systems in Canada within the 7 provinces that reported data for both their English and French language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The purpose of the following analyses was to develop a profile of minority-language students in Canada (French outside of Quebec, English in Quebec) and the schools they attend.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011005
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in New Brunswick was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the fifth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Release date: 2011-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011004
    Description:

    Background Notes This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in British Columbia was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and Justice Canada. It is the fourth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Data sources This portrait of the French-speaking population in British Columbia contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada.

    Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2011-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011003
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Public use microdata: 89M0028X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely English-speakers in Quebec and French-speakers outside Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on priority issues such as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home.

    The survey's target population consists of two groups: persons under the age of 18 in households where at least one parent belongs to the official-language minority and persons aged 18 and over who belong to the official-language minority in the ten provinces and the three territories. Persons living in collective dwellings and on Indian reserves are excluded.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Table: 91-548-X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely anglophones in Quebec and francophones outside of Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on subjects as diverse as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home. Note to readers

    The following section has been modified as of May 27, 2008:Section 5.1.3 Reasons for choosing the school attended:Percentages in paragraphs 3 and 4Edition 2006 was previously released on December 11, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0028X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely English-speakers in Quebec and French-speakers outside Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on priority issues such as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home.

    The survey's target population consists of two groups: persons under the age of 18 in households where at least one parent belongs to the official-language minority and persons aged 18 and over who belong to the official-language minority in the ten provinces and the three territories. Persons living in collective dwellings and on Indian reserves are excluded.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Table: 91-548-X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely anglophones in Quebec and francophones outside of Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on subjects as diverse as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home. Note to readers

    The following section has been modified as of May 27, 2008:Section 5.1.3 Reasons for choosing the school attended:Percentages in paragraphs 3 and 4Edition 2006 was previously released on December 11, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2015012
    Description:

    This study examines the language practices of children from minority francophone communities outside Quebec. It describes children’s language practices and identifies the key factors in the predominant use of French or English in their personal, extracurricular and leisure activities. These activities include watching television, using the Internet, participating in organized sports and non-sport activities, and reading. The analyses and results presented use data from the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM), conducted by Statistics Canada in 2006.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-642-X
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Canada was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Canada based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012011
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Newfoundland and Labrador was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the eleventh of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Newfoundland and Labrador contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012010
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Prince Edward Island was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the tenth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Prince Edward Island contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012009
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Nova Scotia was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the ninth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Nova Scotia contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related. Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2012008
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Manitoba was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the eighth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Manitoba contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011007
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Alberta was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the seventh of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This portrait of the French-speaking population in Alberta contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada. Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2011-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011006
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Saskatchewan was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the sixth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Release date: 2011-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011092
    Description:

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is designed to provide policy-oriented indicators of the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. PISA data shed light on a range of factors that contribute to successful students, schools and education systems. This report summarises the results from PISA 2009 for students in the minority-language school systems in Canada within the 7 provinces that reported data for both their English and French language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The purpose of the following analyses was to develop a profile of minority-language students in Canada (French outside of Quebec, English in Quebec) and the schools they attend.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011005
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in New Brunswick was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Department of Justice Canada. It is the fifth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Release date: 2011-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011004
    Description:

    Background Notes This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in British Columbia was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and Justice Canada. It is the fourth of a series of portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    Data sources This portrait of the French-speaking population in British Columbia contains information drawn from Canadian censuses from 1951 to 2006 and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM) conducted in 2006 by Statistics Canada.

    Census: The census data contained in this report are drawn from the long census questionnaire, completed by 20% of households and including 61 questions of which 7 are language-related.

    Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM): This is a cross-sectional sample survey. Respondents to the (SVOLM) are selected from the sample of persons who completed the long questionnaire in the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2011-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2011003
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

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