Statistics by subject – Manufacturing

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All (12)

All (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050128972
    Description:

    A profile of the fastest-growing sector in wholesale trade.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050128971
    Description:

    Most of the recent gap between shipments growth in Canada and the US reflects lower prices due to the exchange rate.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005009
    Description:

    This paper examines two potential benefits of foreign-controlled plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector: the superior performance of foreign-controlled plants and their productivity spillovers to domestic plants. The paper finds that foreign-controlled plants are more productive, more innovative, more technology intensive, pay higher wages and use more skilled workers. This foreign-ownership advantage is found to be a multinational advantage. What matters for economic performance is whether plants belong to multinational enterprises (MNEs) rather than ownership per se. Canadian multinationals are as productive as foreign multinationals. We also find that MNEs have accounted for a disproportionately large share of productivity growth in the last two decades. Finally, we find robust evidence for productivity spillovers from foreign-controlled plants to domestic-controlled plants arising from increased competition and greater use of new technologies among domestic plants.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005075
    Description:

    This paper presents research carried out to determine the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry and investigates the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry from the perspective of output price, market structure, and productivity performance. The main objective of the research is to estimate the degree of competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing sector related to its U.S. counterpart during the ten-year period from 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005016
    Description:

    The main indicators of functional food and nutraceutical activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2003 Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals Survey which was designed to provide a benchmark measurement of the industry and a better understanding of the scope and nature of the sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005033
    Description:

    Plant deaths arise from failure when firms exit an industry. Plant deaths are also associated with renewal when incumbent firms close down plants and modernize their production facilities and start-up new plants.

    The rate of plant deaths affects the amount of change that occurs in labour and capital markets. Plant deaths result in job losses and incur significant human costs as employees are forced to seek other work. The death process also gives rise to capital losses - to the loss of earlier investments that the industrial system had made in productive capacity. This paper makes use of the plant-death date to provide new information on the likely length of life of capital invested in plants.

    This paper measures the death rate over a forty year period for new plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It develops a profile of the death rate for entrants as they age. On average, 14% of new plants die in their first year. Over half of new plants die by the age of six. By the age of 15, less than 20% are still alive.

    As a result, manufacturing plants have relatively short lives. The average new plant lives only nine years (17 years if the average is employment-weighted). These rates vary by industry. The longest length of life (13 years) can be found in two industries -primary metals and paper and allied products. The shortest average length of life (less than 8 years) occurs in wood industries.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005025
    Description:

    This study examines the performance of key industries in the manufacturing sector in each province in 2004, and the major factors influencing each.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005022
    Description:

    This article investigates trends in international trade, production and employment in the textile and clothing industries, from 1992 to 2004. It also examines patterns of trade in textiles and clothing.

    Release date: 2005-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037804
    Description:

    A profile of jobs, productivity, output and trade in these industries as they enter a new trade era without import quotas.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005020
    Description:

    This study examines production and sales trends in automotive and light duty vehicle manufacturing in Canada and the United States from 1999 to 2004. It focuses on production and sales of sport utility vehicles.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005029
    Description:

    This paper uses a detailed industry-level data base of industry prices in the manufacturing sector in Canada and the United States to investigate whether prices are co-integrated in the two countries and whether the relationship between the two sets of prices follows the law of one price. We find that aggregate Canadian price movements track U.S. price movements closely, but not perfectly, in the long run. But there are substantial deviations from the law of one price in the short run. Moreover, many individual industries deviate from the law of one price. These deviations are related to the degree of tariff protection and to the degree of product differentiation at the industry level.

    Release date: 2005-02-15

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050128972
    Description:

    A profile of the fastest-growing sector in wholesale trade.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050128971
    Description:

    Most of the recent gap between shipments growth in Canada and the US reflects lower prices due to the exchange rate.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005009
    Description:

    This paper examines two potential benefits of foreign-controlled plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector: the superior performance of foreign-controlled plants and their productivity spillovers to domestic plants. The paper finds that foreign-controlled plants are more productive, more innovative, more technology intensive, pay higher wages and use more skilled workers. This foreign-ownership advantage is found to be a multinational advantage. What matters for economic performance is whether plants belong to multinational enterprises (MNEs) rather than ownership per se. Canadian multinationals are as productive as foreign multinationals. We also find that MNEs have accounted for a disproportionately large share of productivity growth in the last two decades. Finally, we find robust evidence for productivity spillovers from foreign-controlled plants to domestic-controlled plants arising from increased competition and greater use of new technologies among domestic plants.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005033
    Description:

    Plant deaths arise from failure when firms exit an industry. Plant deaths are also associated with renewal when incumbent firms close down plants and modernize their production facilities and start-up new plants.

    The rate of plant deaths affects the amount of change that occurs in labour and capital markets. Plant deaths result in job losses and incur significant human costs as employees are forced to seek other work. The death process also gives rise to capital losses - to the loss of earlier investments that the industrial system had made in productive capacity. This paper makes use of the plant-death date to provide new information on the likely length of life of capital invested in plants.

    This paper measures the death rate over a forty year period for new plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It develops a profile of the death rate for entrants as they age. On average, 14% of new plants die in their first year. Over half of new plants die by the age of six. By the age of 15, less than 20% are still alive.

    As a result, manufacturing plants have relatively short lives. The average new plant lives only nine years (17 years if the average is employment-weighted). These rates vary by industry. The longest length of life (13 years) can be found in two industries -primary metals and paper and allied products. The shortest average length of life (less than 8 years) occurs in wood industries.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005025
    Description:

    This study examines the performance of key industries in the manufacturing sector in each province in 2004, and the major factors influencing each.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005022
    Description:

    This article investigates trends in international trade, production and employment in the textile and clothing industries, from 1992 to 2004. It also examines patterns of trade in textiles and clothing.

    Release date: 2005-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037804
    Description:

    A profile of jobs, productivity, output and trade in these industries as they enter a new trade era without import quotas.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005020
    Description:

    This study examines production and sales trends in automotive and light duty vehicle manufacturing in Canada and the United States from 1999 to 2004. It focuses on production and sales of sport utility vehicles.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005029
    Description:

    This paper uses a detailed industry-level data base of industry prices in the manufacturing sector in Canada and the United States to investigate whether prices are co-integrated in the two countries and whether the relationship between the two sets of prices follows the law of one price. We find that aggregate Canadian price movements track U.S. price movements closely, but not perfectly, in the long run. But there are substantial deviations from the law of one price in the short run. Moreover, many individual industries deviate from the law of one price. These deviations are related to the degree of tariff protection and to the degree of product differentiation at the industry level.

    Release date: 2005-02-15

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

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