Statistics by subject – Manufacturing

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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900810917
    Description:

    Manufacturing's share of nominal GDP has fallen over the last half century due to lower relative prices in Canada, not a declining volume of production. These price declines reflect productivity growth, while also lowered the share of manufacturing in employment. Canada's manufacturing structure shifted to mirror the United States after free trade was introduced in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009057
    Description:

    This paper examines the challenges that the manufacturing sector has faced over the last half century focusing on both long- and short-term performance. It first examines whether there is evidence that this sector is in long-term decline. The paper also investigates how the industry has responded to specific shocks during this period from exchange-rate movements, trade liberalization and business cycles. It finds little evidence of long-term decline. Rather it describes how manufacturing has adapted to varying challenges, whether from demand shifts due to business cycles, relative price shifts associated with exchange rate shocks or changes in tariff regimes.

    Release date: 2009-07-28

  • Table: 23F0001X
    Description:

    Canada Food Statsis an easy-to-use application that is available on a CD-ROM or as a database that can be downloaded directly to your desktop. The product provides access to a broad spectrum of food statistics and indicators. It contains information on per capita food availability for consumption and food prices, nutrition, supply and demand, as well as data on the food industry, processing, employment, productivity, trade and much more. The product provides users with easy access to large volumes of data, access to pre-defined tables or the ability to query the database and create unique tabulations.

    Release date: 2009-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009077
    Description:

    This study reviews status and trends for the manufacturing sector in 2008. It analyses major regional and industry shifts in production and put them in the context of major socio-economic drivers such as domestic demand, prices and exports. Employment, investment, productivity and profitability indicators are also presented.

    Release date: 2009-04-29

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 23F0001X
    Description:

    Canada Food Statsis an easy-to-use application that is available on a CD-ROM or as a database that can be downloaded directly to your desktop. The product provides access to a broad spectrum of food statistics and indicators. It contains information on per capita food availability for consumption and food prices, nutrition, supply and demand, as well as data on the food industry, processing, employment, productivity, trade and much more. The product provides users with easy access to large volumes of data, access to pre-defined tables or the ability to query the database and create unique tabulations.

    Release date: 2009-06-25

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900810917
    Description:

    Manufacturing's share of nominal GDP has fallen over the last half century due to lower relative prices in Canada, not a declining volume of production. These price declines reflect productivity growth, while also lowered the share of manufacturing in employment. Canada's manufacturing structure shifted to mirror the United States after free trade was introduced in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009057
    Description:

    This paper examines the challenges that the manufacturing sector has faced over the last half century focusing on both long- and short-term performance. It first examines whether there is evidence that this sector is in long-term decline. The paper also investigates how the industry has responded to specific shocks during this period from exchange-rate movements, trade liberalization and business cycles. It finds little evidence of long-term decline. Rather it describes how manufacturing has adapted to varying challenges, whether from demand shifts due to business cycles, relative price shifts associated with exchange rate shocks or changes in tariff regimes.

    Release date: 2009-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009077
    Description:

    This study reviews status and trends for the manufacturing sector in 2008. It analyses major regional and industry shifts in production and put them in the context of major socio-economic drivers such as domestic demand, prices and exports. Employment, investment, productivity and profitability indicators are also presented.

    Release date: 2009-04-29

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

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