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All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000004
    Description:

    Up to and including the 1996 Census, the enumeration area (EA) served as both the primary collection area and the basic dissemination area. Optimising both the collection and dissemination functions was a difficult undertaking and compromises were made. For the 2001 Census, the new digital cartographic file called the National Geographic Base (NGB) and the block program have made it possible to create separate enumeration areas for data collection and dissemination areas for data dissemination. This working paper describes the design criteria that have been specified for the implementation of the dissemination area (DA). These criteria address the improvements most frequently requested by users such as increased temporal stability, reduced area suppression, intuitive boundaries, compactness and homogeneity. In addition to integrating and reflecting the recommendations from the user community, the dissemination area design incorporates operational factors related to the DA code structure, maximum code size and production timeframes.

    NOTE: This working paper was first released in March 2000 and described the design criteria and their parameters that were being considered for creating the dissemination area (DA) for the 2001 Census. Since that time, the design criteria have been finalised. New information is highlighted as "Updates" in this version of the paper (June 2001). The remainder of the paper is the same as the version released in March 2000.

    Release date: 2000-03-13

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000003
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's interest in a common delineation of the north for statistical analysis purposes evolved from research to devise a classification to further differentiate the largely rural and remote areas that make up 96% of Canada's land area. That research led to the establishment of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept. When applied to census subdivisions, the MIZ categories did not work as well in northern areas as in the south. Therefore, the Geography Division set out to determine a north-south divide that would differentiate the north from the south independent of any standard geographic area boundaries.

    This working paper describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada to separate the north from the south, as well as lines marking transition zones on both sides of the north-south line. It also describes the indicators selected to derive the north-south line and makes comparisons to alternative definitions of the north. The resulting classification of the north complements the MIZ classification. Together, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, MIZ and the North form a new Statistical Area Classification (SAC) for Canada.

    Two related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) provide further details about the MIZ classification. Working paper no. 2000-1 (92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and includes tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories, and working paper no. 2000-2 (92F0138MPE00002) describes the methodology used to define the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000002
    Description:

    This working paper provides an overview of census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones, or MIZ, their background and the methodology used to define them. The MIZ classification is an approach to better differentiate areas of Canada outside of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA). Census subdivisions that lie outside these areas are classified into one of four zones of influence ranging from "strong" to "no" influence according to the degree of influence that CMA/CAs have on them. The MIZ classification fills a gap in Statistics Canada's geographic framework and promotes data integration since we expect it will be possible to obtain survey data as well as census data based on the same geographic structure. Studies done with a preliminary version of MIZ showed the potential of MIZ to reveal the diversity of non-metropolitan Canada. Based on feedback received on that initial research, this working paper reports on more recent work that has been done to refine the number and data breakpoints for MIZ categories and to examine the additional variables of distances between census subdivisions (CSDs), physical adjacency and a north-south allocation.

    This is the second in a series of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) that describe a new statistical area classification that includes census metropolitan areas/census agglomerations, MIZ and the North concept. The first working paper (no. 2000-1, 92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and provides tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the North concept and the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1995028
    Description:

    This paper outlines the process of delineating the agricultural land base (ecumene) in Canada based on data from the 1991 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2000-01-27

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999042
    Description:

    This paper reconstructs the development and evolution of the Canadian agricultural statistical system. It describes the expanding and increasingly important role of administrative data, which is integrated into survey and census information in order to complement, supplement or replace survey information or to assist with frame maintenance.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

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Reference (6)

Reference (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000004
    Description:

    Up to and including the 1996 Census, the enumeration area (EA) served as both the primary collection area and the basic dissemination area. Optimising both the collection and dissemination functions was a difficult undertaking and compromises were made. For the 2001 Census, the new digital cartographic file called the National Geographic Base (NGB) and the block program have made it possible to create separate enumeration areas for data collection and dissemination areas for data dissemination. This working paper describes the design criteria that have been specified for the implementation of the dissemination area (DA). These criteria address the improvements most frequently requested by users such as increased temporal stability, reduced area suppression, intuitive boundaries, compactness and homogeneity. In addition to integrating and reflecting the recommendations from the user community, the dissemination area design incorporates operational factors related to the DA code structure, maximum code size and production timeframes.

    NOTE: This working paper was first released in March 2000 and described the design criteria and their parameters that were being considered for creating the dissemination area (DA) for the 2001 Census. Since that time, the design criteria have been finalised. New information is highlighted as "Updates" in this version of the paper (June 2001). The remainder of the paper is the same as the version released in March 2000.

    Release date: 2000-03-13

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000003
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's interest in a common delineation of the north for statistical analysis purposes evolved from research to devise a classification to further differentiate the largely rural and remote areas that make up 96% of Canada's land area. That research led to the establishment of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept. When applied to census subdivisions, the MIZ categories did not work as well in northern areas as in the south. Therefore, the Geography Division set out to determine a north-south divide that would differentiate the north from the south independent of any standard geographic area boundaries.

    This working paper describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada to separate the north from the south, as well as lines marking transition zones on both sides of the north-south line. It also describes the indicators selected to derive the north-south line and makes comparisons to alternative definitions of the north. The resulting classification of the north complements the MIZ classification. Together, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, MIZ and the North form a new Statistical Area Classification (SAC) for Canada.

    Two related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) provide further details about the MIZ classification. Working paper no. 2000-1 (92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and includes tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories, and working paper no. 2000-2 (92F0138MPE00002) describes the methodology used to define the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2000002
    Description:

    This working paper provides an overview of census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones, or MIZ, their background and the methodology used to define them. The MIZ classification is an approach to better differentiate areas of Canada outside of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA). Census subdivisions that lie outside these areas are classified into one of four zones of influence ranging from "strong" to "no" influence according to the degree of influence that CMA/CAs have on them. The MIZ classification fills a gap in Statistics Canada's geographic framework and promotes data integration since we expect it will be possible to obtain survey data as well as census data based on the same geographic structure. Studies done with a preliminary version of MIZ showed the potential of MIZ to reveal the diversity of non-metropolitan Canada. Based on feedback received on that initial research, this working paper reports on more recent work that has been done to refine the number and data breakpoints for MIZ categories and to examine the additional variables of distances between census subdivisions (CSDs), physical adjacency and a north-south allocation.

    This is the second in a series of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) that describe a new statistical area classification that includes census metropolitan areas/census agglomerations, MIZ and the North concept. The first working paper (no. 2000-1, 92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and provides tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the North concept and the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1995028
    Description:

    This paper outlines the process of delineating the agricultural land base (ecumene) in Canada based on data from the 1991 Census of Agriculture.

    Release date: 2000-01-27

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999042
    Description:

    This paper reconstructs the development and evolution of the Canadian agricultural statistical system. It describes the expanding and increasingly important role of administrative data, which is integrated into survey and census information in order to complement, supplement or replace survey information or to assist with frame maintenance.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

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