Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019491
    Description:

    Evaluating the impact of changes to services on the health status of frail elderly adults calls for longitudinal studies. Many subjects are however lost during follow-up because of the high incidence of death in this population. Traditional methods of repeated measures analysis are thus inappropriate since they ignore subjects with incomplete follow-up data. This leads to a considerable reduction in sample size and to biases.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410213113
    Description:

    Why are so many seniors still at work? Some enjoy their job and intend on working indefinitely, while others feel forced to work for economic reasons. The 2001 Census is used to update an earlier study focussing on the occupations of seniors who continue to work beyond the age of 65, the traditional age of retirement.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046496
    Description:

    This article examines violence committed against senior citizens, using self-reported data from the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213084
    Description:

    This paper looks at the availability of qualified workers as baby boomers retire, a key challenge facing employers over the first decades of the 21st century. It also examines which industries and occupations may be affected more than others.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006456
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126037
    Description:

    This report focuses on employer pension plan assets, together with other private pension assets such as registered retirement savings plans. It also presents estimates of net worth, including the value of employer pension plan benefits.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19970004871
    Description:

    During the century now coming to a close, the structure of Canada's population has changed, chiefly as a result of the slow decline in fertility, which has narrowed the base of the age pyramid and broadened its peak. This steady evolution was interrupted for about 20 years by a still-unexplained phenomenon - the baby boom. Between 1946 and 1965, fertility and natality hit levels considered irretrievably lost, resulting in the famous explosion of births.

    Release date: 1998-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006456
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410213113
    Description:

    Why are so many seniors still at work? Some enjoy their job and intend on working indefinitely, while others feel forced to work for economic reasons. The 2001 Census is used to update an earlier study focussing on the occupations of seniors who continue to work beyond the age of 65, the traditional age of retirement.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046496
    Description:

    This article examines violence committed against senior citizens, using self-reported data from the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213084
    Description:

    This paper looks at the availability of qualified workers as baby boomers retire, a key challenge facing employers over the first decades of the 21st century. It also examines which industries and occupations may be affected more than others.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126037
    Description:

    This report focuses on employer pension plan assets, together with other private pension assets such as registered retirement savings plans. It also presents estimates of net worth, including the value of employer pension plan benefits.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19970004871
    Description:

    During the century now coming to a close, the structure of Canada's population has changed, chiefly as a result of the slow decline in fertility, which has narrowed the base of the age pyramid and broadened its peak. This steady evolution was interrupted for about 20 years by a still-unexplained phenomenon - the baby boom. Between 1946 and 1965, fertility and natality hit levels considered irretrievably lost, resulting in the famous explosion of births.

    Release date: 1998-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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