Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114042
    Description:

    This article provides information about Canadians who need assistance at home or home-care services, but who do not receive any (unmet needs) and about those who already receive assistance or home-care services, but could use more services (partly met needs). The article also examines the possible consequences of the lack of assistance or of home care on the well-being and mental health of Canadians.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311694
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of caregivers with those of their contemporaries who are not caregivers. In addition, the characteristics of the care that caregivers provide are outlined, as are the positive and negatives aspects of caregiving.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000411391
    Description:

    This analysis uses data from the Cognition Module of the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey - Healthy Aging to validate a categorization of levels of cognitive functioning in the household population aged 45 or older.

    Release date: 2010-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913150
    Description:

    The likelihood of returning to paid employment after retirement is influenced by various factors. Although most retirees rejoin the workforce for financial reasons, non-financial considerations are also important. Many in the study who worked full time prior to retirement chose to return on a part-time basis - over one-third of the men and more than half of the women.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028453
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at recent retirees (individuals who retired during the preceding decade and were at least 50 years old when they did so) and their enjoyment of life before and after retirement. A statistical model explores the relationship between enjoyment of retired life and specific individual characteristics (for example, marital status, health and financial wellbeing) while holding the effects of other characteristics constant.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032452
    Description:

    As the population ages, discussion increasingly focuses on how to keep people in the community and out of health care instituions. But when health fails, the only option may be long-term residential care.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114042
    Description:

    This article provides information about Canadians who need assistance at home or home-care services, but who do not receive any (unmet needs) and about those who already receive assistance or home-care services, but could use more services (partly met needs). The article also examines the possible consequences of the lack of assistance or of home care on the well-being and mental health of Canadians.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311694
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of caregivers with those of their contemporaries who are not caregivers. In addition, the characteristics of the care that caregivers provide are outlined, as are the positive and negatives aspects of caregiving.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000411391
    Description:

    This analysis uses data from the Cognition Module of the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey - Healthy Aging to validate a categorization of levels of cognitive functioning in the household population aged 45 or older.

    Release date: 2010-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913150
    Description:

    The likelihood of returning to paid employment after retirement is influenced by various factors. Although most retirees rejoin the workforce for financial reasons, non-financial considerations are also important. Many in the study who worked full time prior to retirement chose to return on a part-time basis - over one-third of the men and more than half of the women.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028453
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at recent retirees (individuals who retired during the preceding decade and were at least 50 years old when they did so) and their enjoyment of life before and after retirement. A statistical model explores the relationship between enjoyment of retired life and specific individual characteristics (for example, marital status, health and financial wellbeing) while holding the effects of other characteristics constant.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032452
    Description:

    As the population ages, discussion increasingly focuses on how to keep people in the community and out of health care instituions. But when health fails, the only option may be long-term residential care.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

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