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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000311289
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this study provides up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of good health, chronic conditions and health-promoting factors among seniors and adults aged 45 to 64.

    Release date: 2010-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010026
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), released by Statistics Canada in December 2009, was designed to collect information about Canadians' knowledge, abilities, and behaviours concerning financial decision-making. In addition to information on approaches to money management and financial planning, the CFCS collected information on issues relevant to current discussions about Canada's retirement income system. For example, retired respondents were asked about their financial standard of living in retirement and whether their retirement income is sufficient to comfortably cover their bills and financial commitments. Working-age Canadians were asked about their financial preparations for retirement. This research note provides highlights on retirement issues using the CFCS.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5146
    Release date: 2010-05-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111133
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009321
    Description:

    Data from the Longitudinal Administrative Data (LAD) base are used to compare the retirement status and earnings replacement rates achieved by individuals who were, and individuals who were not, Registered Pension Plan members in 1991 and/or 1992, when they were in their mid-fifties. Among men in this cohort, the likelihood of being retired at age 70 to 72 was about 4 to 14 percentage points higher among pension plan members than non-members. Data used for the study do not provide information on why RPP non-members tend to retire later than do members. Among retired individuals, earnings replacement rates did not differ significantly between RPP members and non-members.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111022
    Description:

    New data from the Pension Satellite Account show there have been several notable shifts so far this decade in the structure of pension assets. Assets have nearly quadrupled, mostly due to higher investment income. Contributions rose steadily, but barely kept up with the increase in withdrawals as the population aged rapidly.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813234
    Description:

    The probability of receiving GIS benefits is strongly correlated with people's income levels at younger ages, particularly to their earnings in their 40s. Negative labour market and health occurrences, including EI receipt and disability claims, having a low income and the receipt of social assistance benefits increased the probability of GIS receipt, while having an employer pension plan or RRSPs decreased the probability.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713232
    Description:

    The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) was established to provide low-income seniors with extra income. While simplification of the GIS application process and outreach efforts have increased take-up rates, some seniors are still missing out. This update explores the characteristics of eligible non-recipients.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513230
    Description:

    In 2006, 37% of the employed Canadian population was covered by a registered pension plan. Defined benefit plans have historically covered the majority of plan participants. Defined contribution plans have recently become more prominent. This article examines the increased prevalence of such plans in Canada between 1991 and 2006 and the factors influencing this trend.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2008009
    Description:

    In Canada, there has been growing discussion over the aging of the population and other socio-demographic trends which affect the availability of the informal support network of the elderly population. Noting the lower fertility rates of baby boomers, the increased participation of women in the labour force and changing family structure in terms of increased divorce and reconstituted families, assumptions of continued high level assistance from informal support networks - family and friends - are often criticized.

    The main objective of this research is to project the future availability of informal support network to meet the need for assistance in performing everyday activities among the disabled elderly population for the period 2001 to 2031. The research examined both sides - supply and demand - of the projected increases in need for assistance for disabled older persons. Future trends are analyzed in terms of demand for support, (that is, changes in the rates of disability among the elderly population), and supply of informal support, (which is largely related to the extent and composition of the family network). Data from two national surveys, the 1996 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) and the 1996 General Social Survey (GSS), are used to identify factors associated with disability and sources of assistance among the elderly population. These results were entered into Statistics Canada's LifePaths microsimulation model to project the use of informal and formal networks in the future. The model also incorporates three disability scenarios to test the sensitivity of the projections when different assumptions are considered. The implications of these trends on the future need for chronic home care services are discussed.

    The results show that for the period 2001 to 2031, the average annual growth rate of the number of disabled elderly needing assistance could be about 2.5%. However, the sensitivity analysis shows that an improvement in the health of the population could reduce in a non negligible way this growth rate.

    The results also show that, all things being equal, a greater proportion of elderly persons living with a spouse would relieve some of the pressure on the formal network. This positive effect could be dampened in part when joint survivorship is also meaning joint disability.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Table: 89-633-X
    Description:

    Cycle 21 of the 2007 General Social Survey (GSS) was on "Family, Social Support and Retirement". Data were collected over a 9 month period from March to December 2007 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. These tables contain data on the prevalence of care given and received by seniors because of long-term health problems, selected employment consequences of providing care to seniors and self-rated stress experienced by caregivers. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces or regions.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

Data (68)

Data (68) (25 of 68 results)

Analysis (242)

Analysis (242) (25 of 242 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-004-M
    Description:

    The papers in this series cover a variety of topics related to labour statistics. The studies are intended to show recent or historical trends observed with the surveys produced by the Labour statistics Division, i.e. the Labour Force Survey, Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, Employment insurance coverage Survey, survey on Employment insurance statistics as well as administrative data sources. All the papers in this analytical series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2017013
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey and the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to examine the living arrangements and socio-economic conditions of Aboriginal seniors aged 65 years and over living in private households in population centres. A population centre is an area with a population of at least 1,000 persons and no fewer than 400 persons per square kilometre.

    Release date: 2017-03-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114324
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada presents a life course perspective of the physical, mental and social health of girls and women in Canada. It is intended to provide a summary of various aspects of women’s health, based on available recent survey and administrative data, as well as findings from published research papers and reports. It begins with a general overview of female health in Canada - with a look at the social determinants of health and the health of women who are immigrants to Canada - followed by four sections that describe female health in childhood, in adolescence, in adulthood, and at older ages. Each of these sections includes information on various health behaviours, disease and chronic conditions, and mental health. Sexual activity and reproduction are also examined, beginning in adolescence.

    Release date: 2016-03-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-05-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114152
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada introduces selected socio-demographic and ethnocultural characteristics of the female population in Canada. Accounting for approximately half of the population, women and girls are characterized by different historical social and demographic trajectories that distinguish them from men and boys in this country. In order to effectively plan and develop programs and policy directed toward women and girls, it is necessary to understand trends pertaining to population growth and age structure, as well as the consequences of these patterns on population aging and the composition of the population, and how these might vary by sex. Among the topics to be examined in this chapter are the shares of women and girls in the total population, trends by age, including historical comparisons and some regional differences across the provinces and territories. Selected aspects of diversity within the female population will also be presented, including Aboriginal identity, immigrant status and visible minority status, as well as trends related to residential mobility, marital status, language and religion.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

Reference (19)

Reference (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016027
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series presents a detailed profile of working seniors in Canada. It includes information on the work activity levels, sources of income and occupations of senior men and women. Trends over the past two decades are examined.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5013
    Release date: 2017-06-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5203
    Release date: 2015-05-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3210
    Release date: 2012-07-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5146
    Release date: 2010-05-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Technical products: 75-512-X
    Description:

    This book provides technical documentation of variables, methodologies and extended lists of references used in developing the research findings reported in "New Frontiers of Research on Retirement". It will be used around the world by researchers and teachers, as well as by students preparing theses related to patterns of transition to retirement. This documentation is important because a large part of book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019491
    Description:

    Evaluating the impact of changes to services on the health status of frail elderly adults calls for longitudinal studies. Many subjects are however lost during follow-up because of the high incidence of death in this population. Traditional methods of repeated measures analysis are thus inappropriate since they ignore subjects with incomplete follow-up data. This leads to a considerable reduction in sample size and to biases.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This document presents the results of the Pension Plans in Canada Survey as of January 1, 2003. It gives a brief overview of changes over time in the participation of men and women in registered pension plans, the coverage of the labour force by these plans, membership in defined benefit and defined contribution plans, and total contributions paid into these plans. The document also briefly describes retirement compensation arrangements with an analysis covering the period 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5004
    Release date: 2004-03-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5002
    Release date: 2002-07-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2000001
    Description:

    The intent of this document is to provide an inventory of the surveys, databases, publications, articles and work in progress in Statistics Canada that relate to Canada's retirement income programs. The inventory provides information on publications, output and relevant data elements produced by the surveys and databases. It does not provide an exhaustive description of these data sources, but instead focuses on the information that can be used for purposes of researching/analysing retirement income programs. Some of the information contained does not specifically relate to these programs but might be used as a secondary source when doing research in this area.

    Release date: 2000-03-06

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4500
    Release date: 1995-11-30

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