Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004853
    Description:

    At the beginning of this century, a Canadian male could expect to live an average of 47 years and a Canadian female, 50 years. At that time, barely 38% of males and 44% of females reached the respectable age of 65 years. They could then expect to live for roughly another decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034787
    Description:

    This article looks at those Canadians who moved either to provide care to someone with a long-term health problem or to be looked after by someone else.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014844
    Description:

    The chapter revisits the ageing process from the perspective of the golden years, the tarnished years and the uncertain years. The focus is on two key policy areas: income support, and health and social services, During the 1960s, the true golden years of social policy, the Canada Pension Plan and the twin Quebec Pension Plan, as well as the Guaranteed Income Supplement for low-income seniors were introduced (in conjunction with Old Age Security) creating a de facto guaranteed income for the elderly. In 1966, the Canada Assistance Plan, which allowed the federal government to share the cost of welfare and social services with the provinces, was also introduced. However, by the late 1970s, Canada was facing major social and economic problems. The government experienced financial difficulties, resulting in an unprecendented attack on social programs. By the 1980s, spending restraint became the dominant force shapping social policy reform. Governments began to act on long-standing criticisms of social programs and policy makers turned their attention to reining in the costs of income security, health care and social services. CPP reform became a government priority and amendments were made to the Plan in order to restore the confidence of the Canadian public and made the plan more affordable for future generations. Similar changes were made to the QPP resulting in identical contribution rates. There have been significant changes to health and social services as a result of the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) which replaced the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) that allowed Ottawa to share the provincial cost of welfare and social services and the Established Programs Financing (EPF) under which Ottawa contributed to health care and postsecondary education.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014847
    Description:

    This article is intended to trace a portrait of developments in health status in the United States, France, Canada and Quebec, despite the difficulty posed by a lack of consistent tools for measuring morbidity as a whole or restrictions on activities. A review of the data showed a significant decline in mortality over the past few years. This decline was largely attributable to the drop in chronic disease. Developments with respect to morbidity, however, are less certain. Reported morbidity rose in France between 1980 and 1991, while the average number of pathologies among the elderly declined in the United States between 1982 and 1989. Some studies concluded increased life expectancy essentially amounted to an increased number of years lived with disabilities. This means life expectancy free of disabilities would have stagnated. Subsequent American data, however, showed a significant decline in chronic disabilities among cohorts of elderly persons. Between 1981 and 1991 in France, all increased life expectancy resulted in extended life free of disabilities. Quebec experienced substantial overall increased during the 1987-1993 period, although men gained more than women. The additional life span gained was free of moderate or serious disabilities. Life expectancy free of severe disabilities, as with life expectancy, shows similar progress among countries. Only life expectancy free of any form of disability has shown different results according to time periods and countries.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014848
    Description:

    This article examines the change, over the last fifteen years, in the standard of living of Canada's elderly. The text attempts to measure the scope and depth of poverty among the elderly, to draw up a historical profile of seniors' economic status based upon average pre-tax and after-tax income. It examines the inequality in the income distribution within the senior group and compares it with the other age groups. In the assessment of the elderly's standard of living, the author tries to expand the concept of resources by including the largest sources of non-money income. There is also discussion on the problems of insecurity specific to the elderly and the most vulnerable groups. The discussion includes consideration of the effects that changes in the terms of transition to retirement, in evidence over the past fifteen years, have had and are likely to have on the economic well being of the elderly. The last section provides an analysis of the change in seniors' income level according to their specific cohort. The conclusion emphasizes the selective and inherently fragile nature of the progress achieved.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014846
    Description:

    The chapter commences with a brief review of the history of social protection of the elderly in France and the characteristics of the current pension system in order that the reader can have a better understanding of the changes that have taken place in the living conditions of the elderly. Then, the authors introduce a comparison of the elderly's current standard of living with that of the working population. Income differences as well as the standard of living in households of persons over 60 years of age are examined. Lastly, the chapter concludes with a short description of the reality of ageing for persons of advanced age; dependency and isolation remain a major risk often associated with insufficient income in order to be able to cope better with their handicaps.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014849
    Description:

    This chapter is designed to provide the reader with insight into how economic circumstances change over time as people move from working age into, and through, the 'old age' phase of the life cycle. Patterns of change in incomes, levels of consumption, saving or dissaving, as well as other variables are presented in the paper. The level of peak lifetime after-tax income, which was previously attained when the average age of a birth cohort was in the early sixties or late fifties, is now reached when the cohort's average age is in the early fifties. Although the peak has shifted, real incomes have tended to rise from earlier to later cohorts. However, real incomes within a cohort tend to fall sharply as the cohort ages and moves into its sixties and seventies. There is a minor tendency for consumption to decline by less than income as cohorts age. On average, older Canadian households continue to save, and thus increase rather than use up their accumulated wealth, at least into their seventies. A large proportion continue to own their own homes, and most do so free of mortgages. However, lower-income households do not continue to save, and in fact tend to use up their accumulated wealth at older ages, if they have any to use up. The authors emphasize that inflation is a major concern for older cohorts and estimate that a pension without inflation protection commencing at age 65 would almost certainly suffer a loss of purchasing power in excess of 35% by the time the recipient was 80. And with longer life expectancy, cohorts will be subjected to longer periods of exposure to high inflation risks.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014845
    Description:

    This chapter assesses some of the key demographic and social changes affecting British social policy in the field of ageing. In the 1990s, personal care needs of the elderly are overwhelming provided by the family, where one is available. Formal care services are much more likely to be provided to those who live alone and have no family members who live near them or to those whose relatives do not have the skills or capabilities to care for them. However, There are changing attitudes regarding the giving and receiving of care and changing patterns of marriage and partnerships. Older people are moving away from wanting dependence on children, especially when it implies a long-term commitment arising out of a chronic illness or the need to provide personal care. Future trends will be affected by demographic and social changes affecting different age cohorts. Notable among these changes is the move towards both later marriage as well as the increased tendency to live outside any form of partnership. Another is the increased diversity of family forms. The family of the future may become at least as much an advocate for a vulnerable elder as it is a direct care provider. Demography is working hand-in hand with shifts in social and personal preferences.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014851
    Description:

    This chapter aims at using a generational approach to describe the lifestyle of the elderly in the early 1990s. Individuals observed for the purpose of this chapter were born between 1920 and 1936, approximately corresponding to parents of baby boomers. Beyond the positive relationship between the likelihood of institutionalization and an individual's age, marital status also appeared to play a key role. The marked difference between men's and women's life expectancies in private households, combined with a declining propensity of women to remarry after being widowed or divorced, have made elderly women twice as likely to live alone as men. The private households in which the elderly live are most often small, unigenerational family homes. When the household extends beyond this framework, disparities between men and women begin to appear. A man is more likely to cohabit with other generations if his wife was still part of the household. On the other hand, single women are more likely to live alone or with persons to whom they were not related. Women over 65 living within multigenerational households had a greater completed fertility rate than those living in unigenerational households. The fact that mothers of baby boomers are likely to have had a relatively large number of children is thus reassuring concerning their future access to informal support networks. However, we should observe other phenomena that could influence the establishment of informal networks, especially divorce - the increase of which among baby boomers could have a major impact.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014850
    Description:

    The chapter discusses the implications of demographic changes for the family ties of current and future older Canadians, focusing on the extent to which families can sustain support to their older members. Among those aged 65 and over, the likelihood of being married increased between 1981 and 1996. However, while the modal experience for men aged 75 and over is to be married, the modal experience for women of this age is to be widowed. The proportion of divorced or separated individuals rose consistently from 1961 to 1991 for all age groups, with slightly higher percentages among women. Current trends indicate that widowhood will decline and divorce will increase in significance as the basis for being unattached in old age. Major changes in family size include a decline in the percentage of women who are childless or have only one child and who have five or more children. Regarding siblings, most Canadians have at least one brother or sister. Although the proportion of adults with five or more brothers and sisters and with no siblings has declined, there has been an increase in the percentages for those with one to four siblings. Most Canadians do and will have the potential support of siblings in their familial networks. Smaller families, greater geographic dispersion, and higher divorce rates may increase the need for siblings to work together to support their parents and one another.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-570-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this book is to describe the nature, extent and consequences of informal care in Canada to seniors with high care needs. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey provide the basis for discussions of how seniors receiving care compare to other seniors; of the amount and types of care provided to seniors; of the impacts on caregivers of their caring work. Findings are synthesized into a set of issues concerning Canada's informal caregiving resources and the likely costs and benefits of increased demands on those resources.

    Release date: 1999-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X19990044721
    Description:

    As the Internation Year of the Senior Persons winds down, attention on this growing group of consumers will continue well into the next millenium. This event marked the first year that seniors have been recognized by a worldwide designation.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024661
    Description:

    This article looks at the people who are providing care to seniors with a long-term health problem, the factors that influence the amount of time they devote to eldercare and the types of hardships they experience as a result of helping.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024656
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of car use among seniors and highlights differences between those living in urban and rural areas.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034681
    Description:

    As governments have cut back on social and other services, an aging population's need for a strong support structure has grown. Seniors, in fact, have created both a growing market for such services and a potential source of volunteer labour to meet these needs; How involved are seniors in volunteering? What services are they providing? This study examines the volunteer activity of seniors aged 55 and over in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005309
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024601
    Description:

    Increasingly, men past the traditional retirement age (65) are continuing to work. This article examines whether changes in the workplace have accompanied this trend. The variables examined include self-employment, part-time work and flexible work arrangements.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024602
    Description:

    The two principal tax-assisted vehicles for retirement income planning in Canada are registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) and employer-sponsored registered pension plans (RPPs). Using 1996 tax data, this study compares various groups of workers and their retirement saving patterns.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014573
    Description:

    This article examines some of the characteristics that appear to predispose widowed women to live on their own, with particular emphasis on the extent of their contact with family and friends.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014575
    Description:

    This article looks at three-generation households.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999129
    Description:

    While there are many studies on differences in earnings between immigrants and the native-born or among immigrant groups, they ignore the distribution and concentration of income. These aspects are important for understanding the distribution of economic welfare and consumer behaviour among members and hence are policy relevant.

    Using the 1991 Census data, the distribution and concentration of income have been examined among 15 broad birthplace groups for population aged 55 years and over. About 19% of males and 15% of females receive less than half the median income and obtain 5% and 3% of the aggregate income respectively. About 30% of males and 29% of females receive more than one and half times the median income and obtain 61% and59% of aggregate income respectively. About 51% of males and 56% of females who receive incomes between half and one and half times the median income are termed middle-class and their shares of aggregate income amount to 34 and 38% respectively.

    Although, older immigrants aged 55 years and over, as a group, have roughly the same quartile distribution and concentration of income as their Canadian-born counterparts, the birthplace groups differ from each other. The groups coming from the developing regions, that is, the very groups that have lower average annual incomes, also have more inequitable distribution of income than the Canadian-born or their counterparts from the developed regions. Thus, the income distribution is more polarized in the populations from developing regions than in the populations from developed regions or in the Canadian-born population. On average, females receive 45% less income than males, and there is less polarization of income among them than among males regardless of the place of birth. A part of the explanation lies in the receipt of government transfers which tend to equalize rather than polarize incomes, and older women derive higher proportion of their income from government transfers than older men.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044421
    Description:

    This article highlights the key demographic and socio-economic characteristics of seniors in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005309
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004853
    Description:

    At the beginning of this century, a Canadian male could expect to live an average of 47 years and a Canadian female, 50 years. At that time, barely 38% of males and 44% of females reached the respectable age of 65 years. They could then expect to live for roughly another decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034787
    Description:

    This article looks at those Canadians who moved either to provide care to someone with a long-term health problem or to be looked after by someone else.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014844
    Description:

    The chapter revisits the ageing process from the perspective of the golden years, the tarnished years and the uncertain years. The focus is on two key policy areas: income support, and health and social services, During the 1960s, the true golden years of social policy, the Canada Pension Plan and the twin Quebec Pension Plan, as well as the Guaranteed Income Supplement for low-income seniors were introduced (in conjunction with Old Age Security) creating a de facto guaranteed income for the elderly. In 1966, the Canada Assistance Plan, which allowed the federal government to share the cost of welfare and social services with the provinces, was also introduced. However, by the late 1970s, Canada was facing major social and economic problems. The government experienced financial difficulties, resulting in an unprecendented attack on social programs. By the 1980s, spending restraint became the dominant force shapping social policy reform. Governments began to act on long-standing criticisms of social programs and policy makers turned their attention to reining in the costs of income security, health care and social services. CPP reform became a government priority and amendments were made to the Plan in order to restore the confidence of the Canadian public and made the plan more affordable for future generations. Similar changes were made to the QPP resulting in identical contribution rates. There have been significant changes to health and social services as a result of the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) which replaced the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) that allowed Ottawa to share the provincial cost of welfare and social services and the Established Programs Financing (EPF) under which Ottawa contributed to health care and postsecondary education.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014847
    Description:

    This article is intended to trace a portrait of developments in health status in the United States, France, Canada and Quebec, despite the difficulty posed by a lack of consistent tools for measuring morbidity as a whole or restrictions on activities. A review of the data showed a significant decline in mortality over the past few years. This decline was largely attributable to the drop in chronic disease. Developments with respect to morbidity, however, are less certain. Reported morbidity rose in France between 1980 and 1991, while the average number of pathologies among the elderly declined in the United States between 1982 and 1989. Some studies concluded increased life expectancy essentially amounted to an increased number of years lived with disabilities. This means life expectancy free of disabilities would have stagnated. Subsequent American data, however, showed a significant decline in chronic disabilities among cohorts of elderly persons. Between 1981 and 1991 in France, all increased life expectancy resulted in extended life free of disabilities. Quebec experienced substantial overall increased during the 1987-1993 period, although men gained more than women. The additional life span gained was free of moderate or serious disabilities. Life expectancy free of severe disabilities, as with life expectancy, shows similar progress among countries. Only life expectancy free of any form of disability has shown different results according to time periods and countries.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014848
    Description:

    This article examines the change, over the last fifteen years, in the standard of living of Canada's elderly. The text attempts to measure the scope and depth of poverty among the elderly, to draw up a historical profile of seniors' economic status based upon average pre-tax and after-tax income. It examines the inequality in the income distribution within the senior group and compares it with the other age groups. In the assessment of the elderly's standard of living, the author tries to expand the concept of resources by including the largest sources of non-money income. There is also discussion on the problems of insecurity specific to the elderly and the most vulnerable groups. The discussion includes consideration of the effects that changes in the terms of transition to retirement, in evidence over the past fifteen years, have had and are likely to have on the economic well being of the elderly. The last section provides an analysis of the change in seniors' income level according to their specific cohort. The conclusion emphasizes the selective and inherently fragile nature of the progress achieved.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014846
    Description:

    The chapter commences with a brief review of the history of social protection of the elderly in France and the characteristics of the current pension system in order that the reader can have a better understanding of the changes that have taken place in the living conditions of the elderly. Then, the authors introduce a comparison of the elderly's current standard of living with that of the working population. Income differences as well as the standard of living in households of persons over 60 years of age are examined. Lastly, the chapter concludes with a short description of the reality of ageing for persons of advanced age; dependency and isolation remain a major risk often associated with insufficient income in order to be able to cope better with their handicaps.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014849
    Description:

    This chapter is designed to provide the reader with insight into how economic circumstances change over time as people move from working age into, and through, the 'old age' phase of the life cycle. Patterns of change in incomes, levels of consumption, saving or dissaving, as well as other variables are presented in the paper. The level of peak lifetime after-tax income, which was previously attained when the average age of a birth cohort was in the early sixties or late fifties, is now reached when the cohort's average age is in the early fifties. Although the peak has shifted, real incomes have tended to rise from earlier to later cohorts. However, real incomes within a cohort tend to fall sharply as the cohort ages and moves into its sixties and seventies. There is a minor tendency for consumption to decline by less than income as cohorts age. On average, older Canadian households continue to save, and thus increase rather than use up their accumulated wealth, at least into their seventies. A large proportion continue to own their own homes, and most do so free of mortgages. However, lower-income households do not continue to save, and in fact tend to use up their accumulated wealth at older ages, if they have any to use up. The authors emphasize that inflation is a major concern for older cohorts and estimate that a pension without inflation protection commencing at age 65 would almost certainly suffer a loss of purchasing power in excess of 35% by the time the recipient was 80. And with longer life expectancy, cohorts will be subjected to longer periods of exposure to high inflation risks.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014845
    Description:

    This chapter assesses some of the key demographic and social changes affecting British social policy in the field of ageing. In the 1990s, personal care needs of the elderly are overwhelming provided by the family, where one is available. Formal care services are much more likely to be provided to those who live alone and have no family members who live near them or to those whose relatives do not have the skills or capabilities to care for them. However, There are changing attitudes regarding the giving and receiving of care and changing patterns of marriage and partnerships. Older people are moving away from wanting dependence on children, especially when it implies a long-term commitment arising out of a chronic illness or the need to provide personal care. Future trends will be affected by demographic and social changes affecting different age cohorts. Notable among these changes is the move towards both later marriage as well as the increased tendency to live outside any form of partnership. Another is the increased diversity of family forms. The family of the future may become at least as much an advocate for a vulnerable elder as it is a direct care provider. Demography is working hand-in hand with shifts in social and personal preferences.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014851
    Description:

    This chapter aims at using a generational approach to describe the lifestyle of the elderly in the early 1990s. Individuals observed for the purpose of this chapter were born between 1920 and 1936, approximately corresponding to parents of baby boomers. Beyond the positive relationship between the likelihood of institutionalization and an individual's age, marital status also appeared to play a key role. The marked difference between men's and women's life expectancies in private households, combined with a declining propensity of women to remarry after being widowed or divorced, have made elderly women twice as likely to live alone as men. The private households in which the elderly live are most often small, unigenerational family homes. When the household extends beyond this framework, disparities between men and women begin to appear. A man is more likely to cohabit with other generations if his wife was still part of the household. On the other hand, single women are more likely to live alone or with persons to whom they were not related. Women over 65 living within multigenerational households had a greater completed fertility rate than those living in unigenerational households. The fact that mothers of baby boomers are likely to have had a relatively large number of children is thus reassuring concerning their future access to informal support networks. However, we should observe other phenomena that could influence the establishment of informal networks, especially divorce - the increase of which among baby boomers could have a major impact.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014850
    Description:

    The chapter discusses the implications of demographic changes for the family ties of current and future older Canadians, focusing on the extent to which families can sustain support to their older members. Among those aged 65 and over, the likelihood of being married increased between 1981 and 1996. However, while the modal experience for men aged 75 and over is to be married, the modal experience for women of this age is to be widowed. The proportion of divorced or separated individuals rose consistently from 1961 to 1991 for all age groups, with slightly higher percentages among women. Current trends indicate that widowhood will decline and divorce will increase in significance as the basis for being unattached in old age. Major changes in family size include a decline in the percentage of women who are childless or have only one child and who have five or more children. Regarding siblings, most Canadians have at least one brother or sister. Although the proportion of adults with five or more brothers and sisters and with no siblings has declined, there has been an increase in the percentages for those with one to four siblings. Most Canadians do and will have the potential support of siblings in their familial networks. Smaller families, greater geographic dispersion, and higher divorce rates may increase the need for siblings to work together to support their parents and one another.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-570-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this book is to describe the nature, extent and consequences of informal care in Canada to seniors with high care needs. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey provide the basis for discussions of how seniors receiving care compare to other seniors; of the amount and types of care provided to seniors; of the impacts on caregivers of their caring work. Findings are synthesized into a set of issues concerning Canada's informal caregiving resources and the likely costs and benefits of increased demands on those resources.

    Release date: 1999-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X19990044721
    Description:

    As the Internation Year of the Senior Persons winds down, attention on this growing group of consumers will continue well into the next millenium. This event marked the first year that seniors have been recognized by a worldwide designation.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024661
    Description:

    This article looks at the people who are providing care to seniors with a long-term health problem, the factors that influence the amount of time they devote to eldercare and the types of hardships they experience as a result of helping.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024656
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of car use among seniors and highlights differences between those living in urban and rural areas.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034681
    Description:

    As governments have cut back on social and other services, an aging population's need for a strong support structure has grown. Seniors, in fact, have created both a growing market for such services and a potential source of volunteer labour to meet these needs; How involved are seniors in volunteering? What services are they providing? This study examines the volunteer activity of seniors aged 55 and over in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024601
    Description:

    Increasingly, men past the traditional retirement age (65) are continuing to work. This article examines whether changes in the workplace have accompanied this trend. The variables examined include self-employment, part-time work and flexible work arrangements.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024602
    Description:

    The two principal tax-assisted vehicles for retirement income planning in Canada are registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) and employer-sponsored registered pension plans (RPPs). Using 1996 tax data, this study compares various groups of workers and their retirement saving patterns.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014573
    Description:

    This article examines some of the characteristics that appear to predispose widowed women to live on their own, with particular emphasis on the extent of their contact with family and friends.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014575
    Description:

    This article looks at three-generation households.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999129
    Description:

    While there are many studies on differences in earnings between immigrants and the native-born or among immigrant groups, they ignore the distribution and concentration of income. These aspects are important for understanding the distribution of economic welfare and consumer behaviour among members and hence are policy relevant.

    Using the 1991 Census data, the distribution and concentration of income have been examined among 15 broad birthplace groups for population aged 55 years and over. About 19% of males and 15% of females receive less than half the median income and obtain 5% and 3% of the aggregate income respectively. About 30% of males and 29% of females receive more than one and half times the median income and obtain 61% and59% of aggregate income respectively. About 51% of males and 56% of females who receive incomes between half and one and half times the median income are termed middle-class and their shares of aggregate income amount to 34 and 38% respectively.

    Although, older immigrants aged 55 years and over, as a group, have roughly the same quartile distribution and concentration of income as their Canadian-born counterparts, the birthplace groups differ from each other. The groups coming from the developing regions, that is, the very groups that have lower average annual incomes, also have more inequitable distribution of income than the Canadian-born or their counterparts from the developed regions. Thus, the income distribution is more polarized in the populations from developing regions than in the populations from developed regions or in the Canadian-born population. On average, females receive 45% less income than males, and there is less polarization of income among them than among males regardless of the place of birth. A part of the explanation lies in the receipt of government transfers which tend to equalize rather than polarize incomes, and older women derive higher proportion of their income from government transfers than older men.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044421
    Description:

    This article highlights the key demographic and socio-economic characteristics of seniors in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

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