Statistics by subject – Seniors

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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126037
    Description:

    This report focuses on employer pension plan assets, together with other private pension assets such as registered retirement savings plans. It also presents estimates of net worth, including the value of employer pension plan benefits.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095984
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of people currently retiring before the age of 60.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2001004
    Description:

    This paper looks at the Internet use of older Canadians and compares them with older non-Internet users with respect to income, education and gender.

    Release date: 2001-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005746
    Description:

    Since the 1950s, life expectancy at age 60 has grown considerably. A woman reaching age 60 in 1951 could expect to live an additional 19 years on average, whereas in 1996, a woman of that age could expect to live an average of 24 years. For men, however, the increase has been less pronounced; their life expectancy increased by just over three years during the same period.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001008
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of seniors in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015701
    Description:

    This article probes how different mixes of social factors increase or diminish the likelihood that a person will be a volunteer at different stages of the life cycle.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

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