Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511013151
    Description:

    The Guaranteed Income Supplement is one of the pillars of Canada's safety net for seniors. Available to those with little or no income other than Old Age Security, it plays an integral part in reducing low income among those 65 and over. However, a misunderstanding of the rules and requirements has meant that some eligible seniors are missing out.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913149
    Description:

    While spending on prescription drugs still constitutes less than 1% of the overall household budget, the average expenditure rose 71% between 1992 and 2002. Lack of universal coverage for prescription drugs could adversely affect seniors on fixed incomes and people with specific medical conditions. Spending is most affected by province of residence.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913150
    Description:

    The likelihood of returning to paid employment after retirement is influenced by various factors. Although most retirees rejoin the workforce for financial reasons, non-financial considerations are also important. Many in the study who worked full time prior to retirement chose to return on a part-time basis - over one-third of the men and more than half of the women.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20051128982
    Description:

    As households age and labour market attachment diminishes, income, savings and wealth generally become less. Households also become smaller as adult children leave or a spouse dies. And spending patterns change. Using 'similar' households, this study looks at changes in spending patterns for households headed by persons aged 55 or older in 1982 and 2003.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005271
    Description:

    The age distributions of professors at Canadian universities without mandatory retirement and those at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have diverged over time with a higher fraction of professors over the age of 65 being at universities without mandatory retirement. An analysis of a discrete time hazard model indicates that faculty members at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have exit rates at age 65 that are 30 to 35 percentage points higher than those of their counterparts at universities without mandatory retirement. Similar results are found for both men and women; however, the magnitude of this effect is somewhat smaller for women. This does not support the view that mandatory retirement is a more severe constraint on the behaviour of female academics

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018711
    Description:

    Prevalence estimates of having no natural teeth and of denture use

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028453
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at recent retirees (individuals who retired during the preceding decade and were at least 50 years old when they did so) and their enjoyment of life before and after retirement. A statistical model explores the relationship between enjoyment of retired life and specific individual characteristics (for example, marital status, health and financial wellbeing) while holding the effects of other characteristics constant.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018439
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that unhealthy behaviours may have a delayed effect, catching up to seniors

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048044
    Description:

    The prevalence of hearing problems among seniors is presented by age, sex and province. The association of hearing problems with seniors' perceived quality of life is also addressed.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Table: 62-001-X20050058080
    Description:

    This study examines the inflation rate experienced by seniors-only households from 1992 to 2004. Their inflation rate is compared with that of all other households and the official Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510313137
    Description:

    Local government revenues are increasingly perceived as inadequate to fund the program responsibilities of municipalities. Property taxes (residential and non-residential) are by far the most important revenue source, accounting for 35% in 2003 (up from 30% in 1988). But, residential property taxes are commonly viewed as regressive in relation to income. This study uses the 2001 Census of Population to quantify the regressiveness of residential property taxes in Canadian municipalities, and to examine whether regressive taxes are generally attributable to lower-income seniors living in high-priced homes.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005027
    Description:

    This study examines the inflation rate experienced by seniors-only households from 1992 to 2004. Their inflation rate is compared with that of all other households and the official Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2005-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2005004
    Description:

    This article identifies the determinants of healthy aging between 1994-1995 and 2002-2003 among middle-aged adults and seniors. A broad range of health and mortality determinants are evaluated: demographic and socio­-economic characteristics (age, sex, living arrangements, education, household income, rural/urban residence), health related behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity in leisure time, weight), psycho-social factors (stress, sense of coherence, social support), chronic conditions and frequency of medical consultations.

    Release date: 2005-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009090
    Description:

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009087
    Description:

    Dependency, chronic conditions and pain in seniors estimates the prevalence of dependency in the population aged 65 or older by age group and by the presence of specific chronic conditions. The analysis focuses on how the relationship between dependency and chronic conditions is affected when pain is also considered.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009086
    Description:

    Healthy living among seniors explores good health in relation to health behaviours and psychosocial factors. The components of good health are presented for the senior population by age group and by sex. The article looks at the importance of health behaviours such as exercise, alcohol consumption, diet and smoking, as well stress and community belonging. The effect of healthy behaviours over time is also assessed.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 62-001-X20050058080
    Description:

    This study examines the inflation rate experienced by seniors-only households from 1992 to 2004. Their inflation rate is compared with that of all other households and the official Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511013151
    Description:

    The Guaranteed Income Supplement is one of the pillars of Canada's safety net for seniors. Available to those with little or no income other than Old Age Security, it plays an integral part in reducing low income among those 65 and over. However, a misunderstanding of the rules and requirements has meant that some eligible seniors are missing out.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913149
    Description:

    While spending on prescription drugs still constitutes less than 1% of the overall household budget, the average expenditure rose 71% between 1992 and 2002. Lack of universal coverage for prescription drugs could adversely affect seniors on fixed incomes and people with specific medical conditions. Spending is most affected by province of residence.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913150
    Description:

    The likelihood of returning to paid employment after retirement is influenced by various factors. Although most retirees rejoin the workforce for financial reasons, non-financial considerations are also important. Many in the study who worked full time prior to retirement chose to return on a part-time basis - over one-third of the men and more than half of the women.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20051128982
    Description:

    As households age and labour market attachment diminishes, income, savings and wealth generally become less. Households also become smaller as adult children leave or a spouse dies. And spending patterns change. Using 'similar' households, this study looks at changes in spending patterns for households headed by persons aged 55 or older in 1982 and 2003.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005271
    Description:

    The age distributions of professors at Canadian universities without mandatory retirement and those at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have diverged over time with a higher fraction of professors over the age of 65 being at universities without mandatory retirement. An analysis of a discrete time hazard model indicates that faculty members at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have exit rates at age 65 that are 30 to 35 percentage points higher than those of their counterparts at universities without mandatory retirement. Similar results are found for both men and women; however, the magnitude of this effect is somewhat smaller for women. This does not support the view that mandatory retirement is a more severe constraint on the behaviour of female academics

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018711
    Description:

    Prevalence estimates of having no natural teeth and of denture use

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028453
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at recent retirees (individuals who retired during the preceding decade and were at least 50 years old when they did so) and their enjoyment of life before and after retirement. A statistical model explores the relationship between enjoyment of retired life and specific individual characteristics (for example, marital status, health and financial wellbeing) while holding the effects of other characteristics constant.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028452
    Description:

    Settling into retirement involves changes in many aspects of a person's life. Certainly financial adjustments are involved as employment income is replaced by retirement income and spending patterns are altered. People often find they have to make psychological and social adjustments as well. In light of these substantial transformations in lifestyle, retirement counsellors are increasingly encouraging older workers to prepare just as carefully for the non-financial as the financial challenges of retirement. This article draws on the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine four specific non-financial preparations made prior to leaving the labour force by Canadians who had retired in the previous 10 years (1992 to 2002).

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018439
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that unhealthy behaviours may have a delayed effect, catching up to seniors

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048044
    Description:

    The prevalence of hearing problems among seniors is presented by age, sex and province. The association of hearing problems with seniors' perceived quality of life is also addressed.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510313137
    Description:

    Local government revenues are increasingly perceived as inadequate to fund the program responsibilities of municipalities. Property taxes (residential and non-residential) are by far the most important revenue source, accounting for 35% in 2003 (up from 30% in 1988). But, residential property taxes are commonly viewed as regressive in relation to income. This study uses the 2001 Census of Population to quantify the regressiveness of residential property taxes in Canadian municipalities, and to examine whether regressive taxes are generally attributable to lower-income seniors living in high-priced homes.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005027
    Description:

    This study examines the inflation rate experienced by seniors-only households from 1992 to 2004. Their inflation rate is compared with that of all other households and the official Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2005-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2005004
    Description:

    This article identifies the determinants of healthy aging between 1994-1995 and 2002-2003 among middle-aged adults and seniors. A broad range of health and mortality determinants are evaluated: demographic and socio­-economic characteristics (age, sex, living arrangements, education, household income, rural/urban residence), health related behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity in leisure time, weight), psycho-social factors (stress, sense of coherence, social support), chronic conditions and frequency of medical consultations.

    Release date: 2005-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009090
    Description:

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009087
    Description:

    Dependency, chronic conditions and pain in seniors estimates the prevalence of dependency in the population aged 65 or older by age group and by the presence of specific chronic conditions. The analysis focuses on how the relationship between dependency and chronic conditions is affected when pain is also considered.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009086
    Description:

    Healthy living among seniors explores good health in relation to health behaviours and psychosocial factors. The components of good health are presented for the senior population by age group and by sex. The article looks at the importance of health behaviours such as exercise, alcohol consumption, diet and smoking, as well stress and community belonging. The effect of healthy behaviours over time is also assessed.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009088
    Description:

    Seniors' health care use provides estimates of the proportions of seniors who consulted medical professionals, took various types of medication, were hospitalized and received home care services. Associations between health status and the use of these forms of health care is examined. The relationship between the use of health care and socio-economic status is also considered.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009089
    Description:

    Successful aging in health care institutions explores factors associated with positive self-perceived health among seniors who live in health care institutions. Prevalence rates of positive self-perceived health are estimated and characteristics associated with it are identified. As well, factors related to death among institutional residents over a six-year period are analysed.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

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