Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611113175
    Description:

    Just as the responsibility of raising children is lifting, many families are facing a new challenge providing care to aging parents, relatives or friends. The intensity of work and eldercare can affect the work life balance of the caregiver. An examination of the prevalence and impact of caregiving among those aged 45 to 64, looking at the hours spent on both paid work and informal care of seniors.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049498
    Description:

    In 2003, 15% of seniors living in private households received some form of home care. Over half of seniors who had home care received it from formal sources only services entirely or partially covered by government, private agencies or volunteers. Housework was the most common type of home care received by seniors. Four in ten seniors who needed help moving about in their house, and one-third of those who needed help with personal care, did not receive home care.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049497
    Description:

    The proportion of Canadians receiving governmentsubsidized home care was almost stable between 1994/95 and 2003, rising only slightly from 2.5% to 2.7%. Over that period, the average age of people receiving this type of care fell from just under 65 to 62. Among people who needed help with personal care, the proportion receiving government-subsidized home care fell from one-half to one-third. In 1994/95, 8% of recipients of government-subsidized home care were incontinent; by 2003, the proportion had more than doubled to 17%.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006286
    Description:

    We analyze the degree to which Canadian families are covered by private pension plans and document how their savings for retirement (made through contributions to tax-assisted retirement savings programs) have evolved over the last two decades. We find that two-parent families, lone-parent families and other individuals located in the bottom quintile of the earnings distribution are not better prepared for retirement than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. On the other hand, those located in the top quintile are better prepared than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. As a result, Canadian families' preparedness for retirement, which was fairly unequal in the mid-1980s, has become even more unequal over the last two decades. This finding has important implications for the future. Recent research has shown that the maturation of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPPs) has led to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the absence of offsetting trends, the growing inequality in Canadian families preparedness for retirement implies that that the distribution of family income among seniors should become more unequal in the years to come.

    Release date: 2006-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006046
    Description:

    This study analyzes the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income among women and men 65 years of age and over, who became widowed at any point between 1993 and 2003. The source of data is Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2006-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413161
    Description:

    A registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) constitutes a key component of retirement income planning in Canada. RRSPs allow individuals to save pre-tax dollars in a variety of investment instruments where interest, dividends and capital gains accrue tax free until the funds are withdrawn. However, the taxman will eventually receive his due. RRSPs must be converted into an annuity or a registered retirement income fund (RRIF) in the year the taxpayer turns 69, with prescribed minimum withdrawals starting the following year. RRSP withdrawals already generate significant tax revenues, estimated at over $4 billion in 2002. Although mandatory conversion affects mainly middle- and high-income earners, some low-income savers could have their means-tested social benefits reduced by the boost in income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050029195
    Description:

    As well as sub-zero temperatures and snowstorms, flu viruses arrive with the Canadian winter. Healthy people usually recover from the fever, cough, headache and other symptoms in less than a week. But some "especially seniors and those with lung or cardiac conditions" may have more severe cases of the flu and may even need to be hospitalized.

    Release date: 2006-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213157
    Description:

    While the majority of Canadians aged 50 to 69 not in the labour force were retired in 2003, nearly half a million were not working for health-related reasons. The Canadian Community Health Survey is used to compare the health of working individuals aged 50 to 69 with their contemporaries who are not working, whether for health or other reasons. Chronic conditions and lifestyle choices are also examined.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611113175
    Description:

    Just as the responsibility of raising children is lifting, many families are facing a new challenge providing care to aging parents, relatives or friends. The intensity of work and eldercare can affect the work life balance of the caregiver. An examination of the prevalence and impact of caregiving among those aged 45 to 64, looking at the hours spent on both paid work and informal care of seniors.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049498
    Description:

    In 2003, 15% of seniors living in private households received some form of home care. Over half of seniors who had home care received it from formal sources only services entirely or partially covered by government, private agencies or volunteers. Housework was the most common type of home care received by seniors. Four in ten seniors who needed help moving about in their house, and one-third of those who needed help with personal care, did not receive home care.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049497
    Description:

    The proportion of Canadians receiving governmentsubsidized home care was almost stable between 1994/95 and 2003, rising only slightly from 2.5% to 2.7%. Over that period, the average age of people receiving this type of care fell from just under 65 to 62. Among people who needed help with personal care, the proportion receiving government-subsidized home care fell from one-half to one-third. In 1994/95, 8% of recipients of government-subsidized home care were incontinent; by 2003, the proportion had more than doubled to 17%.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006286
    Description:

    We analyze the degree to which Canadian families are covered by private pension plans and document how their savings for retirement (made through contributions to tax-assisted retirement savings programs) have evolved over the last two decades. We find that two-parent families, lone-parent families and other individuals located in the bottom quintile of the earnings distribution are not better prepared for retirement than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. On the other hand, those located in the top quintile are better prepared than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. As a result, Canadian families' preparedness for retirement, which was fairly unequal in the mid-1980s, has become even more unequal over the last two decades. This finding has important implications for the future. Recent research has shown that the maturation of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPPs) has led to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the absence of offsetting trends, the growing inequality in Canadian families preparedness for retirement implies that that the distribution of family income among seniors should become more unequal in the years to come.

    Release date: 2006-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006046
    Description:

    This study analyzes the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income among women and men 65 years of age and over, who became widowed at any point between 1993 and 2003. The source of data is Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2006-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413161
    Description:

    A registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) constitutes a key component of retirement income planning in Canada. RRSPs allow individuals to save pre-tax dollars in a variety of investment instruments where interest, dividends and capital gains accrue tax free until the funds are withdrawn. However, the taxman will eventually receive his due. RRSPs must be converted into an annuity or a registered retirement income fund (RRIF) in the year the taxpayer turns 69, with prescribed minimum withdrawals starting the following year. RRSP withdrawals already generate significant tax revenues, estimated at over $4 billion in 2002. Although mandatory conversion affects mainly middle- and high-income earners, some low-income savers could have their means-tested social benefits reduced by the boost in income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050029195
    Description:

    As well as sub-zero temperatures and snowstorms, flu viruses arrive with the Canadian winter. Healthy people usually recover from the fever, cough, headache and other symptoms in less than a week. But some "especially seniors and those with lung or cardiac conditions" may have more severe cases of the flu and may even need to be hospitalized.

    Release date: 2006-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213157
    Description:

    While the majority of Canadians aged 50 to 69 not in the labour force were retired in 2003, nearly half a million were not working for health-related reasons. The Canadian Community Health Survey is used to compare the health of working individuals aged 50 to 69 with their contemporaries who are not working, whether for health or other reasons. Chronic conditions and lifestyle choices are also examined.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

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