Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2007006
    Description:

    This analysis examines the relationship between the dissolution of a marital or cohabitating relationship and subsequent depression among Canadians aged 20 to 64.

    The article is based on data from the household component of the National Population Health Survey (NPHS). This longitudinal survey is conducted by Statistics Canada and has followed the same group of people every two years since 1994/1995.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019491
    Description:

    Evaluating the impact of changes to services on the health status of frail elderly adults calls for longitudinal studies. Many subjects are however lost during follow-up because of the high incidence of death in this population. Traditional methods of repeated measures analysis are thus inappropriate since they ignore subjects with incomplete follow-up data. This leads to a considerable reduction in sample size and to biases.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2007006
    Description:

    This analysis examines the relationship between the dissolution of a marital or cohabitating relationship and subsequent depression among Canadians aged 20 to 64.

    The article is based on data from the household component of the National Population Health Survey (NPHS). This longitudinal survey is conducted by Statistics Canada and has followed the same group of people every two years since 1994/1995.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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