Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000411391
    Description:

    This analysis uses data from the Cognition Module of the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey - Healthy Aging to validate a categorization of levels of cognitive functioning in the household population aged 45 or older.

    Release date: 2010-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000311289
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this study provides up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of good health, chronic conditions and health-promoting factors among seniors and adults aged 45 to 64.

    Release date: 2010-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010026
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), released by Statistics Canada in December 2009, was designed to collect information about Canadians' knowledge, abilities, and behaviours concerning financial decision-making. In addition to information on approaches to money management and financial planning, the CFCS collected information on issues relevant to current discussions about Canada's retirement income system. For example, retired respondents were asked about their financial standard of living in retirement and whether their retirement income is sufficient to comfortably cover their bills and financial commitments. Working-age Canadians were asked about their financial preparations for retirement. This research note provides highlights on retirement issues using the CFCS.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111133
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000411391
    Description:

    This analysis uses data from the Cognition Module of the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey - Healthy Aging to validate a categorization of levels of cognitive functioning in the household population aged 45 or older.

    Release date: 2010-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000311289
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this study provides up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of good health, chronic conditions and health-promoting factors among seniors and adults aged 45 to 64.

    Release date: 2010-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010026
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), released by Statistics Canada in December 2009, was designed to collect information about Canadians' knowledge, abilities, and behaviours concerning financial decision-making. In addition to information on approaches to money management and financial planning, the CFCS collected information on issues relevant to current discussions about Canada's retirement income system. For example, retired respondents were asked about their financial standard of living in retirement and whether their retirement income is sufficient to comfortably cover their bills and financial commitments. Working-age Canadians were asked about their financial preparations for retirement. This research note provides highlights on retirement issues using the CFCS.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111133
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

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